sci_linguistic Кэролайн Кин Тайна загадочной лестницы [with w_cat] ru en

Вниманию читателей предлагается книга Кэролайн Кин «Тайна загадочной лестницы».

Каждый абзац текста, на английском языке, снабжен ссылкой на литературный перевод.

Книга предназначена для учащихся старший классов школ, лицеев и гимназий, а также для широкого круга лиц, интересующихся английской литературой и совершенствующих свою языковую подготовку.

***

Нэнси — дочь известного адвоката Карсона Дру из американского городка Ривер-Хайтс. Она часто помогает отцу в расследовании сложных и захватывающих дел…

w_cat my_Make_FB2 17.11.2011 1.01 It's project w_cat

[1] Carolyn Keene

The Nancy Drew Mystery Stories 2:

The Hidden Staircase

Предуведомление.

Данная книга из серии «Нэнси Дру», сделана из двух: «The Hidden Staircase» и «Тайна загадочной лестницы», автор Кэролайн Кин.

Я старался соотнести по смыслу английский текст с его переводом, часто переводчик вводит в текст "отсебятину", но ведь это не "подстрочник", цель переводчика донести смысл... Но отсутствие «разжеванных» ответов, как мне кажется, будет лучше стимулировать мысль учащегося.

Полноценно работать с данным пособием можно на устройстве, поддерживающем гиперссылки: компьютер или различные «читалки» с сенсорным экраном, желательно со словарем.

Успехов!

W_cat.

[2] CHAPTER I. The Haunted House.

[3] NANCY DREW began peeling off her garden gloves as she ran up the porch steps and into the hall to answer the ringing telephone. She picked it up and said, "Hello!"

[4] "Hi, Nancy! This is Helen." Although Helen Corning was nearly three years older than Nancy, the two girls were close friends.

[5] "Are you tied up on a case?" Helen asked.

[6] "No. What's up? A mystery?"

[7] "Yes—a haunted house."

[8] Nancy sat down on the chair by the telephone. "Tell me more!" the eighteen-year-old detective begged excitedly.

[9] "You've heard me speak of my Aunt Rosemary," Helen began. "Since becoming a widow, she has lived with her mother at Twin Elms, the old family mansion out in Cliffwood. Well, I went to see them yesterday. They said that many strange, mysterious things have been happening there recently. I told them how good you are at solving mysteries, and they'd like you to come out to Twin Elms and help them." Helen paused, out of breath.

[10] "It certainly sounds intriguing," Nancy replied, her eyes dancing.

[11] "If you're not busy, Aunt Rosemary and I would like to come over in about an hour and talk to you about the ghost."

[12] "I can't wait."

[13] After Nancy had put down the phone, she sat lost in thought for several minutes. Since solving The Secret of the Old Clock, she had longed for another case. Here was her chance!

[14] Attractive, blond-haired Nancy was brought out of her daydreaming by the sound of the doorbell. At the same moment the Drews' housekeeper, Hannah Gruen, came down the front stairs.

[15] "I'll answer it," she offered.

[16] Mrs. Gruen had lived with the Drews since Nancy was three years old. At that time Mrs. Drew had passed away and Hannah had become like a second mother to Nancy. There was a deep affection between the two, and Nancy confided all her secrets to the understanding housekeeper.

[17] Mrs. Gruen opened the door and instantly a man stepped into the hall. He was short, thin, and rather stooped. Nancy guessed his age to be about forty.

[18] "Is Mr. Drew at home?" he asked brusquely. "My name is Comber — Nathan Comber."

[19] "No, he's not here just now," the housekeeper replied.

[20] The caller looked over Hannah Gruen's shoulder and stared at Nancy. "Are you Nancy Drew?"

[21] "Yes, I am.  Is there anything I can do for you?"

[22] The man's shifty gaze moved from Nancy to Hannah. "I've come out of the goodness of my heart to warn you and your father," he said pompously.

[23] " Warn us? About what?" Nancy asked quickly.

[24] Nathan Comber straightened up importantly and said, "Your father is in great danger, Miss. Drew!"

Both Nancy and Hannah Gruen gasped. “You mean this very minute?" the housekeeper questioned.

[25] " All the time," was the startling answer. "I understand you're a pretty bright girl, Miss Drew—that you even solve mysteries. Well, right now I advise you to stick close to your father. Don't leave him for a minute."

[26] Hannah Gruen looked as if she were ready to collapse and suggested that they all go into the living room, sit down, and talk the matter over. When they were seated, Nancy asked Nathan Comber to explain further.

[27] "The story in a nutshell is this," he began. "You know that your father was brought in to do legal work for the railroad when it was buying property for the new bridge here."

[28] As Nancy nodded, he continued, "Well, a lot of the folks who sold their property think they were gypped."

Nancy's face reddened. "I understood from my father that everyone was well paid."

[29] "That's not true," said Comber. "Besides, the railroad is in a real mess now. One of the property owners, whose deed and signature they claim to have, says that he never signed the contract of sale."

[30] "What's his name?" Nancy asked.

[31] "Willie Wharton."

[32] Nancy had not heard her father mention this name. She asked Gomber to go on with his story. "I'm acting as agent for Willie Wharton and several of the land owners who were his neighbors," he said, "and they can make it pretty tough for the railroad. Willie Wharton's signature was never witnessed and the attached certificate of acknowledgment was not notarized. That's good proof the signature was a forgery. Well, if the railroad thinks they're going to get away with this, they're not!"

[33] Nancy frowned. Such a procedure on the part of the property owners meant trouble for her father! She said evenly, "But all Willie Wharton has to do is swear before a notary that he did sign the contract of sale."

[34] Comber chuckled. "It's not that easy, Miss Drew. Willie Wharton is not available. Some of us have a good idea where he is and we'll produce him at the right time. But that time won't be until the railroad promises to give the sellers more money. Then he'll sign. You see, Willie is a real kind man and he wants to help his friends out whenever he can. Now he's got a chance."

[35] Nancy had taken an instant dislike to Comber and now it was quadrupled. She judged him to be the kind of person who stays within the boundaries of the law but whose ethics are questionable. This was indeed a tough problem for Mr. Drew!

[36] "Who are the people who are apt to harm my father?" she asked.

[37] "I'm not saying who they are," Nathan Comber retorted. "You don't seem very appreciative of my coming here to warn you. Fine kind of a daughter you are. You don't care what happens to your father!"

[38] Annoyed by the man's insolence, both Nancy and Mrs. Gruen angrily stood up. The housekeeper, pointing toward the front door, said, "Good day, Mr. Comber!"

The caller shrugged as he too arose. "Have it your own way, but don't say I didn't warn you!"

[39] He walked to the front door, opened it, and as he went outside, closed it with a tremendous bang.

[40] "Well, of all the insulting people!" Hannah snorted.

[41] Nancy nodded. "But that's not the worst of it, Hannah darling. I think there's more to Comber's warning than he is telling. It seems to me to imply a threat. And he almost has me convinced. Maybe I should stay close to Dad until he and the other lawyers have straightened out this railroad tangle."

[42] She said this would mean giving up a case she had been asked to take. Hastily Nancy gave Hannah the highlights of her conversation with Helen about the haunted mansion. "Helen and her aunt will be here in a little while to tell us the whole story."

[43] "Oh, maybe things aren't so serious for your father as that horrible man made out," Hannah said encouragingly. "If I were you I'd listen to the details about the haunted house and then decide what you want to do about the mystery."

[44] In a short time a sports car pulled into the winding, tree-shaded driveway of the Drew home. The large brick house was set some distance back from the street.

[45] Helen was at the wheel and stopped just beyond the front entrance. She helped her aunt from the car and they came up the steps together. Mrs. Rosemary Hayes was tall and slender and had graying hair. Her face had a gentle expression but she looked tired.

[46] Helen introduced her aunt to Nancy and to Hannah, and the group went into the living room to sit down. Hannah offered to prepare tea and left the room.

[47] "Oh, Nancy!' said Helen, "I do hope you can take Aunt Rosemary and Miss Flora's case." Quickly she explained that Miss Flora was her aunt's mother. "Aunt Rosemary is really my great-aunt and Miss Flora is my great-grandmother. From the time she was a little girl everybody has called her Miss Flora."

[48] "The name may seem odd to people the first time they hear it," Mrs. Hayes remarked, "but we're all so used to it, we never think anything about it."

[49] "Please tell me more about your house," Nancy requested, smiling.

[50] "Mother and I are almost nervous wrecks," Mrs. Hayes replied. "I have urged her to leave Twin Elms, but she won't. You see, Mother has lived there ever since she married my father, Everett Turnbull."

[51] Mrs. Hayes went on to say that all kinds of strange happenings had occurred during the past couple of weeks. They had heard untraceable music, thumps and creaking noises at night, and had seen eerie, indescribable shadows on walls.

[52] "Have you notified the police?" Nancy asked.

[53] "Oh, yes," Mrs. Hayes answered. "But after talking with my mother, they came to the conclusion that most of what she saw and heard could be explained by natural causes. The rest, they said, probably was imagination on her part. You see, she's over eighty years old, and while I know her mind is sound and alert, I'm afraid that the police don't think so."

[54] After a pause Mrs. Hayes went on, "I had almost talked myself into thinking the ghostly noises could be attributed to natural causes, when something else happened."

[55] "What was that?" Nancy questioned eagerly.

[56] "We were robbed! During the night several pieces of old jewelry were taken. I did telephone the police about this and they came to the house for a description of the pieces. But they still would not admit that a ghostly visitor had taken them."

[57] Nancy was thoughtful for several seconds before making a comment. Then she said, "Do the police have any idea who the thief might be?"

Aunt Rosemary shook her head. "No. And I'm afraid we might have more burglaries."

[58] Many ideas were running through Nancy's head. One was that the thief apparently had no intention of harming anyone—that his only motive had been burglary. Was he or was he not the person who was "haunting" the house? Or could the strange happenings have some natural explanations, as the police had suggested?

[59] At this moment Hannah returned with a large silver tray on which was a tea service and some dainty sandwiches. She set the tray on a table and asked Nancy to pour the tea. She herself passed the cups of tea and sandwiches to the callers.

[60] As they ate, Helen said, "Aunt Rosemary hasn't told you half the things that have happened. Once Miss Flora thought she saw someone sliding out of a fireplace at midnight, and another time a chair moved from one side of the room to the other while her back was turned. But no one was there!"

[61] "How extraordinary!" Hannah Gruen exclaimed. "I've often read about such things, but I never thought I'd meet anyone who lived in a haunted house."

[62] Helen turned to Nancy and gazed pleadingly at her friend. "You see how much you're needed at Twin Elms? Won't you please go out there with me and solve the mystery of the ghost?"

[63] CHAPTER II. The Mysterious Mishap.

[64] SIPPING their tea, Helen Corning and her aunt waited for Nancy's decision. The young sleuth was in a dilemma. She wanted to start at once solving the mystery of the "ghost" of Twin Elms. But Nathan Comber's warning still rang in her ears and she felt that her first duty was to stay with her father.

[65] At last she spoke.  "'Mrs. Hayes—" she began.

[66] "Please call me Aunt Rosemary," the caller requested. "All Helen's friends do."

Nancy smiled. "I'd love to. Aunt Rosemary, may I please let you know tonight or tomorrow? I really must speak to my father about the case. And something else came up just this afternoon which may keep me at home for a while at least."

[67] "I understand," Mrs. Hayes answered, trying to conceal her disappointment.

[68] Helen Corning did not take Nancy's announcement so calmly. "Oh, Nancy, you just must come. I'm sure your dad would want you to help us. Can't you postpone the other thing until you get back?"

[69] "I'm afraid not," said Nancy. "I can't tell you all the details, but Dad has been threatened and I feel that I ought to stay close to him."

[70] Hannah Gruen added her fears. "Goodness only knows what they may do to Mr. Drew," she said. "Somebody could come up and hit him on the head, or poison his food in a restaurant, or—"

[71] Helen and her aunt gasped. "It's that bad?" Helen asked, her eyes growing wide.

[72] Nancy explained that she would talk to her father when he returned home. "I hate to disappoint you," she said, "but you can see what a quandary I'm in."

[73] "You poor girl!" said Mrs. Hayes sympathetically. "Now don't you worry about us."

Nancy smiled. "I'll worry whether I come or not," she said. "Anyway, I'll talk to my dad tonight."

[74] The callers left shortly. When the door had closed behind them, Hannah put an arm around Nancy's shoulders. "I'm sure everything will come out all right for everybody," she said. "I'm sorry I talked about those dreadful things that might happen to your father. I let my imagination run away with me, just like they say Miss Flora's does with her."

[75] "You're a great comfort, Hannah dear," said Nancy. "To tell the truth, I have thought of all kinds of horrible things myself." She began to pace the floor. "I wish Dad would get home."

[76] During the next hour she went to the window at least a dozen times, hoping to see her father's car coming up the street. It was not until six o'clock that she heard the crunch of wheels on the driveway and saw Mr. Drew's sedan pull into the garage.

[77] "He's safe!" she cried out to Hannah, who was testing potatoes that were baking in the oven.

[78] In a flash Nancy was out the back door and running to meet her father. "Oh, Dad, I'm so glad to see you!" she exclaimed.

She gave him a tremendous hug and a resounding kiss. He responded affectionately, but gave a little chuckle. "What have I done to rate this extra bit of attention?" he teased. With a wink he added, "I know. Your date for tonight is off and you want me to substitute."

[79] " Oh, Dad," Nancy replied. "Of course my date's not off. But I'm just about to call it off."

[80] "Why?" Mr. Drew questioned. "Isn't Dirk going to stay on your list?"

[81] "It's not that," Nancy replied. "It's because— because you're in terrible danger, Dad. I've been warned not to leave you."

[82] Instead of looking alarmed, the lawyer burst out laughing. "In terrible danger of what? Are you going to make a raid on my wallet?"

[83] "Dad, be serious! I really mean what I'm saying. Nathan Comber was here and told me that you're in great danger and I'd better stay with you at all times."

[84] The lawyer sobered at once. "That pest again!" he exclaimed. "There are times when I'd like to thrash the man till he begged for mercy!"

[85] Mr. Drew suggested that they postpone their discussion about Nathan Comber until dinner was over. Then he would tell his daughter the true facts in the case. After they had finished dinner, Hannah insisted upon tidying up alone while father and daughter talked.

[86] "I will admit that there is a bit of a muddle about the railroad bridge," Mr. Drew began. "What happened was that the lawyer who went to get Willie Wharton's signature was very ill at the time. Unfortunately, he failed to have the signature witnessed or have the attached certificate of acknowledgment executed. The poor man passed away a few hours later."

[87] "And the other railroad lawyers failed to notice that the signature hadn't been witnessed or the certificate notarized?" Nancy asked.

[88] "Not right away. The matter did not come to light until the man's widow turned his brief case over to the railroad. The old deed to Wharton's property was there, so the lawyers assumed that the signature on the contract was genuine. The contract for the railroad bridge was awarded and work began. Suddenly Nathan Comber appeared, saying he represented Willie Wharton and others who had owned property which the railroad had bought on either side of the Muskoka River."

[89] "I understood from Mr. Comber," said Nancy, "that Willie Wharton is trying to get more money for his neighbors by holding out for a higher price himself."

[90] "That's the story. Personally, I think it's a sharp deal on Comber's part. The more people he can get money for, the higher his commission," Mr. Drew stated.

[91] "What a mess!" Nancy exclaimed. "And what can be done?"

[92] "To tell the truth, there is little anyone can do until Willie Wharton is found. Comber knows this, of course, and has probably advised Wharton to stay in hiding until the railroad agrees to give everybody more money."

[93] Nancy had been watching her father intently. Now she saw an expression of eagerness come over his face. He leaned forward in his chair and said, "But I think I'm about to outwit Mr. Nathan Comber. I've had a tip that Willie Wharton is in Chicago and I'm leaving Monday morning to find out."

[94] Mr. Drew went on, "I believe that Wharton will say he did sign the contract of sale which the railroad company has and will readily consent to having the certificate of acknowledgment notarized. Then, of course, the railroad won't pay him or any of the other property owners another cent."

[95] "But, Dad, you still haven't convinced me you're not in danger," Nancy reminded him.

[96] "Nancy dear," her father replied, "I feel that I am not in danger. Comber is nothing but a blow-hard. I doubt that he or Willie Wharton or any of the other property owners would resort to violence to keep me from working on this case. He's just trying to scare me into persuading the railroad to accede to his demands."

[97] Nancy looked skeptical.. "But don't forget that you're about to go to Chicago and produce the very man Comber and those property owners don't want around here just now."

[98] "I know." Mr. Drew nodded. "But I still doubt if anyone would use force to keep me from going." Laughingly the lawyer added, "So I won't need you as a bodyguard, Nancy."

[99] His daughter gave a sigh of resignation. "All right, Dad, you know best." She then proceeded to tell her father about the Twin Elms mystery, which she had been asked to solve. "If you approve," Nancy said in conclusion, "I'd like to go over there with Helen."

[100] Mr. Drew had listened with great interest. Now, after a few moments of thought, he smiled. "Go by all means, Nancy. I realize you've been itching to work on a new case—and this sounds like a real challenge. But please be careful."

[101] "Oh, I will, Dad!" Nancy promised, her face lighting up. "Thanks a million." She jumped from her chair, gave her father a kiss, then went to phone Helen the good news. It was arranged that the girls would go to Twin Elms on Monday morning.

[102] Nancy returned to the living room, eager to discuss the mystery further. Her father, however, glanced at his wrist watch. "Say, young lady, you'd better go dress for that date of yours." He winked. "I happen to know that Dirk doesn't like to be kept waiting."

[103] "Especially by any of my mysteries." She laughed and hurried upstairs to change into a dance dress.

[104] Half an hour later Dirk Jackson arrived. Nancy and the red-haired, former high-school tennis champion drove off to pick up another couple and attend an amateur play and dance given by the local Little Theater group.

[105] Nancy thoroughly enjoyed herself and was sorry when the affair ended. With the promise of another date as soon as she returned from Twin Elms, Nancy said good night and waved from her doorway to the departing boy. As she prepared for bed, she thought of the play, the excellent orchestra, how lucky she was to have Dirk for a date, and what fun it had all been. But then her thoughts turned to Helen Corning and her relatives in the haunted house, Twin Elms.

[106] "I can hardly wait for Monday to come," she murmured to herself as she fell asleep.

[107] The following morning she and her father attended church together. Hannah said she was going to a special service that afternoon and therefore would stay at home during the morning.

[108] "I'll have a good dinner waiting for you," she announced, as the Drews left.

[109] After the service was over, Mr. Drew said he would like to drive down to the waterfront and see what progress had been made on the new bridge. "The railroad is going ahead with construction on the far side of the river," he told Nancy.

[110] "Is the Wharton property on this side?" Nancy asked.

[111] "Yes. And I must get to the truth of this mixed-up situation, so that work can be started on this side too."

[112] Mr. Drew wound among the many streets leading down to the Muskoka River, then took the vehicular bridge across. He turned toward the construction area and presently parked his car. As he and Nancy stepped from the sedan, he looked ruefully at her pumps.

[113] "It's going to be rough walking down to the waterfront," he said. "Perhaps you had better wait here."

[114] "Oh, I'll be all right," Nancy assured him. "I'd like to see what's being done."

[115] Various pieces of large machinery stood about on the high ground—a crane, a derrick, and hydraulic shovels. As the Drews walked toward the river, they passed a large truck. It faced the river and stood at the top of an incline just above two of the four enormous concrete piers which had already been built.

[116] "I suppose there will be matching piers on the opposite side," Nancy mused, as she and her father reached the riverbank. They paused in the space between the two huge abutments. Mr. Drew glanced from side to side as if he had heard something. Suddenly Nancy detected a noise behind them.

[117] Turning, she was horrified to see that the big truck was moving toward them. No one was at the wheel and the great vehicle was gathering speed at every moment.

[118] "Dad!" she screamed.

[119] In the brief second of warning, the truck almost seemed to leap toward the water. Nancy and her father, hemmed in by the concrete piers, had no way to escape being run down.

[120] "Dive!" Mr. Drew ordered.

[121] Without hesitation, he and Nancy made running flat dives into the water, and with arms flailing and legs kicking, swam furiously out of harm's way.

[122] The truck thundered into the water and sank immediately up to the cab. The Drews turned and came back to the shore.

[123] "Whew! That was a narrow escape!" the lawyer exclaimed, as he helped his daughter retrieve her pumps which had come off in the oozy bank. "And what sights we are!" Nancy remarked.

[124] "Indeed we are," her father agreed, as they trudged up the incline. "I'd like to get hold of the workman who was careless enough to leave that heavy truck on the slope without the brake on properly."

[125] Nancy was not so sure that the near accident was the fault of a careless workman. Nathan Comber had warned her that Mr. Drew's life was in danger. The threat might already have been put into action!

[126] CHAPTER III. A Stolen Necklace.

[127] "WE'D better get home in a hurry and change our clothes," said Mr. Drew. "And I'll call the contracting company to tell them what happened."

[128] "And notify the police?" Nancy suggested.

[129] She dropped behind her father and gazed over the surrounding ground for telltale footprints. Presently she saw several at the edge of the spot where the truck had stood.

[130] "Dad!" the young sleuth called out. "I may have found a clue to explain how that truck started downhill."

[131] Her father came back and looked at the footprints. They definitely had not been made by a workman's boots.

[132] "You may think me an old worrier, Dad," Nancy spoke up, "but these footprints, made by a man's business shoes, convince me that somebody deliberately tried to injure us with that truck."

[133] The lawyer stared at his daughter. Then he looked down at the ground. From the size of the shoe and the length of the stride one could easily perceive that the wearer of the shoes was not tall. Nancy asked her father if he thought one of the workmen on the project could be responsible.

[134] "I just can't believe anyone associated with the contracting company would want to injure us," Mr. Drew said.

Nancy reminded her father of Nathan Comber's warning. "It might be one of the property owners, or even Willie Wharton himself."

[135] "Wharton is short and has a small foot," the lawyer conceded. "And I must admit that these look like fresh footprints. As a matter of fact, they show that whoever was here ran off in a hurry. He may have released the brake on the truck, then jumped out and run away."

[136] "Yes," said Nancy. "And that means the attack was deliberate."

[137] Mr. Drew did not reply. He continued walking up the hill, lost in thought. Nancy followed and they climbed into the car. They drove home in silence, each puzzling over the strange incident of the runaway truck. Upon reaching the house, they were greeted by a loud exclamation of astonishment.

[138] "My goodness!" Hannah Gruen cried out. "Whatever in the world happened to you?"

[139] They explained hastily, then hurried upstairs to bathe and change into dry clothes. By the time they reached the first floor again, Hannah had placed sherbet glasses filled with orange and grapefruit slices on the table. All during the delicious dinner of spring lamb, rice and mushrooms, fresh peas and chocolate angel cake with vanilla ice cream, the conversation revolved around the railroad bridge mystery and then the haunted Twin Elms mansion.

[140] "I knew things wouldn't be quiet around here for long," Hannah Gruen remarked with a smile. "Tomorrow you'll both be off on big adventures. I certainly wish you both success."

[141] "Thank you, Hannah," said Nancy. She laughed. "I'd better get a good night's sleep. From now on I may be kept awake by ghosts and strange noises."

[142] "I'm a little uneasy about your going to Twin Elms," the housekeeper told her. "Please promise me that you'll be careful."

[143] "Of course," Nancy replied. Turning to her father, she said, "Pretend I've said the same thing to you about being careful."

[144] The lawyer chuckled and pounded his chest. "You know me. I can be pretty tough when the need arises."

[145] Early the next morning Nancy drove her father to the airport in her blue convertible. Just before she kissed him good-by at the turnstile, he said, "I expect to return on Wednesday, Nancy. Suppose I stop off at Cliffwood and see how you're making out?"

[146] "Wonderful, Dad! I'll be looking for you."

[147] As soon as her father left, Nancy drove directly to Helen Coming's home. The pretty, brunette girl came from the front door of the white cottage, swinging a suitcase. She tossed it into the rear of Nancy's convertible and climbed in.

[148] "I ought to be scared," said Helen. "Goodness only knows what's ahead of us. But right now I'm so happy nothing could upset me."

[149] "What happened?" Nancy asked as she started the car. "Did you inherit a million?"

[150] "Something better than that," Helen replied. "Nancy, I want to tell you a big, big secret. I'm going to be married!"

[151] Nancy slowed the car and pulled to the side of the street. Leaning over to hug her friend, she said, "Why, Helen, how wonderful! Who is he? And tell me all about it. This is rather sudden, isn't it?"

[152] "Yes, it is," Helen confessed. "His name is Jim Archer and he's simply out of this world. I'm a pretty lucky girl. I met him a couple of months ago when he was home on a short vacation. He works for the Tristam Oil Company and has spent two years abroad. Jim will be away a while longer, and then be given a position here in the States."

[153] As Nancy started the car up once more, her eyes twinkled. "Helen Corning, have you been engaged for two months and didn't tell me?"

[154] Helen shook her head. "Jim and I have been corresponding ever since he left. Last night he telephoned from overseas and asked me to marry him." Helen giggled. "I said yes in a big hurry. Then he asked to speak to Dad. My father gave his consent but insisted that our engagement not be announced until Jim's return to this country."

[155] The two girls discussed all sorts of delightful plans for Helen's wedding and before they knew it they had reached the town of Cliffwood.

[156] "My great-grandmother's estate is about two miles out of town," Helen said. "Go down Main Street and turn right at the fork."

[157] Ten minutes later she pointed out Twin Elms, From the road one could see little of the house. A high stone wall ran along the front of the estate and beyond it were many tall trees. Nancy turned into the driveway which twisted and wound among elms, oaks, and maples.

[158] Presently the old Colonial home came into view. Helen said it had been built in 1785 and had been given its name because of the two elm trees which stood at opposite ends of the long building. They had grown to be giants and their foliage was beautiful. The mansion was of red brick and nearly all the walls were covered with ivy. There was a ten-foot porch with tall white pillars at the huge front door.

[159] "It's charming!" Nancy commented as she pulled up to the porch.

[160] "Wait until you see the grounds," said Helen. "There are several old, old buildings. An icehouse, a smokehouse, a kitchen, and servants' cottages."

[161] "The mansion certainly doesn't look spooky from the outside," Nancy commented.

[162] At that moment the great door opened and Aunt Rosemary came outside. "Hello, girls," she greeted them. "I'm so glad to see you."

[163] Nancy felt the warmness of the welcome but thought that it was tinged with worry. She wondered if another "ghost" incident had taken place at the mansion.

[164] The girls took their suitcases from the car and followed Mrs. Hayes inside. Although the furnishings looked rather worn, they were still very beautiful. The high-ceilinged rooms opened off a center hall and in a quick glance Nancy saw lovely damask draperies, satin-covered sofas and chairs, and on the walls, family portraits in large gilt frames of scrollwork design.

[165] Aunt Rosemary went to the foot of the shabbily carpeted stairway, took hold of the handsome mahogany balustrade, and called, "Mother, the girls are here!"

[166] In a moment a slender, frail-looking woman with snow-white hair started to descend the steps. Her face, though older in appearance than Rosemary's, had the same gentle smile. As Miss Flora reached the foot of the stairs, she held out her hands to both girls.

[167] At once Helen said, "I'd like to present Nancy Drew, Miss Flora."

[168] "I'm so glad you could come, my dear," the elderly woman said. "I know that you're going to solve this mystery which has been bothering Rosemary and me. I'm sorry not to be able to entertain you more auspiciously, but a haunted house hardly lends itself to gaiety."

[169] The dainty, yet stately, Miss Flora swept toward a room which she referred to as the parlor. It was opposite the library. She sat down in a high-backed chair and asked everyone else to be seated.

[170] "Mother," said Aunt Rosemary, "we don't have to be so formal with Nancy and Helen. I'm sure they'll understand that we've just been badly frightened." She turned toward the girls. "Something happened a little while ago that has made us very jittery."

[171] "Yes," Miss Flora said. "A pearl necklace of mine was stolen!"

[172] "You don't mean the lovely one that has been in the family so many years!" Helen cried out.

[173] The two women nodded. Then Miss Flora said, "Oh, I probably was very foolish. It's my own fault. While I was in my room, I took the necklace from the hiding place where I usually keep it. The catch had not worked well the last time I wore the pearls and I wanted to examine it. While I was doing this, Rosemary called to me to come downstairs. The gardener was here and wanted to talk about some work. I put the necklace in my dresser drawer. When I returned ten minutes later the necklace wasn't there!"

[174] "How dreadful!" said Nancy sympathetically. "Had anybody come into the house during that time?"

[175] "Not to our knowledge," Aunt Rosemary replied. "Ever since we've had this ghost visiting us we've kept every door and window on the first floor locked all the time."

[176] Nancy asked if the two women had gone out into the garden to speak to their helper. "Mother did," said Mrs. Hayes. "But I was in the kitchen the entire time. If anyone came in the back door, I certainly would have seen the person."

[177] "Is there a back stairway to the second floor?" Nancy asked.

[178] "Yes," Miss Flora answered. "But there are doors at both top and bottom and we keep them locked. No one could have gone up that way."

[179] "Then anyone who came into the house had to go up by way of the front stairs?"

[180] "Yes." Aunt Rosemary smiled a little. "But if anyone had, I would have noticed. You probably heard how those stairs creak when Mother came down. This can be avoided if you hug the wall, but practically no one knows that,"

[181] "May I go upstairs and look around?" Nancy questioned.

[182] "Of course, dear. And I'll show you and Helen to your room," Aunt Rosemary said.

[183] The girls picked up their suitcases and followed the two women up the stairs. Nancy and Helen were given a large, quaint room at the front of the old house over the library. They quickly deposited their luggage, then Miss Flora led the way across the hall to her room, which was directly above the parlor. It was large and very attractive with its canopied mahogany bed and an old-fashioned candlewick spread. The dresser, dressing table, and chairs also were mahogany. Long chintz draperies hung at the windows.

[184] An eerie feeling began to take possession of Nancy. She could almost feel the presence of a ghostly burglar on the premises. Though she tried to shake off the mood, it persisted. Finally she told herself that it was possible the thief was still around. If so, he must be hiding.

[185] Against one wall stood a large walnut wardrobe. Helen saw Nancy gazing at it intently. She went over and whispered, "Do you think there might be someone inside?"

[186] "Who knows?" Nancy replied in a low voice. "Let's find out!"

She walked across the room, and taking hold of the two knobs on the double doors, opened them wide.

[187] CHAPTER IV. Strange Music.

[188] THE ANXIOUS group stared inside the wardrobe. No one stood there. Dresses, suits, and coats hung in an orderly row.

[189] Nancy took a step forward and began separating them. Someone, she thought, might be hiding behind the clothes. The others in the room held their breaths as she made a thorough search.

[190] "No one here!" she finally announced, and a sigh of relief escaped the lips of Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary.

[191] The young sleuth said she would like to make a thorough inspection of all possible hiding places on the second floor. With Helen helping her, they went from room to room, opening wardrobe doors and looking under beds. They did not find the thief.

[192] Nancy suggested that Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary report the theft to the police, but the older woman shook her head. Mrs. Hayes, although she agreed this might be wise, added softly, "Mother just might be mistaken. She's a little forgetful at times about where she puts things."

[193] With this possibility in mind, she and the girls looked in every drawer in the room, under the mattress and pillows, and even in the pockets of Miss Flora's clothes. The pearl necklace was not found. Nancy suggested that she and Helen try to find out how the thief had made his entrance.

Helen led the way outdoors. At once Nancy began to look for footprints. No tracks were visible on the front or back porches, or on any of the walks, which were made of finely crushed stone.

[194] "We'll look in the soft earth beneath the windows," Nancy said. "Maybe the thief climbed in."

[195] "But Aunt Rosemary said all the windows on the first floor are kept locked," Helen objected.

[196] "No doubt," Nancy said. "But I think we should look for footprints just the same."

[197] The girls went from window to window, but there were no footprints beneath any. Finally Nancy stopped and looked thoughtfully at the ivy on the walls.

[198] "Do you think the thief climbed up to the second floor that way?" Helen asked her. "But there'd still be footprints on the ground."

[199] Nancy said that the thief could have carried a plank with him, laid it down, and stepped from the walk to the wall of the house. "Then he could have climbed up the ivy and down again, and gotten back to the walk without leaving any footprints."

[200] Once more Nancy went around the entire house, examining every bit of ivy which wound up from the foundation. Finally she said, "No, the thief didn't get into the house this way."

[201] "Well, he certainly didn't fly in," said Helen. "So how did he enter?"

Nancy laughed. "If I could tell you that I'd have the mystery half solved."

[202] She said that she would like to look around the grounds of Twin Elms. "It may give us a clue as to how the thief got into the house."

[203] As they strolled along, Nancy kept a sharp lookout but saw nothing suspicious. At last they came to a half-crumbled brick walk laid out in an interesting crisscross pattern.

[204] "Where does this walk lead?" Nancy asked.

[205] "Well, I guess originally it went over to Riverview Manor, the next property," Helen replied. "I'll show you that mansion later. The first owner was a brother of the man who built this place."

[206] Helen went on to say that Riverview Manor was a duplicate of Twin Elms mansion. The two brothers had been inseparable companions, but their sons who later lived there had had a violent quarrel and had become lifelong enemies.

[207] "Riverview Manor has been sold several times during the years but has been vacant for a long time."

[208] "You mean no one lives there now?" Nancy asked. As Helen nodded, she added with a laugh, "Then maybe that's the ghost's home!"

[209] "In that case he really must be a ghost," said Helen lightly. "There's not a piece of furniture in the house."

[210] The two girls returned to the Twin Elms mansion and reported their lack of success in picking up a clue to the intruder. Nancy, recalling that many Colonial houses had secret entrances and passageways, asked Miss Flora, "Do you know of any secret entrance to your home that the thief could use?"

[211] She said no, and explained that her husband had been a rather reticent person and had passed away when Rosemary was only a baby. "It's just possible he knew of a secret entrance, but did not want to worry me by telling me about it," Mrs. Turnbull said.

[212] Aunt Rosemary, sensing that her mother was becoming alarmed by the questions, suggested that they all have lunch. The two girls went with her to the kitchen and helped prepare a tasty meal of chicken salad, biscuits, and fruit gelatin.

[213] During the meal the conversation covered several subjects, but always came back to the topic of the mystery. They had just finished eating when suddenly Nancy sat straight up in her chair.

"What's the matter?" Helen asked her.

[214] Nancy was staring out the dining-room door toward the stairway in the hall. Then she turned to Miss Flora. "Did you leave a radio on in your bedroom?"

[215] "Why, no."

"Did you, Aunt Rosemary?"

[216] "No. Neither Mother nor I turned our radios on this morning. Why do—" She stopped speaking, for now all of them could distinctly hear music coming from the second floor.

[217] Helen and Nancy were out of their chairs instantly. They dashed into the hall and up the stairway. The music was coming from Miss Flora's room, and when the girls rushed in, they knew indeed that it was from her radio.

[218] Nancy went over to examine the set. It was an old one and did not have a clock attachment with an automatic control.

[219] "Someone came into this room and turned on the radio!" she stated.

[220] A look of alarm came over Helen's face, but she tried to shake off her nervousness and asked, "Nancy, do you think the radio could have been turned on by remote control? I've heard of such things."

[221] Nancy said she doubted this. "I'm afraid, Helen, that the thief has been in the house all the time. He and the ghost are one and the same person. Oh, I wish we had looked before in the cellar and the attic. Maybe it's not too late. Come on!"

[222] Helen, instead of moving from the room, stared at the fireplace. "Nancy," she said, "do you suppose someone is hiding up there?"

[223] Without hesitation she crossed the room, got down on her knees, and tried to look up the chimney. The damper was closed. Reaching her arm up, Helen pulled the handle to open it.

[224] The next moment she cried out, " Ugh!"

[225]    "Oh, Helen, you poor thing!" Nancy exclaimed, running to her friend's side.

[226] A shower of soot had come down, covering Helen's hair, face, shoulders, and arms.

[227] "Get me a towel, will you, Nancy?" she requested.

[228] Nancy dashed to the bathroom and grabbed two large towels. She wrapped them around her friend, then went with Helen to help her with a shampoo and general cleanup job. Finally Nancy brought her another sports dress.

[229] "I guess my idea about chimneys wasn't so good," Helen stated ruefully. "And we're probably too late to catch the thief."

[230] Nevertheless, she and Nancy climbed the stairs to the attic and looked behind trunks and boxes to see if anyone were hiding. Next, the girls went to the cellar and inspected the various rooms there. Still there was no sign of the thief who had entered Twin Elms.

[231] After Miss Flora had heard the whole story, she gave a nervous sigh. "It's the ghost—there's no other explanation."

[232] "But why," Aunt Rosemary asked, "has a ghost suddenly started performing here? This house has been occupied since 1785 and no ghost was ever reported haunting the place."

[233] "Well, apparently robbery is the motive," Nancy replied. "But why the thief bothers to frighten you is something I haven't figured out yet."

[234] "The main thing," Helen spoke up, "is to catch him!"

[235] "Oh, if we only could!" Miss Flora said, her voice a bit shaky.

[236] The girls were about to pick up the luncheon dishes from the table, to carry them to the kitchen, when the front door knocker sounded loudly.

[237] "Oh, dear," said Miss Flora, "who can that be? Maybe it's the thief and he's come to harm us!"

[238] Aunt Rosemary put an arm around her mother's shoulders. "Please don't worry," she begged. "I think our caller is probably the man who wants to buy Twin Elms." She turned to Nancy and Helen. "But Mother doesn't want to sell for the low price that he is offering."

[239] Nancy said she would go to the door. She set the dishes down and walked out to the hall. Reaching the great door, she flung it open.

Nathan Comber stood there!

[240] CHAPTER V. A Puzzling Interview.

[241] FOR SEVERAL seconds Nathan Comber stared at Nancy in disbelief. "You!" he cried out finally.

[242] "You didn't expect to find me here, did you?" she asked coolly.

[243] "I certainly didn't. I thought you'd taken my advice and stayed with your father. Young people today are so hardhearted!" Comber wagged his head in disgust.

[244] Nancy ignored Comber's remarks. Shrugging, the man pushed his way into the hall. "I know this. If anything happens to your father, you'll never forgive yourself. But you can't blame Nathan Comber! I warned you!"

[245] Still Nancy made no reply. She kept looking at him steadily, trying to figure out what was really in his mind. She was convinced it was not solicitude for her father.

[246] Nathan Comber changed the subject abruptly.

[247] "I'd like to see Mrs. Turnbull and Mrs. Hayes," he said. "Go call them."

[248] Nancy was annoyed by Comber's crudeness, but she turned around and went down the hall to the dining room.

[249] "We heard every word," Miss Flora said in a whisper. "I shan't see Mr. Comber. I don't want to sell this house."

[250] Nancy was amazed to hear this. "You mean he's the person who wants to buy it?"

"Yes."

[251] Instantly Nancy was on the alert. Because of the nature of the railroad deal in which Nathan Comber was involved, she was distrustful of his motives in wanting to buy Twin Elms. It flashed through her mind that perhaps he was trying to buy it at a very low price and planned to sell it off in building lots at a huge profit.

[252] "Suppose I go tell him you don't want to sell," Nancy suggested in a low voice.

But her caution was futile. Hearing footsteps behind her, she turned to see Comber standing in the doorway.

[253] "Howdy, everybody!" he said.

[254] Miss Flora, Aunt Rosemary, and Helen showed annoyance. It was plain that all of them thought the man completely lacking in good manners.

[255] Aunt Rosemary's jaw was set in a grim line, but she said politely, "Helen, this is Mr. Comber. Mr. Comber, my niece, Miss Corning."

[256] "Pleased to meet you," said their caller, extending a hand to shake Helen's.

[257] "Nancy, I guess you've met Mr. Comber," Aunt Rosemary went on.

[258] "Oh, sure!" Nathan Comber said with a somewhat raucous laugh. "Nancy and me, we've met!"

[259] "Only once," Nancy said pointedly.

[260] Ignoring her rebuff, he went on, "Nancy Drew is a very strange young lady. Her father's in great danger and I tried to warn her to stick close to him. Instead of that, she's out here visiting you folks."

[261] "Her father's in danger?" Miss Flora said worriedly.

[262] "Dad says he's not," Nancy replied. "And besides, I'm sure my father would know how to take care of any enemies." She looked straight at Nathan Comber, as if to let him know that the Drews were not easily frightened.

[263] "Well," the caller said, "let's get down to business." He pulled an envelope full of papers from his pocket. "Everything's here—all ready for you to sign, Mrs. Turnbull."

[264] "I don't wish to sell at such a low figure," Miss Flora told him firmly. "In fact, I don't know that I want to sell at all."

[265] Nathan Comber tossed his head. "You'll sell all right," he prophesied. "I've been talking to some of the folks downtown. Everybody knows this old place is haunted and nobody would give you five cents for it—that is, nobody but me."

[266] As he waited for his words to sink in, Nancy spoke up, "If the house is haunted, why do you want it?"

[267] "Well," Comber answered, "I guess I'm a gambler at heart. I'd be willing to put some money into this place, even if there is a ghost parading around." He laughed loudly, then went on, "I declare it might be a real pleasure to meet a ghost and get the better of it!"

[268] Nancy thought with disgust, "Nathan Comber, you're about the most conceited, obnoxious person I've met in a long time."

[269] Suddenly the expression of cunning on the man's face changed completely. An almost wistful look came into his eyes. He sat down on one of the dining-room chairs and rested his chin in his hand.

[270] "I guess you think I'm just a hardheaded business man with no feelings," he said. "The truth is I'm a real softy. I'll tell you why I want this old house so bad. I've always dreamed of owning a Colonial mansion, and having a kinship with early America. You see, my family were poor folks in Europe. Now that I've made a little money, I'd like to have a home like this to roam around in and enjoy its traditions."

[271] Miss Flora seemed to be touched by Comber's story. "I had no idea you wanted the place so much," she said kindly. "Maybe I ought to give it up. It's really too big for us."

[272] As Aunt Rosemary saw her mother weakening, she said quickly, "You don't have to sell this house, Mother. You know you love it. So far as the ghost is concerned, I'm sure that mystery is going to be cleared up. Then you'd be sorry you had parted with Twin Elms. Please don't say yes!"

[273] As Comber gave Mrs. Hayes a dark look, Nancy asked him, "Why don't you buy Riverview Manor? It's a duplicate of this place and is for sale. You probably could purchase it at a lower price than you could this one."

[274] "I've seen that place," the man returned. "It's in a bad state. It would cost me a mint of money to fix it up. No sir. I want this place and I'm going to have it!"

[275] This bold remark was too much for Aunt Rosemary. Her eyes blazing, she said, "Mr. Comber, this interview is at an end. Good-by!"

[276] To Nancy's delight and somewhat to her amusement, Nathan Comber obeyed the "order" to leave. He seemed to be almost meek as he walked through the hall and let himself out the front door.

[277] "Of all the nerve!" Helen burst out.

[278] "Perhaps we shouldn't be too hard on the man," Miss Flora said timidly. "His story is a pathetic one and I can see how he might want to pretend he had an old American family background."

[279] "I'd like to bet a cookie Mr. Comber didn't mean one word of what he was saying," Helen remarked.

[280] "Oh dear, I'm so confused," said Miss Flora, her voice trembling. "Let's all sit down in the parlor and talk about it a little more."

[281] The two girls stepped back as Miss Flora, then Aunt Rosemary, left the dining room. They followed to the parlor and sat down together on the recessed couch by the fireplace. Nancy, on a sudden hunch, ran to a front window to see which direction Comber had taken. To her surprise he was walking down the winding driveway.

[282] "That's strange. Evidently he didn't drive," Nancy told herself. "It's quite a walk into town to get a train or bus to River Heights."

[283] As Nancy mulled over this idea, trying to figure out the answer, she became conscious of creaking sounds. Helen suddenly gave a shriek. Nancy turned quickly.

[284] "Look!" Helen cried, pointing toward the ceiling, and everyone stared upward.

[285] The crystal chandelier had suddenly started swaying from side to side!

[286] "The ghost again!" Miss Flora cried out. She looked as if she were about to faint.

[287] Nancy's eyes quickly swept the room. Nothing else in it was moving, so vibration was not causing the chandelier to sway. As it swung back and forth, a sudden thought came to the young sleuth. Maybe someone in Miss Flora's room above was causing the shaking.

[288] "I'm going upstairs to investigate," Nancy told the others.

[289] Racing noiselessly on tiptoe out of the room and through the hall, she began climbing the stairs, hugging the wall so the steps would not creak. As she neared the top, Nancy was sure she heard a door close. Hurrying along the hall, she burst into Miss Flora's bedroom. No one was in sight!

[290] "Maybe this time the ghost couldn't get away and is in that wardrobe!" Nancy thought.

[291] Helen and her relatives had come up the stairs behind Nancy. They reached the bedroom just as she flung open the wardrobe doors. But for the second time she found no one hiding there.

[292] Nancy bit her lip in vexation. The ghost was clever indeed. Where had he gone? She had given him no time to go down the hall or run into another room. Yet there was no denying the fact that he had been in Miss Flora's room!

[293] "Tell us why you came up," Helen begged her. Nancy told her theory, but suddenly she realized that maybe she was letting her imagination run wild. It was possible, she admitted to the others, that no one had caused the chandelier to shake.

[294] "There's only one way to find out," she said. "I'll make a test."

[295] Nancy asked Helen to go back to the first floor and watch the chandelier. She would try to make it sway by rocking from side to side on the floor above it.

[296] "If this works, then I'm sure we've picked up a clue to the ghost," she said hopefully.

[297] Helen readily agreed and left the room. When Nancy thought her friend had had time to reach the parlor below, she began to rock hard from side to side on the spot above the chandelier.

[298] She had barely started the test when from the first floor Helen Corning gave a piercing scream!

[299] CHAPTER VI. The Gorilla Face.

[300] "SOMETHING has happened to Helen!" Aunt Rosemary cried out fearfully.

[301] Nancy was already racing through the second-floor hallway. Reaching the stairs, she leaped down them two steps at a time. Helen Corning had collapsed in a wing chair in the parlor, her hands over her face.

[302] "Helen! What happened?" Nancy asked, reaching her friend's side.

[303] "Out there! Looking in that window!" Helen pointed to the front window of the parlor next to the hall. "The most horrible face I ever saw!"

[304] "Was it a man's face?" Nancy questioned.

[305] "Oh, I don't know. It looked just like a gorilla!" Helen closed her eyes as if to shut out the memory of the sight.

[306] Nancy did not wait to hear any more. In another second she was at the front door and had yanked it open. Stepping outside, she looked all around. She could see no animal near the house, nor any sign under the window that one had stood there.

[307] Puzzled, the young sleuth hurried down the steps and began a search of the grounds. By this time Helen had collected her wits and come outside. She joined Nancy and together they looked in every outbuilding and behind every clump of bushes on the grounds of Twin Elms. They did not find one footprint or any other evidence to prove that a gorilla or other creature had been on the grounds of the estate.

[308] "I saw it! I know I saw it!" Helen insisted.

[309] "I don't doubt you," Nancy replied.

[310] "Then what explanation is there?" Helen demanded. "You know I never did believe in spooks. But if we have many more of these weird happenings around here, I declare I'm going to start believing in ghosts."

[311] Nancy laughed. "Don't worry, Helen," she said. "There'll be a logical explanation for the face at the window."

[312] The girls walked back to the front door of the mansion. Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary stood there and immediately insisted upon knowing what had happened. As Helen told them, Nancy once more surveyed the outside of the window at which Helen had seen the terrifying face.

[313] "I have a theory," she spoke up. "Our ghost simply leaned across from the end of the porch and held a mask in front of the window." Nancy stretched her arm out to demonstrate how this was possible.

[314] "So that's why he didn't leave any footprints under the window," Helen said. "But he certainly got away from here fast." She suddenly laughed. "He must be on some ghosts' track team."

[315] Her humor, Nancy was glad to see, relieved the tense situation. She had noticed Miss Flora leaning wearily on her daughter's arm.

[316] "You'd better lie down and rest, Mother," Mrs. Hayes advised.

[317] "I guess I will," Aunt Flora agreed.

[318] It was suggested that the elderly woman use Aunt Rosemary's room, while the others continued the experiment with the chandelier.

[319] Helen and Aunt Rosemary went into the parlor and waited as Nancy ascended the front stairway and went to Miss Flora's bedroom. Once more she began to rock from side to side. Downstairs, Aunt Rosemary and her niece were gazing intently at the ceiling.

[320] "Look!" Helen exclaimed, pointing to the crystal chandelier. "It's moving!" In a moment it swung to the left, then back to the right.

[321] "Nancy has proved that the ghost was up in my mother's room!" Aunt Rosemary said excitedly.

[322] After a few minutes the rocking motion of the chandelier slackened and finally stopped. Nancy came hurrying down the steps.

[323] "Did it work?" she called.

[324] "Yes, it did," Aunt Rosemary replied. "Oh, Nancy, we must have two ghosts!"

[325] "Why do you say that?" Helen asked.

[326] "One rocking the chandelier, the other holding the horrible face up to the window. No one could have gone from Miss Flora's room to the front porch in such a short time. Oh, this complicates everything!"

[327] "It certainly does," Nancy agreed. "The question is, are the two ghosts in cahoots? Or, it's just possible, there is only one. He could have disappeared from Miss Flora's room without our seeing him and somehow hurried to the first floor and let himself out the front door while we were upstairs. I'm convinced there is at least one secret entrance into this house, and maybe more. I think our next step should be to try to find it—or them."

[328] "We'd better wash the luncheon dishes first," Aunt Rosemary suggested.

[329] As she and the girls worked, they discussed the mystery, and Mrs. Hayes revealed that she had talked to her mother about leaving the house, whether or not she sold it.

[330] "I thought we might at least go away for a little vacation, but Mother refuses to leave. She says she intends to remain right here until this ghost business is settled."

[331] Helen smiled.  "Nancy, my great-grandmother is a wonderful woman. She has taught me a lot about courage and perseverance. I hope if I ever reach her age, I'll have half as much."

[332] "Yes, she's an example to all of us," Aunt Rosemary concurred.

[333] Nancy nodded. "I agree. I haven't known your mother long, Aunt Rosemary, but I think she is one of the dearest persons I've ever met."

[334] "If Miss Flora won't leave," said Helen, "I guess that means we all stay."

[335] "That's settled," said Nancy with a smile.

After the dishes were put away, the girls were ready to begin their search for a secret entrance into the mansion.

[336] "Let's start with Miss Flora's room," Helen suggested.

[337] "That's a logical place," Nancy replied, and took the lead up the stairway.

[338] Every inch of the wall, which was paneled in maple halfway to the ceiling, was tapped. No hollow sound came from any section of it to indicate an open space behind. The bureau, dressing table, and bed were pulled away from the walls and Nancy carefully inspected every inch of the paneling for cracks or wide seams to indicate a concealed door.

[339] "Nothing yet," she announced, and then decided to inspect the sides of the fireplace.

[340] The paneled sides and brick front revealed nothing. Next, Nancy looked at the sides and rear of the stone interior. She could see nothing unusual, and the blackened stones did not look as if they had ever been disturbed.

[341] She closed the damper which Helen had left open, and then suggested that the searchers transfer to another room on the second floor. But no trace of any secret entrance to the mansion could be found.

[342] "I think we've had enough investigation for one day," Aunt Rosemary remarked.

[343] Nancy was about to say that she was not tired and would like to continue. But she realized that Mrs. Hayes had made this suggestion because her mother was once more showing signs of fatigue and strain.

[344] Helen, who also realized the situation, said, "Let's have an early supper. I'm starved I"

[345] "I am, too," Nancy replied, laughing gaily.

[346] The mood was contagious and soon Miss Flora seemed to have forgotten about her mansion being haunted. She sat in the kitchen while Aunt Rosemary and the girls cooked the meal.

[347] "Um, steak and French fried potatoes, fresh peas, and yummy floating island for dessert," said Helen. "I can hardly wait."

[348] "Fruit cup first," Aunt Rosemary announced, taking a bowl of fruit from the refrigerator.

[349] Soon the group was seated at the table. Tactfully steering the conversation away from the mystery, Nancy asked Miss Flora to tell the group about parties and dances which had been held in the mansion long ago.

[350] The elderly woman smiled in recollection. "I remember one story my husband told me of something that happened when he was a little boy," Miss Flora began. "His parents were holding a masquerade and he was supposed to be in bed fast asleep. His nurse had gone downstairs to talk to some of the servants. The music awakened my husband and he decided it would be great fun to join the guests.

[351] "I’ll put on a costume myself,' he said to himself. He knew there were some packed in a trunk in the attic." Miss Flora paused. "By the way, girls, I think that sometime while you are here you ought to see them. They're beautiful.

[352] "Well, Everett went to the attic, opened the trunk, and searched until he found a soldier's outfit. It was very fancy—red coat and white trousers. He had quite a struggle getting it on and had to turn the coat sleeves way up. The knee britches came to his ankles, and the hat was so large it came down over his ears."

[353] By this time Miss Flora's audience was laughing and Aunt Rosemary remarked, "My father really must have looked funny. Please go on, Mother."

[354] "Little Everett came down the stairs and mingled with the masqueraders at the dance. For a while he wasn't noticed, then suddenly his mother discovered the queer-looking figure."

[355] "And," Aunt Rosemary interrupted, "quickly put him back to bed, I'm sure."

[356] Miss Flora laughed. "That's where you're wrong. The guests thought the whole thing was such fun that they insisted Everett stay. Some of the women danced with him—he went to dancing school and was an excellent dancer. Then they gave him some strawberries and cream and cake."

[357] Helen remarked, "And then put him to bed."

[358] Again Miss Flora laughed. "The poor little fellow never knew that he had fallen asleep while he was eating, and his father had to carry him upstairs. He was put into his little four-poster, costume and all. Of course his nurse was horrified, and I'm afraid that during the rest of the night the poor woman thought she would lose her position. But she didn't. In fact, she stayed with the family until all the children were grown up."

[359] "Oh, that's a wonderful story!" said Nancy.

[360] She was about to urge Miss Flora to tell another story when the telephone rang. Aunt Rosemary answered it, and then called to Nancy, "It's for you."

[361] Nancy hurried to the hall, grabbed up the phone, and said, "Hello." A moment later she cried out, "Dad! How wonderful to hear from you!"

[362] Mr. Drew said that he had not found Willie Wharton and certain clues seemed to indicate that he was not in Chicago, but in some other city.

[363] "I have a few other matters to take care of that will keep me here until tomorrow night. How are you getting along?"

[364] "I haven't solved the mystery yet," his daughter reported. "We've had some more strange happenings. I'll certainly be glad to see you here at Cliffwood. I know you can help me."

[365] "All right, I'll come. But don't try to meet me. The time is too uncertain, and as a matter of fact, I may find that I'll have to stay here in Chicago."

[366] Mr. Drew said he would come out to the mansion by taxi. Briefly Nancy related her experiences at Twin Elms, and after a little more conversation, hung up. When she rejoined the others at the table, she told them about Mr. Drew's promised visit.

[367] "Oh, I'll be so happy to meet your father," said Miss Flora. "We may need legal advice in this mystery."

[368] There was a pause after this remark, with everyone silent for a few moments. Suddenly each one in the group looked at the others, startled. From somewhere upstairs came the plaintive strains of violin music. Had the radio been turned on again by the ghost?

[369] Nancy dashed from the table to find out.

[370] CHAPTER VII. Frightening Eyes.

[371] WITHIN five seconds Nancy had reached the second floor. The violin playing suddenly ceased.

[372] She raced into Miss Flora's room, from which the sounds had seemed to come. The radio was not on. Quickly Nancy felt the instrument to see if it were even slightly warm to prove it had been in use.

[373] "The music wasn't being played on this," she told herself, finding the radio cool.

[374] As Nancy dashed from the room, she almost ran into Helen. "What did you find out?" her friend asked breathlessly.

[375] "Nothing so far," Nancy replied, as she raced into Aunt Rosemary's bedroom to check the bedside radio in there.

[376]  This instrument, too, felt cool to the touch.

[377] She and Helen stood in the center of the room, puzzled frowns creasing their foreheads. "There was music, wasn't there?" Helen questioned.

[378] "I distinctly heard it," Nancy replied. "But where is the person who played the violin? Or put a disk on a record player, or turned on a hidden radio? Helen, I'm positive an intruder comes into this mansion by some secret entrance and tries to frighten us all."

"And succeeds," Helen answered. "It's positively eerie."

"And dangerous," Nancy thought.

[379] "Let's continue our search right after breakfast tomorrow," Helen proposed.

[380] "We will," Nancy responded. "But in the meantime I believe Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary, to say nothing of ourselves, need some police protection."

[381] "I think you're right," Helen agreed. "Let's go downstairs and suggest it to the others."

[382] The girls returned to the first floor and Nancy told Mrs. Hayes and her mother of the failure to find the cause of the violin playing, and what she had in mind.

[383] "Oh dear, the police will only laugh at us," Miss Flora objected.

[384] "Mother dear," said her daughter, "the captain and his men didn't believe us before because they thought we were imagining things. But Nancy and Helen heard music at two different times and they saw the chandelier rock. I'm sure that Captain Rossland will believe Nancy and send a guard out here."

[385] Nancy smiled at Miss Flora. "I shan't ask the captain to believe in a ghost or even hunt for one. I think all we should request at the moment is that he have a man patrol the grounds here at night. I'm sure that we're perfectly safe while we're all awake, but I must admit I'd feel a little uneasy about going to bed wondering what that ghost may do next."

[386] Mrs. Turnbull finally agreed to the plan and Nancy went to the telephone. Captain Rossland readily agreed to send a man out a little later.

[387] "He'll return each night as long as you need him," the officer stated. "And I'll tell him not to ring the bell to tell you when he comes. If there is anyone who breaks into the mansion by a secret entrance, it would be much better if he does not know a guard is on duty."

[388] "I understand," said Nancy.

[389] When Miss Flora, her daughter, and the two girls went to bed, they were confident they would have a restful night. Nancy felt that if there was no disturbance, then it would indicate that the ghost's means of entry into Twin Elms was directly from the outside. "In which case," she thought, "it will mean he saw the guard and didn't dare come inside the house."

[390] The young sleuth's desire for a good night's sleep was rudely thwarted as she awakened about midnight with a start. Nancy was sure she had heard a noise nearby. But now the house was quiet. Nancy listened intently, then finally got out of bed.

[391] "Perhaps the noise I heard came from outdoors," she told herself.

[392] Tiptoeing to a window, so that she would not awaken Helen, Nancy peered out at the moonlit grounds. Shadows made by tree branches, which swayed in a gentle breeze, moved back and forth across the lawn. The scent from a rose garden in full bloom was wafted to Nancy.

[393] "What a heavenly night!" she thought.

[394] Suddenly Nancy gave a start. A furtive figure had darted from behind a tree toward a clump of bushes. Was he the guard or the ghost? She wondered. As Nancy watched intently to see if she could detect any further movements of the mysterious figure, she heard padding footsteps in the hall. In a moment there was a loud knock on her door.

"Nancy! Wake up! Nancy! Come quick!"

[395] The voice was Miss Flora's, and she sounded extremely frightened. Nancy sped across the room, unlocked her door, and opened it wide. By this time Helen was awake and out of bed.

[396] "What happened?" she asked sleepily.

[397] Aunt Rosemary had come into the hall also. Her mother did not say a word; just started back toward her own bedroom. The others followed, wondering what they would find. Moonlight brightened part of the room, but the area near the hall was dark.

[398] "There! Up there!" Miss Flora pointed to a corner of the room near the hall.

[399] Two burning eyes looked down on the watchers!

[400] Instantly Nancy snapped on the wall light and the group gazed upward at a large brown owl perched on the old-fashioned, ornamental picture molding.

[401] "Oh!" Aunt Rosemary cried out. "How did that bird ever get in here?"

[402] The others did not answer at once. Then Nancy, not wishing to frighten Miss Flora, remarked as casually as she could, "It probably came down the chimney."

[403] "But—" Helen started to say.

Nancy gave her friend a warning wink and Helen did not finish the sentence. Nancy was sure she was going to say that the damper had been closed and the bird could not possibly have flown into the room from the chimney. Turning to Miss Flora, Nancy asked whether or not her bedroom door had been locked.

[404] "Oh, yes," the elderly woman insisted. "I wouldn't leave it unlocked for anything."

[405] Nancy did not comment. Knowing that Miss Flora was a bit forgetful, she thought it quite possible that the door had not been locked. An intruder had entered, let the owl fly to the picture molding, then made just enough noise to awaken the sleeping woman.

[406] To satisfy her own memory about the damper, Nancy went over to the fireplace and looked inside. The damper was closed.

[407] "But if the door to the hall was locked," she reasoned, "then the ghost has some other way of getting into this room. And he escaped the detection of the guard."

[408] "I don't want that owl in here all night," Miss Flora broke into Nancy's reverie. "We'll have to get it out."

[409] "That's not going to be easy," Aunt Rosemary spoke up. "Owls have very sharp claws and beaks and they use them viciously on anybody who tries to disturb them. Mother, you come and sleep in my room the rest of the night. We'll chase the owl out in the morning."

[410] Nancy urged Miss Flora to go with her daughter. "I'll stay here and try getting Mr. Owl out of the house. Have you a pair of old heavy gloves?"

[411] "I have some in my room," Aunt Rosemary replied. "They're thick leather. I use them for gardening."

[412] She brought them to Nancy, who put the gloves on at once. Then she suggested that Aunt Rosemary and her mother leave. Nancy smiled. "Helen and I will take over Operation Owl."

[413] As the door closed behind the two women. Nancy dragged a chair to the corner of the room beneath the bird. She was counting on the fact that the bright overhead light had dulled the owl's vision and she would be able to grab it without too much trouble.

[414] "Helen, will you open one of the screens, please?" she requested. "And wish me luck!"

[415] "Don't let that thing get loose," Helen warned as she unfastened the screen and held it far out.

[416] Nancy reached up and by stretching was just able to grasp the bird. In a lightning movement she had put her two hands around its body and imprisoned its claws. At once the owl began to bob its head and peck at her arms above the gloves. Wincing with pain, she stepped down from the chair and ran across the room.

[417] The bird squirmed, darting its beak in first one direction, then another. But Nancy managed to hold the owl in such a position that most of the pecking missed its goal. She held the bird out the window, released it, and stepped back. Helen closed the screen and quickly fastened it.

[418] "Oh!" Nancy said, gazing ruefully at her wrists which now showed several bloody digs from the owl's beak. "I'm glad that's over."

[419] "And I am too," said Helen. "Let's lock Miss Flora's door from the outside, so that ghost can't bring in any owls to the rest of us."

[420] Suddenly Helen grabbed Nancy's arm. "I just thought of something," she said. "There's supposed to be a police guard outside. Yet the ghost got in here without being seen."

[421] "Either that, or there's a secret entrance to this mansion which runs underground, probably to one of the outbuildings on the property."

[422] Nancy now told about the furtive figure she had seen dart from behind a tree. "I must find out right away if he was the ghost or the guard. I'll do a little snooping around. It's possible the guard didn't show up." Nancy smiled. "But if he did, and he's any good, he'll find me!"

[423] "All right," said Helen. "But, Nancy, do be careful. You're really taking awful chances to solve the mystery of Twin Elms."

[424] Nancy laughed softly as she walked back to the girls' bedroom. She dressed quickly, then went downstairs, put the back-door key in her pocket, and let herself out of the house. Stealthily she went down the steps and glided to a spot back of some bushes.

[425] Seeing no one around, she came from behind them and ran across the lawn to a large maple tree. She stood among the shadows for several moments, then darted out toward a building which in Colonial times had been used as the kitchen.

[426] Halfway there, she heard a sound behind her and turned. A man stood in the shadows not ten feet away. Quick as a wink one hand flew to a holster on his hip.

"Halt!" he commanded.

[427] CHAPTER VIII. A Startling Plunge.

[428] NANCY halted as directed and stood facing the man. "Who are you?" she asked.

[429] "I'm a police guard, miss," the man replied. "Just call me Patrick, and who are you?"

[430] Quickly Nancy explained and then asked to see his identification. He opened his coat, pulled out a leather case, and showed her his shield proving that he was a plain-clothes man. His name was Tom Patrick.

[431] "Have you seen anyone prowling around the grounds?" Nancy asked him.

[432]  "Not a soul, miss. This place has been quieter than a cemetery tonight."

[433] When the young sleuth told him about the furtive figure she had seen from the window, the detective laughed. "I believe you saw me," he said. "I guess I'm not so good at hiding as I thought I was."

[434] Nancy laughed lightly. "Anyway, you soon nabbed me," she told him.

[435] The two chatted for several minutes. Tom Patrick told Nancy that people in Cliffwood regarded Mrs. Turnbull as being a little queer. They said that if she thought her house was haunted, it was all in line with the stories of the odd people who had lived there from tune to time during the past hundred years or so.

[436] "Would this rumor make the property difficult to sell?" Nancy questioned the detective.

[437]     "It certainly would."

[438] Nancy said she thought the whole thing was a shame. "Mrs. Turnbull is one of the loveliest women I've ever met and there's not a thing the matter with her, except that once in a while she is forgetful."

[439] "You don't think that some of these happenings we've heard about are just pure imagination?" Tom Patrick asked.

[440] "No, I don't."

[441] Nancy now told him about the owl in Miss Flora's bedroom. "The door was locked, every screen was fastened, and the damper in the chimney closed. You tell me how the owl got in there."

[442] Tom Patrick's eyes opened wide. "You say this happened only a little while ago?" he queried. When Nancy nodded, he added, "Of course I can't be everywhere on these grounds at once, but I've been round and round the building. I've never stopped walking since I arrived. I don't see how anyone could have gotten inside that mansion without my seeing him."

[443] "I'll tell you my theory," said Nancy. "I believe there's a secret underground entrance from some other place on the grounds. It may be in one of these outbuildings. Anyway, tomorrow morning I'm going on a search for it."

[444] "Well, I wish you luck," Tom Patrick said. "And if anything happens during the night, I'll let you know."

Nancy pointed to a window on the second floor. "That's my room," she said. "If you don't have a chance to use the door knocker, just throw a stone up against the screen to alert me. I'll wake up instantly, I know."

[445] The guard promised to do this and Nancy went back into the mansion. She climbed the stairs and for a second time that night undressed. Helen had already gone back to sleep, so Nancy crawled into the big double bed noiselessly.

[446] The two girls awoke the next morning about the same time and immediately Helen asked for full details of what Nancy had learned outdoors the night before. After hearing how her friend had been stopped by the guard, she shivered.

[447] "You might have been in real danger, Nancy, not knowing who he was. You must be more careful. Suppose that man had been the ghost?"

[448] Nancy laughed but made no reply.   The girls went downstairs and started to prepare breakfast. In a few minutes Aunt Rosemary and her mother joined them.

[449] "Did you find out anything more last night?" Mrs. Hayes asked Nancy.

[450] "Only that a police guard named Tom Patrick is on duty," Nancy answered.

[451] As soon as breakfast was over, the young sleuth announced that she was about to investigate all the outbuildings on the estate.

[452] "I'm going to search for an underground passage leading to the mansion. It's just possible that we hear no hollow sounds when we tap the walls, because of double doors or walls where the entrance is."

[453] Aunt Rosemary looked at Nancy intently. "You are a real detective, Nancy. I see now why Helen wanted us to ask you to find our ghost."

[454] Nancy's eyes twinkled. "I may have some instinct for sleuthing," she said, "but unless I can solve this mystery, it won't do any of us much good."

[455] Turning to Helen, she suggested that they put on the old clothes they had brought with them.

[456] Attired in sport shirts and jeans, the girls left the house. Nancy led the way first to the old icehouse. She rolled back the creaking, sliding door and gazed within. The tall, narrow building was about ten feet square. On one side were a series of sliding doors, one above the other.

[457] "I've heard Miss Flora say," Helen spoke up, "that in days gone by huge blocks of ice were cut from the river when it was frozen over and dragged here on a sledge. The blocks were stored here and taken off from the top down through these various sliding doors."

[458] "That story rather rules out the possibility of any underground passage leading from this building," said Nancy. "I presume there was ice in here most of the year."

[459] The floor was covered with dank sawdust, and although Nancy was sure she would find nothing of interest beneath it, still she decided to take a look. Seeing an old, rusted shovel in one corner, she picked it up and began to dig. There was only dirt beneath the sawdust.

[460] "Well, that clue fizzled out," Helen remarked, as she and Nancy started for the next building.

[461] This had once been used as a smokehouse. It, too, had an earthen floor. In one corner was a small fireplace, where smoldering fires of hickory wood had once burned. The smoke had curled up a narrow chimney to the second floor, which was windowless.

[462] "Rows and rows of huge chunks of pork hung up there on hooks to be smoked," Helen explained, "and days later turned into luscious hams and bacon."

[463] There was no indication of a secret opening and Nancy went outside the small, two-story, peak-roofed structure and walked around. Up one side of the brick building and leading to a door above were the remnants of a ladder. Now only the sidepieces which had held the rungs remained.

[464] "Give me a boost, will you, Helen?" Nancy requested. "I want to take a look inside."

[465] Helen squatted on the ground and Nancy climbed to her shoulders. Then Helen, bracing her hands against the wall,, straightened up. Nancy opened the half-rotted wooden door.

[466] "No ghost here!" she announced.

[467] Nancy jumped to the ground and started for the servants' quarters. But a thorough inspection of this brick-and-wood structure failed to reveal a clue to a secret passageway.

[468] There was only one outbuilding left to investigate, which Helen said was the old carriage house. This was built of brick and was fairly large. No carriages stood on its wooden floor, but around the walls hung old harnesses and reins. Nancy paused a moment to examine one of the bridles. It was set with two hand-painted medallions of women's portraits.

[469] Suddenly her reflection was interrupted by a scream. Turning, she was just in time to see Helen plunge through a hole in the floor. In a flash Nancy was across the carriage house and looking down into a gaping hole where the rotted floor had given way.

[470] "Helen!" she cried out in alarm.

[471] "I'm all right," came a voice from below. "Nice and soft down here. Please throw me your flash."

[472] Nancy removed the flashlight from the pocket of her jeans and tossed it down.

[473] "I thought maybe I'd discovered something," Helen said. "But this is just a plain old hole. Give me a hand, will you, so I can climb up?"

[474] Nancy lay flat on the floor and with one arm grabbed a supporting beam that stood in the center of the carriage house. Reaching down with the other arm, she assisted Helen in her ascent.

[475] "We'd better watch our step around here," Nancy said as her friend once more stood beside her.

[476] "You're so right," Helen agreed, brushing dirt off her jeans. Helen's plunge had given Nancy an idea that there might be other openings in the floor and that one of them could be an entrance to a subterranean passage. But though she flashed her light over every inch of the carriage-house floor, she could discover nothing suspicious.

[477] "Let's quit!" Helen suggested. "I'm a mess, and besides, I'm hungry."

[478] "All right," Nancy agreed. "Are you game to search the cellar this afternoon?"

"Oh, sure."

[479] After lunch they started to investigate the storerooms in the cellar. There was a cool stone room where barrels of apples had once been kept. There was another, formerly filled with bags of whole-wheat flour, barley, buckwheat, and oatmeal.

[480] "And everything was grown on the estate," said Helen.

[481] "Oh, it must have been perfectly wonderful," Nancy said. "I wish we could go back in time and see how life was in those days!"

[482] "Maybe if we could, we'd know how to find that ghost," Helen remarked. Nancy thought so too.

[483] As the girls went from room to room in the cellar, Nancy beamed her flashlight over every inch of wall and floor. At times, the young sleuth's pulse would quicken when she thought she had discovered a trap door or secret opening. But each time she had to admit failure—there was no evidence of either one in the cellar.

[484] "This has been a discouraging day," Nancy remarked, sighing. "But I'm not giving up."

[485]    Helen felt sorry for her friend. To cheer Nancy, she said with a laugh, "Storeroom after storeroom but no room to store a ghost!"

[486] Nancy had to laugh, and together the two girls ascended the stairway to the kitchen. After changing their clothes, they helped Aunt Rosemary prepare the evening dinner. When the group had eaten and later gathered in the parlor, Nancy reminded the others that she expected her father to arrive the next day.

[487] "Dad didn't want me to bother meeting him, but I just can't wait to see him. I think I'll meet all the trains from Chicago that stop here."

[488] "I hope your father will stay with us for two or three days," Miss Flora spoke up. "Surely he'll have some ideas about our ghost."

[489] "And good ones, too," Nancy said. "If he's on the early train, he'll have breakfast with us. I'll meet it at eight o'clock."

[490] But later that evening Nancy's plans were suddenly changed. Hannah Gruen telephoned her to say that a man at the telegraph office had called the house a short time before to read a message from Mr. Drew. He had been unavoidably detained and would not arrive Wednesday.

[491] "In the telegram your father said that he will let us know when he will arrive," the housekeeper added.

[492] "I'm disappointed," Nancy remarked, "but I hope this delay means that Dad is on the trail of Willie Wharton!"

[493] "Speaking of Willie Wharton," said Hannah, "I heard something about him today."

[494] "What was that?" Nancy asked.

[495] "That he was seen down by the river right here in River Heights a couple of days ago!"

[496] CHAPTER IX. A Worrisome Delay.

[497] "You say Willie Wharton was seen in River Heights down by the river?" Nancy asked unbelievingly.

[498] "Yes," Hannah replied. "I learned it from our postman, Mr. Ritter, who is one of the people that sold property to the railroad. As you know, Nancy, Mr. Ritter is very honest and reliable. Well, he said he'd heard that some of the property owners were trying to horn in on this deal of Willie Wharton's for getting more money. But Mr. Ritter wouldn't have a thing to do with it—calls it a holdup."

[499] "Did Mr. Ritter himself see Willie Wharton?" Nancy asked eagerly.

[500] "No," the housekeeper replied. "One of the other property, owners told him Willie was around."

[501] "That man could be mistaken," Nancy suggested.

[502] "Of course he might," Hannah agreed. "And I'm inclined to think he is. If your father is staying over in Chicago, it must be because of Willie Wharton."

[503] Nancy did not tell Hannah what was racing through her mind. She said good night cheerfully, but actually she was very much worried.

[504] "Maybe Willie Wharton was seen down by the river," she mused. "And maybe Dad was 'unavoidably detained' by an enemy of his in connection with the railroad bridge project. One of the dissatisfied property owners might have followed him to Chicago."

Or, she reflected further, it was not inconceivable that Mr. Drew had found Willie Wharton, only to have Willie hold the lawyer a prisoner.

[505] As Nancy sat lost in anxious thought, Helen came into the hall. "Something the matter?" she asked.

[506] "I don't know," Nancy replied, "but I have a feeling there is. Dad telegraphed to say that he wouldn't be here tomorrow. Instead of wiring, he always phones me or Hannah or his office when he is away and it seems strange that he didn't do so this time."

[507] "You told me a few days ago that your father had been threatened," said Helen. "Are you afraid it has something to do with that?"

"Yes, I am."

[508] "Is there anything I can do?" Helen offered.

[509] "Thank you, Helen, but I think not. There isn't anything I can do either. We'll just have to wait and see what happens. Maybe I'll hear from Dad again."

[510] Nancy looked so downcast that Helen searched her mind to find something which would cheer her friend. Suddenly Helen had an idea and went to speak to Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary about it.

[511] "I think it's a wonderful plan if Nancy will do it," Aunt Rosemary said.

[512] Helen called Nancy from the hall and proposed that they all go to the attic to look in the big trunk containing the old costumes.

[513] "We might even put them on," Miss Flora proposed, smiling girlishly.

[514] "And you girls could dance the minuet," said Aunt Rosemary enthusiastically. "Mother plays the old spinet very well. Maybe she would play a minuet for you."

[515] "I love your idea," said Nancy. She knew that the three were trying to boost her spirits and she appreciated it. Besides, what they had proposed sounded like fun.

[516] All of them trooped up the creaky attic stairs. In their haste, none of the group had remembered to bring flashlights.

[517] "I'll go downstairs and get a couple," Nancy offered.

"Never mind," Aunt Rosemary spoke up.

"There are some candles and holders right here. We keep them for emergencies."

[518] She lighted two white candles which stood in old-fashioned, saucer-type brass holders and led the way to the costume trunk.

[519] As Helen lifted the heavy lid, Nancy exclaimed in delight, "How beautiful the clothes are!"

[520] She could see silks, satins, and laces at one side. At the other was a folded-up rose velvet robe. She and Helen lifted out the garments and held them up.

[521] "They're really lovelier than our formal dance clothes today," Helen remarked. "Especially the men's!"

[522] Miss Flora smiled.  "And a lot more flattering!"

[523] The entire trunk was unpacked, before the group selected what they would wear.

[524] "This pale-green silk gown with the panniers would look lovely on you, Nancy," Miss Flora said. "And I'm sure it's just the right size, too."

[525] Nancy surveyed the tiny waist of the ball gown. "I'll try it on," she said. Then laughingly she added, "But I'll probably have to hold my breath to close it in the middle. My, but the women in olden times certainly had slim waistlines!"

[526] Helen was holding up a man's purple velvet suit. It had knee breeches and the waistcoat had a lace-ruffled front. There were a tricorn hat, long white stockings, and buckled slippers to complete the costume.

[527]   "I think I'll wear this and be your partner, Nancy," Helen said.

[528] Taking off her pumps, she slid her feet into the buckled slippers. The others laughed aloud. A man with a foot twice the size of Helen's had once worn the slippers!

[529] "Never mind. I'll stuff the empty space with paper," Helen announced gaily.

[530] Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary selected gowns for themselves, then opened a good-sized box at the bottom of the trunk. It contained various kinds of wigs worn in Colonial times. All were pure white and fluffy.

[531] Carrying the costumes and wigs, the group descended to their bedrooms, where they changed into the fancy clothes, then went to the first floor. Miss Flora led the way into the room across the hall from the parlor. She said it once had been the drawing room. Later it had become a library, but the old spinet still stood in a corner.

[532] Miss Flora sat down at the instrument and began to play Beethoven's "Minuet." Aunt Rosemary sat down beside her.

[533] Nancy and Helen, dubbed by the latter, Master and Mistress Colonial America, began to dance. They clasped their right hands high in the air, then took two steps backward and made little bows. They circled, then strutted, and even put in a few steps with which no dancers in Colonial times would have been familiar.

[534] Aunt Rosemary giggled and clapped. "I wish President Washington would come to see you," she said, acting out her part in the entertainment. "Mistress Nancy, prithee do an encore and Master Corning, wilt thou accompany thy fair lady?"

[535] The girls could barely keep from giggling. Helen made a low bow to her aunt, her tricorn in her hand, and said, "At your service, my lady. Your every wish is my command!"

[536] The minuet was repeated, then as Miss Flora stopped playing, the girls sat down.

[537] "Oh, that was such fun!" said Nancy. "Some time I'd like to— Listen!" she commanded suddenly.

[538] From outside the house they could hear loud shouting. "Come here! You in the house! Come here!"

[539] Nancy and Helen dashed from their chairs to the front door. Nancy snapped on the porch light and the two girls raced outside.

[540] "Over here!" a man's voice urged.

[541] Nancy and Helen ran down the steps and out onto the lawn. Just ahead of them stood Tom Patrick, the police detective. In a viselike grip he was holding a thin, bent-over man whom the girls judged to be about fifty years of age.

[542] "Is this your ghost?" the guard asked.

[543] His prisoner was struggling to free himself but was unable to get loose. The girls hurried forward to look at the man.

[544] "I caught him sneaking along the edge of the grounds," Tom Patrick announced.

[545] "Let me go!" the man cried out angrily. "I'm no ghost. What are you talking about?"

[546] "You may not be a ghost," the detective said, "but you could be the thief who has been robbing this house."

[547] "What?" his prisoner exclaimed. "I'm no thief I live around here. Anyone will tell you I'm okay."

[548] "What's your name and where do you live?" the detective prodded. He let the man stand up straight but held one of his arms firmly.

[549] "My name's Albert Watson and I live over on Tuttle Road."

[550] "What were you doing on this property?"

Albert Watson said he had been taking a short cut home. His wife had taken their car for the evening.

[551] "I'd been to a friend's house. You can call him and verify what I'm saying. And you can call my wife, too. Maybe she's home now and she'll come and get me."

[552] The guard reminded Albert Watson that he had not revealed why he was sneaking along the ground.

[553] "Well," the prisoner said, "it was because of you. I heard downtown that there was a detective patrolling this place and I didn't want to bump into you. I was afraid of just what did happen."

The man relaxed a little. "I guess you're a pretty good guard at that."

[554] Detective Patrick let go of Albert Watson's arm. "Your story sounds okay, but we'll go in the house and do some telephoning to find out if you're telling the truth."

[555] "You'll find out all right. Why, I'm even a notary public! They don't give a notary's license to dishonest folks!" the trespasser insisted, Then he stared at Nancy and Helen, "What are you doing in those funny clothes?"

[556] "We—are—we were having a little costume party," Helen responded. In the excitement she and Nancy had forgotten what they were wearing!

[557] The two girls started for the house, with the men following. When Mr. Watson and the guard saw Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary also in costume they gazed at the women in amusement.

[558] Nancy introduced Mr. Watson. Miss Flora said she knew of him, although she had never met the man. Two phone calls by the guard confirmed Watson's story. In a little while his wife arrived at Twin Elms to drive her husband home, and Detective Patrick went back to his guard duty.

[559] Aunt Rosemary then turned out all the lights on the first floor and she, Miss Flora, and the girls went upstairs. Bedroom doors were locked, and everyone hoped there would be no disturbance during the night

[560] "It was a good day, Nancy," said Helen, yawning, as she climbed into bed.

[561] "Yes, it was," said Nancy. "Of course, I'm a little disappointed that we aren't farther along solving the mystery but maybe by this time tomorrow—" She looked toward Helen who did not answer. She was already sound asleep.

[562] Nancy herself was under the covers a few minutes later. She lay staring at the ceiling, going over the various events of the past two days. As her mind recalled the scene in the attic when they were pulling costumes from the old trunk, she suddenly gave a start.

[563] "That section of wall back of the trunk!" she told herself. "The paneling looked different somehow from the rest of the attic wall. Maybe it's movable and leads to a secret exit! Tomorrow I'll find out!"

[564] CHAPTER X. The Midnight Watch.

[565] As SOON as the two girls awoke the next morning, Nancy told Helen her plan.

[566] "I'm with you," said Helen. "Oh, I do wish we could solve the mystery of the ghost! I'm afraid that it's beginning to affect Miss Flora's health and yet she won't leave Twin Elms."

[567] "Maybe we can get Aunt Rosemary to keep her in the garden most of the day," Nancy suggested. "It's perfectly beautiful outside. We might even serve lunch under the trees."

[568] "I'm sure they'd love that," said Helen. "As soon as we get downstairs, let's propose it."

[569] Both women liked the suggestion. Aunt Rosemary had guessed their strategy and was appreciative of it.

[570] "I'll wash and dry the dishes," Nancy offered when breakfast was over. "Miss Flora, why don't you and Aunt Rosemary go outside right now and take advantage of this lovely sunshine?"

[571] The frail, elderly woman smiled. There were deep circles under her eyes, indicating that she had had a sleepless night.

[572] "And I'll run the vacuum cleaner around and dust this first floor in less than half an hour," Helen said merrily.

[573] Her relatives caught the spirit of her enthusiasm and Miss Flora remarked, "I wish you girls lived here all the time. Despite our troubles, you have brought a feeling of gaiety back into our lives."

[574] Both girls smiled at the compliment. As soon as the two women had gone outdoors, the girls set to work with a will. At the end of the allotted half hour, the first floor of the mansion was spotless. Nancy and Helen next went to the second floor, quickly made the beds, and tidied the bathrooms.

[575] "And now for that ghost!" said Helen, brandishing her flashlight.

[576] Nancy took her own from a bureau drawer.

[577] "Let's see if we can figure out how to climb these attic stairs without making them creak," Nancy suggested. "Knowing how may come in handy some time."

[578] This presented a real challenge. Every inch of each step was tried before the girls finally worked out a pattern to follow in ascending the stairway noiselessly.

[579] Helen laughed, "This will certainly be a memory test, Nancy. I'll rehearse our directions. First step, put your foot to the left near the wall. Second step, right center. Third step, against the right wall. I'll need three feet to do that!"

[580] Nancy laughed too. "For myself, I think I'll skip the second step. Let's see. On the fourth and fifth it's all right to step in the center, but on the sixth you hug the left wall, on the seventh, the right wall—"

[581] Helen interrupted. "But if you step on the eighth any place, it will creak. So you skip it."

[582] "Nine, ten, and eleven are okay," Nancy recalled. "But from there to fifteen at the top we're in trouble."

[583] "Let's see if I remember," said Helen. "On twelve, you go left, then right, then right again. How can you do that without a jump and losing your balance and tumbling down?"

[584] "How about skipping fourteen and then stretching as far as you can to reach the top one at the left where it doesn't squeak," Nancy replied. "Let's go!"

[585] She and Helen went back to the second floor and began what was meant to be a silent ascent. But both of them made so many mistakes at first the creaking was terrific. Finally, however, the girls had the silent spots memorized perfectly and went up noiselessly.

[586] Nancy clicked on her flashlight and swung it onto the nearest wood-paneled wall. Helen stared at it, then remarked, "This isn't made of long panels from ceiling to floor. It's built of small pieces."

[587] "That's right," said Nancy. "But see if you don't agree with me that the spot back of the costume trunk near the chimney looks a little different. The grain doesn't match the other wood."

[588] The girls crossed the attic and Nancy beamed her flashlight over the suspected paneling.

[589] "It does look different," Helen said. "This could be a door, I suppose. But there's no knob or other hardware on it." She ran her finger over a section just above the floor, following the cracks at the edge of a four-by-two-and-a-half-foot space.

[590] "If it's a secret door," said Nancy, "the knob is on the other side."

[591] "How are we going to open it?" Helen questioned.

[592] "We might try prying the door open," Nancy proposed. "But first I want to test it."

[593] She tapped the entire panel with her knuckles. A look of disappointment came over her face. "There's certainly no hollow space behind it," she said.

[594] "Let's make sure," said Helen. "Suppose I go downstairs and get a screw driver and hammer? We'll see what happens when we drive the screw driver through this crack."

[595] "Good idea, Helen."

[596] While she was gone, Nancy inspected the rest of the attic walls and floor. She did not find another spot which seemed suspicious. By this time Helen had returned with the tools. Inserting the screw driver into one of the cracks, she began to pound on the handle of it with the hammer.

Nancy watched hopefully. The screw driver went through the crack very easily but immediately met an obstruction on the other side. Helen pulled the screw driver out. "Nancy, you try your luck."

[597] The young sleuth picked a different spot, but the results were the same. There was no open space behind that portion of the attic wall.

[598] "My hunch wasn't so good," said Nancy.

Helen suggested that they give up and go downstairs. "Anyway, I think the postman will be here soon." She smiled. "I'm expecting a letter from Jim. Mother said she would forward all my mail."

[599] Nancy did not want to give up the search yet. But she nodded in agreement and waved her friend toward the stairs. Then the young detective sat down on the floor and cupped her chin in her hands. As she stared ahead, Nancy noticed that Helen, in her eagerness to meet the postman, had not bothered to go quietly down the attic steps. It sounded as if Helen had picked the squeakiest spot on each step!

[600] Nancy heard Helen go out the front door and suddenly realized that she was in the big mansion all alone. "That may bring the ghost on a visit," she thought. "If he is around, he may think I went outside with Helen! And I may learn where the secret opening is!"

[601] Nancy sat perfectly still, listening intently. Suddenly she flung her head up. Was it her imagination, or did she hear the creak of steps? She was not mistaken. Nancy strained her ears, trying to determine from where the sounds were coming.

[602] "I'm sure they're not from the attic stairs or the main staircase. And not the back stairway. Even if the ghost was in the kitchen and unlocked the door to the second floor, he'd know that the one at the top of the stairs was locked from the other side."

[603] Nancy's heart suddenly gave a leap. She was positive that the creaking sounds were coming from somewhere behind the attic wall!

"A secret staircase!" she thought excitedly. "Maybe the ghost is entering the second floor!"

[604] Nancy waited until the sounds stopped, then she got to her feet, tiptoed noiselessly down the attic steps and looked around. She could hear nothing. Was the ghost standing quietly in one of the bedrooms? Probably Miss Flora's?

[605] Treading so lightly that she did not make a sound, Nancy peered into each room as she reached it. But no one was in any of them.

[606] "Maybe he's on the first floor!" Nancy thought.

[607] She descended the main stairway, hugging the wall so she would not make a sound. Reaching the first floor, Nancy peered into the parlor. No one was there. She looked in the library, the dining room, and the kitchen. She saw no one.

[608] "Well, the ghost didn't come into the house after all," Nancy concluded. "He may have intended to, but changed his mind."

[609] She felt more certain than at any time, however, that there was a secret entrance to Twin Elms Mansion from a hidden stairway. But how to find it? Suddenly the young sleuth snapped her fingers. "I know what I'll do! I'll set a trap for that ghost!"

[610] She reflected that he had taken jewelry, but those thefts had stopped. Apparently he was afraid to go to the second floor.

[611] "I wonder if anything is missing from the first floor," she mused. "Maybe he has taken silverware or helped himself to some food."

[612] Going to the back door, Nancy opened it and called to Helen, who was now seated in the garden with Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary. "What say we start lunch?" she called, not wishing to distress Miss Flora by bringing up the subject of the mystery.

[613] "Okay," said Helen. In a few moments she joined Nancy, who asked if her friend had received a letter.

[614] Helen's eyes sparkled. "I sure did. Oh, Nancy, I can hardly wait for Jim to get home!"

Nancy smiled. "The way you describe him, I can hardly wait to see him myself." Then she told Helen the real reason she had called her into the kitchen. She described the footsteps on what she was sure was a hidden, creaking stairway, then added, "If we discover that food or something else is missing we'll know he's been here again."

[615] Helen offered to inspect the flat silver. "I know approximately how many pieces should be in the buffet drawer," she said.

[616] "And I'll look over the food supplies," Nancy suggested. "I have a pretty good idea what was in the refrigerator and on the pantry shelf."

[617] It was not many minutes before each of the girls discovered articles missing. Helen said that nearly a dozen teaspoons were gone and Nancy figured that several cans of food, some eggs, and a quart of milk had been taken.

[618] "It just seems impossible to catch that thief," Helen said with a sigh.

[619] On a sudden hunch Nancy took down from the wall a memo pad and pencil which hung there. Putting a finger to her lips to indicate that Helen was not to comment, Nancy wrote on the sheet:

[620] "I think the only way to catch the ghost is to trap him. I believe he has one or more microphones hidden some place and that he hears all our plans."

[621] Nancy looked up at Helen, who nodded silently. Nancy continued to write, "I don't want to worry Miss Flora or Aunt Rosemary, so let's keep our plans a secret. I suggest that we go to bed tonight as usual and carry on a conversation about our plans for tomorrow. But actually we won't take off our clothes. Then about midnight let's tiptoe downstairs to watch. I'll wait in the kitchen. Do you want to stay in the living room?"

[622] Again Helen nodded. Nancy, thinking that they had been quiet too long, and that if there was an eavesdropper nearby he might become suspicious, said aloud, "What would Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary like for lunch, Helen?"

[623] "Why, uh—" Helen found it hard to transfer to the new subject. "They—uh—both love soup."

[624] "Then I'll make cream of chicken soup," said Nancy. "Hand me a can of chicken and rice, will you? And I'll get the milk."

[625] As Helen was doing this, Nancy lighted a match, held her recently written note over the sink, and set fire to the paper.

[626] Helen smiled. "Nancy thinks of everything," she said to herself.

[627] The girls chatted gaily as they prepared the food and finally carried four trays out to the garden. They did not mention their midnight plan. The day in the garden was proving to be most beneficial to Miss Flora, and the girls were sure she would sleep well that night.

[628] Nancy's plan was followed to the letter. Just as the grandfather clock in the hall was striking midnight, Nancy arrived in the kitchen and sat down to await developments. Helen was posted in a living-room chair near the hall doorway. Moonlight streamed into both rooms but the girls had taken seats in the shadows.

[629] Helen was mentally rehearsing the further instructions which Nancy had written to her during the afternoon. The young sleuth had suggested that if Helen should see anyone, she was to run to the front door, open it, and yell "Police!" At the same time she was to try to watch where the intruder disappeared.

[630] The minutes ticked by. There was not a sound in the house. Then suddenly Nancy heard the front door open with a bang and Helen's voice yell loudly and clearly:

"Police! Help! Police!"

[631] CHAPTER XI. An Elusive Ghost

[632] BY THE time Nancy reached the front hall, Tom Patrick, the police guard, had rushed into the house. "Here I am!" he called. "What's the matter?"

[633] Helen led the way into the living room, and switched on the chandelier light.

[634] "That sofa next to the fireplace!" she said in a trembling voice. "It moved! I saw it move!"

[635] "You mean somebody moved it?" the detective asked.

[636] "I—I don't know," Helen replied. "I couldn't see anybody."

[637] Nancy walked over to the old-fashioned sofa, set in the niche alongside the fireplace. Certainly the piece was in place now. If the ghost had moved it, he had returned the sofa to its original position.

[638] "Let's pull it out and see what we can find," Nancy suggested.

[639] She tugged at one end, while the guard pulled the other. It occurred to Nancy that a person who moved it alone would have to be very strong.

[640] "Do you think your ghost came up through a trap door or something?" the detective asked.

[641] Neither of the girls replied. They had previously searched the area, and even now as they looked over every inch of the floor and the three walls surrounding the high sides of the couch, they could detect nothing that looked like an opening.

[642] By this time Helen looked sheepish. "I—I guess I was wrong," she said finally. Turning to the police guard, she said, "I'm sorry to have taken you away from your work."

[643] "Don't feel too badly about it. But I'd better get back to my guard duty," the man said, and left the house.

[644] "Oh, Nancy!" Helen cried out.  "I'm so sorry!"

[645] She was about to say more but Nancy put a finger to her lips. They could use the same strategy for trapping the thief at another time. In case the thief might be listening, Nancy did not want to give away their secret.

[646] Nancy felt that after all the uproar the ghost would not appear again that night. She motioned to Helen that they would go quietly upstairs and get some sleep. Hugging the walls of the stairway once more, they ascended noiselessly, tiptoed to their room, and got into bed.

[647] "I'm certainly glad I didn't wake up Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary," said Helen sleepily as she whispered good night.

[648] Though Nancy had been sure the ghost would not enter the mansion again that night, she discovered in the morning that she had been mistaken. More food had been stolen sometime between midnight and eight o'clock when she and Helen started breakfast. Had the ghost taken it for personal use or only to worry the occupants of Twin Elms?

[649] "I missed my chance this time," Nancy murmured to her friend. "After this, I'd better not trust what that ghost's next move may be!"

[650] At nine o'clock Hannah Gruen telephoned the house. Nancy happened to answer the ring and after the usual greetings was amazed to hear Hannah say, "I'd like to speak to your father."

[651] "Why, Dad isn't here!" Nancy told her. "Don't you remember—the telegram said he wasn't coming?"

[652] "He's not there!" Hannah exclaimed. "Oh, this is bad, Nancy— very bad."

[653] "What do you mean, Hannah?" Nancy asked fearfully.

[654] The housekeeper explained that soon after receiving the telegram on Tuesday evening, Mr. Drew himself had phoned. "He wanted to know if you were still in Cliffwood, Nancy. When I told him yes, he said he would stop off there on his way home Wednesday."

[655] Nancy was frightened, but she asked steadily, "Hannah, did you happen to mention the telegram to him?"

[656] "No, I didn't," the housekeeper replied. "I didn't think it was necessary."

[657] "Hannah darling," said Nancy, almost on the verge of tears, "I'm afraid that telegram was a hoax!"

[658] "A hoax!" Mrs. Gruen cried out.

[659] "Yes. Dad's enemies sent it to keep me from meeting him!"

[660] "Oh, Nancy," Hannah wailed, "You don't suppose those enemies that Mr. Comber warned you about have waylaid your father and are keeping him prisoner?"

[661] "I'm afraid so," said Nancy. Her knees began to quake and she sank into the chair alongside the telephone table.

[662] "What'll we do?" Hannah asked. "Do you want me to notify the police?"

[663] "Not yet. Let me do a little checking first."

[664] "All right, Nancy. But let me know what happens."

[665] "I will."

[666] Nancy put the phone down, then looked at the various telephone directories which lay on the table. Finding one which contained River Heights numbers, she looked for the number of the telegraph office and put in a call. She asked the clerk who answered to verify that there had been a telegram from Mr. Drew on Tuesday.

After a few minutes wait, the reply came. "We have no record of such a telegram."

[667] Nancy thanked the clerk and hung up. By this time her hands were shaking with fright. What had happened to her father?

[668] Getting control of herself, Nancy telephoned in turn to the airport, the railroad station, and the bus lines which served Cliffwood. She inquired about any accidents which might have occurred on trips from Chicago the previous day or on Tuesday night. In each case she was told there had been none.

[669] "Oh, what shall I do?" Nancy thought in dismay.

[670] Immediately an idea came to her and she put in a call to the Chicago hotel where her father had registered. Although she thought it unlikely, it was just possible that he had changed his mind again and was still there. But a conversation with the desk clerk dashed this hope.

[671] "No, Mr. Drew is not here. He checked out Tuesday evening. I don't know his plans, but I'll connect you with the head porter. He may be able to help you."

[672] In a few seconds Nancy was asking the porter what he could tell her to help clear up the mystery of her father's disappearance. "All I know, miss, is that your father told me he was taking a sleeper train and getting off somewhere Wednesday morning to meet his daughter."

[673] "Thank you. Oh, thank you very much," said Nancy. "You've helped me a great deal."

[674] So her father had taken the train home and probably had reached the Cliffwood station! Next she must find out what had happened to him after that!

[675] Nancy told Aunt Rosemary and Helen what she had learned, then got in her convertible and drove directly to the Cliffwood station. There she spoke to the ticket agent. Unfortunately, he could not identify Mr. Drew from Nancy's description as having been among the passengers who got off either of the two trains arriving from Chicago on Wednesday.

[676] Nancy went to speak to the taximen. Judging by the line of cabs, she decided that all the drivers who served the station were on hand at the moment. There had been no outgoing trains for nearly an hour and an incoming express was due in about fifteen minutes.

[677] "I'm in luck," the young detective told herself. "Surely one of these men must have driven Dad."

She went from one to another, but each of them denied having carried a passenger of Mr. Drew's description the day before.

[678] By this time Nancy was in a panic. She hurried inside the station to a telephone booth and called the local police station.  Nancy asked to speak to the captain and in a moment he came on the line.

[679] "Captain Rossland speaking," he said crisply.

[680] Nancy poured out her story. She told of the warning her father had received in River Heights and her fear that some enemy of his was now detaining the lawyer against his will.

[681] "This is very serious, Miss Drew," Captain Rossland stated. "I will put men on the case at once," he said.

[682] As Nancy left the phone booth, a large, gray-haired woman walked up to her. "Pardon me, miss, but I couldn't help overhearing what you said. I believe maybe I can help you."

[683] Nancy was surprised and slightly suspicious. Maybe this woman was connected with the abductors and planned to make Nancy a prisoner too by promising to take her to her father!

[684] "Don't look so frightened," the woman said, smiling. "All I wanted to tell you is that I'm down here at the station every day to take a train to the next town. I'm a nurse and I'm on a case over there right now."

[685] "I see," Nancy said.

[686] "Well, yesterday I was here when the Chicago train came in. I noticed a tall, handsome man—such as you describe your father to be—step off the train. He got into the taxi driven by a man named Harry. I have a feeling that for some reason the cabbie isn't telling the truth. Let's talk to him."

[687] Nancy followed the woman, her heart beating furiously. She was ready to grab at any straw to get a clue to her father's whereabouts!

[688] "Hello, Miss Skade," the taximan said. "How are you today?"

[689] "Oh, I'm all right," the nurse responded. "Listen, Harry. You told this young lady that you didn't carry any passenger yesterday that looked like her father. Now I saw one get into your cab. What about it?"

[690] Harry hung his head. "Listen, miss," he said to Nancy, "I got three kids and I don't want nothin' to happen to 'em. See?"

[691] "What do you mean?" Nancy asked, puzzled.

[692] When the man did not reply, Miss Skade said, "Now look, Harry. This girl's afraid that her father has been kidnapped. It's up to you to tell her all you know."

[693] "Kidnapped!" the taximan shouted. "Oh, goodnight! Now I don't know what to do."

[694] Nancy had a sudden thought. "Has somebody been threatening you, Harry?" she asked.

The cab driver's eyes nearly popped from his head. "Well," he said, "since you've guessed it, I'd better tell you everything I know."

[695] He went on to say that he had taken a passenger who fitted Mr. Drew's description toward Twin Elms where he had said he wanted to go. "Just as we were leaving the station, two other men came up and jumped into my cab. They said they were going a little farther than that and would I take them? Well, about halfway to Twin Elms, one of those men ordered me to pull up to the side of the road and stop. He told me the stranger had blacked out. He and his buddy jumped out of the car and laid the man on the grass."

[696] "How ill was he?" Nancy asked.

[697] "I don't know. He was unconscious. Just then another car came along behind us and stopped. The driver got out and offered to take your father to a hospital. The two men said okay."

[698] Nancy took heart. Maybe her father was in a hospital and had not been abducted at all But a moment later her hopes were again dashed when Harry said:

[699] "I told those guys I'd be glad to drive the sick man to a hospital, but one of them turned on me, shook his fist, and yelled, 'You just forget everything that's happened or it'll be too bad for you and your kids!'"

[700] "Oh!" Nancy cried out. and for a second everything seemed to swim before her eyes. She clutched the door handle of the taxi for support.

[701] There was no question now but that her father had been drugged, then kidnapped!

[702] CHAPTER XII. The Newspaper Clue.

[703] Miss SKADE grabbed Nancy. "Do you feel ill?" the nurse asked quickly.

[704] "Oh, I'll be all right," Nancy replied. "This news has been a great shock to me."

[705] "Is there any way I can help you?" the woman questioned. "I'd be very happy to."

[706] "Thank you, but I guess not," the young sleuth said. Smiling ruefully, she added, "But I must get busy and do something about this."

[707] The nurse suggested that perhaps Mr. Drew was in one of the local hospitals. She gave Nancy the names of the three in town.

[708] "I'll get in touch with them at once," the young detective said. "You've been most kind. And here comes your train, Miss Skade. Good-by and again thanks a million for your help!"

[709] Harry climbed out of his taxi and went to stand at the platform to signal passengers for his cab. Nancy hurried after him, and before the train came in, asked if he would please give her a description of the two men who had been with her father.

[710] "Well, both of them were dark and kind of athletic-looking. Not what I'd call handsome. One of 'em had an upper tooth missing. And the other fellow—his left ear was kind of crinkled, if you know what I mean."

[711] "I understand," said Nancy. "I'll give a description of the two men to the police."

[712] She went back to the telephone booth and called each of the three hospitals, asking if anyone by the name of Carson Drew had been admitted or possibly a patient who was not conscious and had no identification. Only Mercy Hospital had a patient who had been unconscious since the day before. He definitely was not Mr. Drew—he was Chinese!

[713] Sure now that her father was being held in some secret hiding place, Nancy went at once to police headquarters and related the taximan's story.

[714] Captain Rossland looked extremely concerned. "This is alarming, Miss Drew," he said, "but I feel sure we can trace that fellow with the crinkly ear and we'll make him tell us where your father is I doubt, though, that there is anything you can do. You'd better leave it to the police."

[715] Nancy said nothing. She was reluctant to give up even trying to do something, but she acquiesced.

[716] "In the meantime," said the officer, "I'd advise you to remain at Twin Elms and concentrate on solving the mystery there. From what you tell me about your father, I'm sure he'll be able to get out of the difficulty himself, even before the police find him."

[717] Aloud, Nancy promised to stay on call in case Captain Rossland might need her. But in her own mind the young sleuth determined that if she got any kind of a lead concerning her father, she was most certainly going to follow it up.

[718] Nancy left police headquarters and strolled up the street, deep in thought. "Instead of things getting better, all my problems seem to be getting worse. Maybe I'd better call Hannah."

[719] Since she had been a little girl, Nancy had found solace in talking to Hannah Gruen. The housekeeper had always been able to give her such good advice!

[720] Nancy went into a drugstore and entered one of the telephone booths. She called the Drew home in River Heights and was pleased when Mrs. Gruen answered. The housekeeper was aghast to learn Nancy's news but said she thought Captain Rossland's advice was sound.

[721] "You've given the police the best leads in the world and I believe that's all you can do. But wait—" the housekeeper suddenly said. "If I were you, Nancy, I'd call up those railroad lawyers and tell them exactly what has happened. Your father's disappearance is directly concerned with that bridge project, I'm sure, and the lawyers may have some ideas about where to find him."

[722] "That's a wonderful suggestion, Hannah," said Nancy. "I'll call them right away."

[723] But when the young detective phoned the railroad lawyers, she was disappointed to learn that all the men were out to lunch and none of them would return before two o'clock.

[724] "Oh dear!" Nancy sighed. "Well, I guess I'd better get a snack while waiting for them to come back." But in her worried state she did not feel like eating.

[725] There was a food counter at the rear of the drugstore and Nancy made her way to it. Perching on a high-backed stool, she read the menu over and over. Nothing appealed to her. When the counterman asked her what she wanted, Nancy said frankly she did not know—she was not very hungry-

[726] "Then I recommend our split-pea soup," he told her.   "It's homemade and out of this world." Nancy smiled at him. "I'll take your advice and try it."

[727] The hot soup was delicious. By the time she had finished it, Nancy's spirits had risen considerably.

[728] "And how about some custard pie?" the counterman inquired. "It's just like Mother used to make."

"All right," Nancy answered, smiling at the solicitous young man. The pie was ice cold and proved to be delicious. When Nancy finished eating it, she glanced at her wrist watch. It was only one-thirty. Seeing a rack of magazines, she decided to while away the time reading in her car.

[729] She purchased a magazine of detective stories, one of which proved to be so intriguing that the half hour went by quickly. Promptly at two o'clock Nancy returned to the phone booth and called the offices of the railroad lawyers. The switchboard operator connected her with Mr. Anthony Barradale and Nancy judged from his voice that he was fairly young. Quickly she told her story.

[730] "Mr. Drew being held a prisoner!" Mr. Barradale cried out. "Well, those underhanded property owners are certainly going to great lengths to gain a few dollars."

[731] "The police are working on the case, but I thought perhaps your firm would like to take a hand also," Nancy told the lawyer.

[732] "We certainly will," the young man replied. "I'll speak to our senior partner about it. I know he will want to start work at once on the case."

[733] "Thank you," said Nancy. She gave the address and telephone number of Twin Elms and asked that the lawyers get in touch with her there if any news should break.

[734] "We'll do that," Mr. Barradale promised.

[735] Nancy left the drugstore and walked back to her car. Climbing in, she wondered what her next move ought to be.

[736] "One thing is sure," she thought. "Work is the best antidote for worry. I'll get back to Twin Elms and do some more sleuthing there."

[737] As she drove along, Nancy reflected about the ghost entering Twin Elms mansion by a subterranean passage. Since she had found no sign of one in any of the outbuildings on the estate, it occurred to her that possibly it led from an obscure cave, either natural or man-made. Such a device would be a clever artifice for an architect to use.

Taking a little-used road that ran along one side of the estate, Nancy recalled having seen a long, grassed-over hillock which she had assumed to be an old aqueduct. Perhaps this was actually the hidden entrance to Twin Elms!

She parked her car at the side of the road and took a flashlight from the glove compartment. In anticipation of finding the answer to the riddle, Nancy crossed the field, and as she came closer to the beginning of the huge mound, she could see stones piled up. Getting nearer, she realized that it was indeed the entrance to a rocky cave.

[738] "Well, maybe this time I've found it!" she thought, hurrying forward.

[739] The wind was blowing strongly and tossed her hair about her face. Suddenly a freakish gust swept a newspaper from among the rocks and scattered the pages helter-skelter.

Nancy was more excited than ever. The newspaper meant a human being had been there not too long ago! The front page sailed toward her. As she grabbed it up, she saw to her complete astonishment that the paper was a copy of the River Heights Gazette. The date was the Tuesday before.

[740] "Someone interested in River Heights has been here very recently!" the young sleuth said to herself excitedly.

Who was the person? Her father? Comber? Who?

Wondering if the paper might contain any clue, Nancy dashed around to pick up all the sheets. As she spread them out on the ground, she noticed a hole in the page where classified ads appeared.

[741] "This may be a very good clue!" Nancy thought. "As soon as I get back to the house, I'll call Hannah and have her look up Tuesday's paper to see what was in that ad."

[742] It suddenly occurred to Nancy that the person who had brought the paper to the cave might be inside at this very moment. She must watch her step; he might prove to be an enemy!

"This may be where Dad is being held a prisoner!" Nancy thought wildly.

[743] Flashlight in hand, and her eyes darting intently about, Nancy proceeded cautiously into the cave. Five feet, ten. She saw no one. Fifteen more. Twenty. Then Nancy met a dead end. The empty cave was almost completely round and had no other opening,

[744] "Oh dear, another failure," Nancy told herself disappointedly, as she retraced her steps. "My only hope now is to learn something important from the ad in the paper."

[745] Nancy walked back across the field. Her eyes were down, as she automatically looked for footprints. But presently she looked up and stared in disbelief.

[746] A man was standing alongside her car, examining it. His back was half turned toward Nancy, so she could not see his face very well. But he had an athletic build and his left ear was definitely crinkly!

[747] CHAPTER XIII. The Cash.

[748] THE STRANGER inspecting Nancy's car must have heard her coming. Without turning around, he dodged back of the automobile and started off across the field in the opposite direction.

[749] "He certainly acts suspiciously. He must be the man with the crinkly ear who helped abduct my father!" Nancy thought excitedly.

[750] Quickly she crossed the road and ran after him as fast as she could, hoping to overtake him. But the man had had a good head start. Also, his stride was longer than Nancy's and he could cover more ground in the same amount of time.

The far corner of the irregular-shaped field ended at the road on which Riverview Manor stood. When Nancy reached the highway, she was just in time to see the stranger leap into a parked car and drive off.

[751] The young detective was exasperated.  She had had only a glimpse of the man's profile. If only she could have seen him full face or caught the license number of his car!

[752] "I wonder if he's the one who dropped the newspaper?" she asked herself. "Maybe he's from River Heights!" She surmised that the man himself was not one of the property owners but he might have been hired by Willie Wharton or one of the owners to help abduct Mr. Drew.

[753] "I'd better hurry to a phone and report this," Nancy thought.

[754] She ran all the way back across the field, stepped into her own car, turned it around, and headed for Twin Elms. When Nancy arrived, she sped to the telephone in the hall and dialed Cliffwood Police Headquarters. In a moment she was talking to the captain and gave him her latest information.

[755] "It certainly looks as if you picked up a good clue, Miss Drew," the officer remarked. "I'll send out an alarm immediately to have this man picked up."

[756] "I suppose there is no news of my father," Nancy said.

[757]   "I'm afraid not. But a couple of our men talked to the taxi driver Harry and he gave us a pretty good description of the man who came along the road while your father was lying unconscious on the grass—the one who offered to take him to the hospital."

[758]     "What did he look, like?" Nancy asked.

[759] The officer described the man as being in his early fifties, short, and rather heavy-set. He had shifty pale-blue eyes.

[760] "Well," Nancy replied, "I can think of several men who would fit that description. Did he have any outstanding characteristics?"

[761] "Harry didn't notice anything, except that the fellow's hands didn't look as if he did any kind of physical work. The taximan said they were kind of soft and pudgy."

[762] "Well, that eliminates all the men I know who are short, heavy-set and have pale-blue eyes. None of them has hands like that."

[763] "It'll be a great identifying feature," the police officer remarked. "Well, I guess I'd better get that alarm out."

[764] Nancy said good-by and put down the phone. She waited several seconds for the line to clear, then picked up the instrument again and called Hannah Gruen. Before Nancy lay the sheet of newspaper from which the advertisement had been torn.

[765] "The Drew residence," said a voice on the phone.

[766] "Hello, Hannah.   This is Nancy."

[767] "How are you, dear? Any news?" Mrs. Gruen asked quickly.

[768] "I haven't found Dad yet," the young detective replied. "And the police haven't either. But I've picked up a couple of clues."

[769] "Tell me about them," the housekeeper requested excitedly.

Nancy told her about the man with the crinkly ear and said she was sure that the police would soon capture him. "If he'll only talk, we may find out where Dad is being held."

[770] "Oh, I hope so!" Hannah sighed. "Don't get discouraged, Nancy."

[771] At this point Helen came into the hall, and as she passed Nancy on her way to the stairs, smiled at her friend. The young sleuth was about to ask Hannah to get the Drews' Tuesday copy of the River Heights Gazette when she heard a cracking noise overhead. Immediately she decided the ghost might be at work again.

[772] "Hannah, I'll call you back later," Nancy said and put down the phone.

[773] She had no sooner done this than Helen screamed, "Nancy, run! The ceiling!" She herself started for the front door.

[774] Nancy, looking up, saw a tremendous crack in the ceiling just above the girls' heads. The next instant the whole ceiling crashed down on them! They were thrown to the floor.

[775] "Oh!" Helen moaned. She was covered with lath and plaster, and had been hit hard on the head. But she managed to call out from under the debris, "Nancy, are you all right?" There was no answer.

[776] The tremendous noise had brought Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary on a run from the kitchen. They stared in horror at the scene before them. Nancy lay unconscious and Helen seemed too dazed to move.

[777] "Oh my!  Oh my!" Miss Flora exclaimed.

[778] She and Aunt Rosemary began stepping over the lath and plaster, which by now had filled the air with dust. They sneezed again and again but made their way forward nevertheless.

[779] Miss Flora, reaching Helen's side, started pulling aside chunks of broken plaster and lath. Finally, she helped her great-granddaughter to her feet.

[780] "Oh, my dear, you're hurt!" she said solicitously.

[781] "I'll—be—all right—in a minute," Helen insisted, choking with the dust. "But Nancy—"

[782] Aunt Rosemary had already reached the unconscious girl. With lightning speed, she threw aside the debris which almost covered Nancy. Whipping a handkerchief from her pocket, she gently laid it over Nancy's face, so that she would not breathe in any more of the dust.

[783] "Helen, do you feel strong enough to help me carry Nancy into the library?" she asked. "I'd like to lay her on the couch there."

[784] "Oh, yes, Aunt Rosemary. Do you think Nancy is badly hurt?" she asked worriedly.

[785] "I hope not."

[786] At this moment Nancy stirred.  Then her arm moved upward and she pulled the handkerchief from her face. She blinked several times as if unable to recall where she was.

[787] "You'll be all right, Nancy," said Aunt Rosemary kindly. "But I don't want you to breathe this dust. Please keep the handkerchief over your nose." She took it from Nancy's hand and once more laid it across the girl's nostrils and mouth.

[788] In a moment Nancy smiled wanly. "I remember now. The ceiling fell down."

[789] "Yes," said Helen. "It knocked you out for a few moments. I hope you're not hurt."

[790] Miss Flora, who was still sneezing violently, insisted that they all get out of the dust at once. She began stepping across the piles of debris, with Helen helping her. When they reached the library door, the elderly woman went inside.

[791] Helen returned to help Nancy. But by this time her friend was standing up, leaning on Aunt Rosemary's arm. She was able to make her way across the hall to the library. Aunt Rosemary suggested calling a doctor, but Nancy said this would not be necessary.

"I'm so thankful you girls weren't seriously hurt," Miss Flora said. "What a dreadful thing this is! Do you think the ghost is responsible?"

[792] Her daughter replied at once. "No, I don't. Mother, you will recall that for some time we have had a leak in the hall whenever it rained. And the last time we had a storm, the whole ceiling was soaked. I think that weakened the plaster and it fell of its own accord."

[793] Miss Flora remarked that a new ceiling would be a heavy expense for them. "Oh dear, more troubles all the time. But I still don't want to part with my home."

[794] Nancy, whose faculties by now were completely restored, said with a hint of a smile, "Well, there's one worry you might not have any more, Miss Flora."

[795] "What's that?"

[796] "Mr. Gomber," said Nancy, "may not be so interested in buying this property when he sees what happened."

[797] "Oh, I don't know," Aunt Rosemary spoke up. "He's pretty persistent."

[798] Nancy said she felt all right now and suggested that she and Helen start cleaning up the hall.

[799] Miss Flora would not hear of this. "Rosemary and I are going to help," she said determinedly.

[800] Cartons were brought from the cellar and one after the other was filled with the debris. After it had all been carried outdoors, mops and dust cloths were brought into use. Within an hour all the gritty plaster dust had been removed.

[801] The weary workers had just finished their job when the telephone rang. Nancy, being closest to the instrument, answered it. Hannah Gruen was calling.

[802] "Nancy! What happened?" she asked. "I've been waiting over an hour for you to call me back. "What's the matter?"

[803] Nancy gave her all the details.

[804] "What's going to happen to you next?" the housekeeper exclaimed.

[805] The young sleuth laughed. "Something good, I hope."

[806] She asked Hannah to look for her copy of the River Heights Gazette of the Tuesday before. In a few minutes the housekeeper brought it to the phone and Nancy asked her to turn to page fourteen. "That has the classified ads," she said. "Now tell me what the ad is right in the center of the page."

[807] "Do you mean the one about used cars?"

[808] "That must be it," Nancy replied. "That's not in my paper."

[809] Hannah Gruen said it was an ad for Aken's, a used-car dealer. "He's at 24 Main Street in Hancock."

[810]     "And now turn the page and tell me what ad is on the back of it," Nancy requested.

[811] "It's a story about a school picnic," Hannah told her. "Does either one of them help you?"

[812] "Yes, Hannah, I believe you've given me just the information I wanted. This may prove to be valuable. Thanks a lot."

[813] After Nancy had finished the call, she started to dial police headquarters, then changed her mind. The ghost might be hiding somewhere in the house to listen—or if he had installed microphones at various points, any conversations could be picked up and recorded on a machine a distance away.

[814] "It would be wiser for me to discuss the whole matter in person with the police, I'm sure," Nancy decided.

[815] Divulging her destination only to Helen, she told the others she was going to drive downtown but would not be gone long.

[816] "You're sure you feel able?" Aunt Rosemary asked her.

[817] "I'm perfectly fine," Nancy insisted.

[818] She set off in the convertible, hopeful that through the clue of the used-car dealer, the police might be able to pick up the name of one of the suspects.

[819] "They can track him down and through the man locate my father!"

[820] CHAPTER XIV. An Urgent Message.

[821] "EXCELLENT! " Captain Rossland said after Nancy had told her story. He smiled, "The way you're building up clues, if you were on my force, I'd recommend a citation for you!"

[822] The young sleuth smiled and thanked him. “I must find my father," she said earnestly,

[823] “I'll call Captain McGinnis of the River Heights force at once," the officer told her. ''Why don't you sit down here and wait? It shouldn't take long for them to get information from, Aken's used car lot,"

[824] Nancy agreed and took a chair in a corner of the Captain's office. Presently he called to her.

"I have your answer, Miss Drew."

[825] She jumped up and went over to his desk, The officer told her that Captain McGinnis in River Heights had been most co-operative. He had sent two men at once to Aken's used-car lot. They had just returned with a report.

"Day before yesterday an athletic-looking man with a crinkly ear came there and purchased a car. He showed a driver's license stating that he was Samuel Greenman from Huntsville."

[826] Nancy was excited over the information. "Then it will be easy to pick him up, won't it?" she asked.

[827] "I'm afraid not," Captain Rossland replied. "McGinnis learned from the Huntsville police that although Greenman is supposed to live at the address he gave, he is reported to have been out of town for some time."

[828] "Then no one knows where he is?"

[829] "Not any of his neighbors."

The officer also reported that Samuel Greenman was a person of questionable character. He was wanted on a couple of robbery charges, and police in several states had been alerted to be on the lookout for him.

[830] "Well, if the man I saw at my car is Samuel Greenman, then maybe he's hiding in this area."

[831] Captain Rossland smiled. "Are you going to suggest next that he is the ghost at Twin Elms?"

[832] "Who knows?" Nancy countered.

[833] "In any case," Captain Rossland said, "your idea that he may be hiding out around here is a good one."

[834] Nancy was about to ask the officer another question when his phone rang. A moment later he said, "It's for you, Miss Drew."

[835] The girl detective picked up the receiver and said, "Hello." The caller was Helen Corning and her voice sounded frantic.

[836] "Oh, Nancy, something dreadful has happened here! You must come home at once!"

[837] "What is it?" Nancy cried out, but Helen had already put down the instrument at her end.

[838] Nancy told Captain Rossland of the urgent request and said she must leave at once.

[839] "Let me know if you need the police," the officer called after her.

[840] "Thank you, I will."

[841] Nancy drove to Twin Elms as fast as the law allowed. As she pulled up in front of the house, she was startled to see a doctor's car there. Someone had been taken ill!

[842] Helen met her friend at the front door. "Nancy," she said in a whisper, "Miss Flora may have had a heart attack!"

[843] "How terrible!" Nancy said, shocked. "Tell me all about it."

[844] "Dr. Morrison wants Miss Flora to go to the hospital right away, but she refuses. She says she won't leave here."

[845] Helen said that the physician was still upstairs attending her great-grandmother.

[846] "When did she become ill?" Nancy asked. "Did something in particular bring on the attack?”

[847] Helen nodded. "Yes. It was very frightening. Miss Flora, Aunt Rosemary, and I were in the kitchen talking about supper. They wanted to have a special dish to surprise you, because they knew you were dreadfully upset."

[848] "That was sweet of them," Nancy remarked. "Please go on, Helen."

[849] "Miss Flora became rather tired and Aunt Rosemary suggested that she go upstairs and lie down. She had just started up the stairway, when, for some unknown reason, she turned to look back. There, in the parlor, stood a man!"

[850] "A caller?" Nancy questioned.

[851] "Oh, no!" Helen replied. "Miss Flora said he was an ugly, horrible-looking person. He was unshaven and his hair was kind of long."

[852] "Do you think he was the ghost?" Nancy inquired.

[853] "Miss Flora thought so. Well, she didn't scream. You know, she's really terribly brave. She just decided to go down and meet him herself. And then, what do you think?"

"I could guess any number of things," Nancy replied. "What did happen?"

[854] Helen said that when Mrs. Turnbull had reached the parlor, no one was in it! "And there was no secret door open."

[855] "What did Miss Flora do then?" Nancy asked.

[856] "She fainted."

[857] At this moment a tall, slender, gray-haired man, carrying a physician's bag, walked down the stairs to the front hall. Helen introduced Nancy to him, then asked about the patient.

[858] "Well, fortunately, Miss Flora is going to be all right," said Dr. Morrison. "She is an amazing woman. With complete rest and nothing more to worry her, I believe she will be all right. In fact, she may be able to be up for short periods by this time tomorrow."

[859] "Oh, I'm so relieved," said Helen. "I'm terribly fond of my great-grandmother and I don't want anything to happen to her."

[860] The physician smiled. "I'll do all I can, but you people will have to help."

[861] "How can we do that?" Nancy asked quickly.

[862] The physician said that no one was to talk about the ghost. "Miss Flora says that she saw a man in the parlor and that he must have come in by some secret entrance. Now you know, as well as I do, that such a thing is not plausible."

[863] "But the man couldn't have entered this house any other way," Helen told him quickly. "Every window and door on this first floor is kept locked."

[864] The doctor raised his eyebrows. "You've heard of hallucinations?" he asked.

[865] Nancy and Helen frowned, but remained silent.

They were sure that Miss Flora had not had an hallucination. If she had said there was a man in the parlor, then one had been there!

[866] "Call me if you need me before tomorrow morning," the doctor said as he moved toward the front door. "Otherwise I'll drop in some time before twelve."

[867] After the medic had left, the two girls exchanged glances. Nancy said, "Are you game to search the parlor again?"

[868] "You bet I am," Helen responded. "Shall we start now or wait until after supper?"

[869] Although Nancy was eager to begin at once, she thought that first she should go upstairs and extend her sympathy to Miss Flora. She also felt that a delay in serving her supper while the search went on might upset the ill woman. Helen offered to go into the kitchen at once and start preparing the meal. Nancy nodded and went up the steps.

[870] Miss Flora had been put to bed in her daughter's room to avoid any further scares from die ghost, who seemed to operate in the elderly woman's own room.

[871] "Miss Flora, I'm so sorry you have to stay in bed," said Nancy, walking up and smiling at the patient.

[872] "Well, I am too," Mrs. Turnbull replied. "And I think it's a lot of nonsense. Everybody faints once in a while. If you'd ever seen what I did—that horrible face!"

[873] "Mother!" pleaded Aunt Rosemary, who was seated in a chair on the other side of the bed. "You know what the doctor said."

[874] "Oh, these doctors!" her mother said pettishly. "Anyway, Nancy, I'm sure I saw the ghost. Now you just look for a man who hasn't shaved in goodness knows how long and has an ugly face and kind of longish hair."

[875] It was on the tip of Nancy's tongue to ask for information on the man's height and size, but recalling the doctor's warning, she said nothing about this. Instead, she smiled and taking one of Miss Flora's hands in her own, said:

[876] "Let's not talk any more about this until you're up and well. Then I'll put you on the Drew and Company detective squad!"

[877] The amusing remark made the elderly woman smile and she promised to try getting some rest.

[878] "But first I want something to eat," she demanded. "Do you think you girls can manage alone? I'd like Rosemary to stay here with me."

[879] "Of course we can manage, and we'll bring you exactly what you should have to eat."

[880] Nancy went downstairs and set up a tray for Miss Flora. On it was a cup of steaming chicken bouillon, a thin slice of well-toasted bread, and a saucer of plain gelatin.

[881] A few minutes later Helen took another tray upstairs with a more substantial meal on it for Aunt Rosemary. Then the two girls sat down in the dining room to have their own supper. After finishing it, they quickly washed and dried all the dishes, then started for the parlor.

[882] "Where do you think we should look?" Helen whispered.

[883] During the past half hour Nancy had been going over in her mind what spot in the parlor they might have overlooked—one which could possibly have an opening behind it. She had decided on a large cabinet built into the wall. It contained a beautiful collection of figurines, souvenirs from many places, and knickknacks of various kinds.

[884] "I'm going to look for a hidden spring that may move the cabinet away from the wall," Nancy told Helen in a low voice.

[885] For the first time she noticed that each of the figurines and knickknacks were set in small depressions on the shelves. Nancy wondered excitedly if this had been done so that the figurines would not fall over in case the cabinet were moved.

[886] Eagerly she began to look on the back wall of the interior of the cabinet for a spring. She and Helen together searched every inch of the upper part but found no spring to move the great built-in piece of furniture.

[887] On the lower part of the cabinet were two doors which Nancy had already opened many times. But then she had been looking for a large opening.

Now she was hoping to locate a tiny spring or movable panel.

[888] Helen searched the left side, while Nancy took the right. Suddenly her pulse quickened in anticipation. She had felt a spot slightly higher than the rest.

Nancy ran her fingers back and forth across the area which was about half an inch high and three inches long.

[889] "It may conceal something," she thought, and pushed gently against the wood.

[890] Nancy felt a vibration in the whole cabinet

[891] "Helen! I've found something!" she whispered hoarsely. "Better stand back!"

[892] Nancy pressed harder. This time the right side of the cabinet began to move forward. Nancy jumped up from her knees and stood back with Helen. Slowly, very slowly, one end of the cabinet began to move into the parlor, the other into an open space behind it.

[893] Helen grabbed Nancy's hand in fright. What were they going to find in the secret passageway?

[894] CHAPTER XV. A New Suspect.

[895] THE GREAT crystal chandelier illuminated the narrow passageway behind the cabinet. It was not very long. No one was in it and the place was dusty and filled with cobwebs.

[896] "There's probably an exit at the other end of this," said Nancy. "Let's see where it goes."

[897] "I think I'd better wait here, Nancy," Helen suggested. "This old cabinet might suddenly start to close itself. If it does, I'll yell so you can get out in time."

[898] Nancy laughed. "You're a real pal, Helen."

[899] As Nancy walked along the passageway, she looked carefully at the two walls which lined it. There was no visible exit from either of the solid, plastered walls. The far end, too, was solid, but this wall had been built of wood.

[900] Nancy felt it might have some significance. At the moment she could not figure it out and started to return to the parlor. Halfway along the narrow corridor, she saw a folded piece of paper lying on the floor.

[901] "This may prove something," she told herself eagerly, picking it up.

[902] Just as Nancy stepped back into the parlor, Aunt Rosemary appeared. She stared in astonishment at the opening in the wall and at the cabinet which now stood at right angles to it.

[903] "You found something?" she asked.

[904] "Only this," Nancy replied, and handed Aunt Rosemary the folded paper.

[905] As the girls looked over her shoulder, Mrs. Hayes opened it. "This is an unfinished letter," she commented, then started to decipher the old-fashioned handwriting. "Why, this was written way back in 1785—not long after the house was built."

[906] The note read:

[907] My honorable friend Benjamin:

[908] The disloyalty of two of my servants has first come to my attention. I am afraid they plan to harm the cause of the Colonies. I will have them properly punished. My good fortune in learning about this disloyalty came while I was at my listening post. Every word spoken in the servants' sitting room can be overheard by me.

[909] I will watch for further—

[910] The letter ended at this point Instantly Helen said, "Listening post?"

[911] "It must be at the end of this passageway," Nancy guessed. "Aunt Rosemary, what room would connect with it?"

[912] "I presume the kitchen," Mrs. Hayes replied. "And it seems to me that I once heard that the present kitchen was a sitting room for the servants long ago. You recall that back in Colonial days food was never cooked in a mansion. It was always prepared in another building and brought in on great trays."

[913] Helen smiled. "With a listening post the poor servants here didn't have a chance for a good chitchat together. Their conversations were never a secret from their master!"

[914] Nancy and Aunt Rosemary smiled too and nodded, then the young sleuth said, "Let's see if this listening post still works."

[915] It was arranged that Helen would go into the kitchen and start talking. Nancy would stand at the end of the corridor to listen. Aunt Rosemary, who was shown how to work the hidden spring on the cabinet, would act as guard if the great piece of furniture suddenly started to move and close the opening.

[916] "All ready?" Helen asked. She moved out of the room.

[917] When she thought Nancy was at her post, she began to talk about her forthcoming wedding and asked Nancy to be in the bridal party.

[918] "I can hear Helen very plainly!" Nancy called excitedly to Aunt Rosemary. "The listening post is as good as ever!"

[919] When the test was over, and the cabinet manually closed by Nancy, she and Helen and Aunt Rosemary held a whispered conversation. They all decided that the ghost knew about the passageway and had overheard plans which those in the house were making. Probably this was where the ghost disappeared after Miss Flora spotted him.

[920] "Funny that we seem to do more planning while we're in the kitchen than in any other room," Aunt Rosemary remarked.

[921] Helen said she wondered if this listening post was unique with the owner and architect of Twin Elms mansion.

[922] "No, indeed," Aunt Rosemary told her. "Many old homes where there were servants had such places. Don't forget that our country has been involved in several wars, during which traitors and spies found it easy to get information while posing as servants."

[923] "Very clever," Helen remarked. "And I suppose a lot of the people who were caught never knew how they had been found out."

[924] "No doubt," said Aunt Rosemary.

[925] At that moment they heard Miss Flora's feeble voice calling from the bedroom and hurried up the steps to be sure that she was all right. They found her smiling, but she complained that she did not like to stay alone so long.

[926] "I won't leave you again tonight, Mother," Aunt Rosemary promised. "I'm going to sleep on the couch in this room so as not to disturb you. Now try to get a little sleep."

[927] The following morning Nancy had a phone call from Hannah Gruen, whose voice sounded very irate. "I've just heard from Mr. Barradale, the railroad lawyer, Nancy. He lost your address and phone number, so he called here. I'm furious at what he had to say. He hinted that your father might be staying away on purpose because he wasn't able to produce Willie Wharton!"

[928] Nancy was angry too. "Why, that's absolutely unfair and untrue," she cried.

[929] "Well, I just wouldn't stand for it if I were you," Hannah Gruen stated flatly. "And that's only half of it."

[930] "You mean he had more to say about Dad?" Nancy questioned quickly.

[931] "No, not that," the housekeeper answered. "He was calling to say that the railroad can't hold up the bridge project any longer. If some new evidence isn't produced by Monday, the railroad will be forced to accede to the demands of Willie Wharton and all those other property owners!"

[932] "Oh, that would be a great blow to Dad!" said Nancy. "He wouldn't want this to happen. He's sure that the signature on that contract of sale is Willie Wharton's. All he has to do is find him and prove it."

[933] "Everything is such a mess," said Mrs. Gruen. "I was talking to the police just before I called you and they have no leads at all to where your father might be."

[934] "Hannah, this is dreadful" said Nancy. "I don't know how, but I intend to find Dad—and quickly, too!"

[935] After the conversation between herself and the housekeeper was over, Nancy walked up and down the hall, as she tried to formulate a plan. Something must be done!

[936] Suddenly Nancy went to the front door, opened it, and walked outside. She breathed deeply of the lovely morning air and headed for the rose garden. She let the full beauty of the estate sink into her consciousness, before permitting herself to think further about the knotty problem before her.

[937] Long ago Mr. Drew had taught Nancy that the best way to clear one's brain is to commune with Nature for a time. Nancy went up one walk and down another, listening to the twittering of the birds and now and then the song of the meadow lark. Again she smelled deeply of the roses and the sweet wisteria which hung over a sagging arbor.

[938] Ten minutes later she returned to the house and sat down on the porch steps. Almost at once a mental image of Nathan Comber came to her as dearly as if the man had been standing in front of her. The young sleuth's mind began to put together the various pieces of the puzzle regarding him and the railroad property.

[939] "Maybe Nathan Comber is keeping Willie Wharton away!" she said to herself. "Willie may even be a prisoner! And if Comber is that kind of a person, maybe he engineered the abduction of my father!"

[940] The very thought frightened Nancy. Leaping up, she decided to ask the police to have Nathan Comber shadowed.

[941] "I'll go down to headquarters and talk to Captain Rossland," she decided. "And I'll ask Helen to go along. The cleaning woman is here, so she can help Aunt Rosemary in case of an emergency."

[942] Without explaining her real purpose in wanting to go downtown, Nancy merely asked Helen to accompany her there for some necessary marketing. The two girls drove off, and on the way to town Nancy gave Helen full details of her latest theories about Nathan Comber.

[943] Helen was amazed. "And here he was acting so worried about your father's safety!"

[944] When the girls reached police headquarters, they had to wait a few minutes to see Captain Rossland. Nancy fidgeted under the delay. Every moment seemed doubly precious now. But finally the girls were ushered inside and the officer greeted them warmly.

[945] "Another clue, Miss Drew?" he asked with a smile.

[946] Nancy told her story quickly.

[947] "I think you're on the right track," the officer stated. "I'll be very glad to get in touch with your Captain McGinnis in River Heights and relay your message. And I'll notify all the men on my force to be on the lookout for this Nathan Comber."

[948] "Thank you," said Nancy gratefully. "Every hour that goes by I become more and more worried about my father."

[949] "A break should come soon," the officer told her kindly. "The minute I hear anything I'll let you know."

[950] Nancy thanked him and the girls went on their way. It took every bit of Nancy's stamina not to show her inmost feelings. She rolled the cart through the supermarket almost automatically, picking out needed food items. Her mind would say, "We need more canned peas because the ghost took what we had," and at the meat counter she reflected, "Dad loves thick, juicy steaks."

[951] Finally the marketing was finished and the packages stowed in the rear of the convertible. On the way home, Helen asked Nancy what plans she had for pursuing the mystery.

[952] "To tell the truth, I've been thinking about it continuously, but so far I haven't come up with any new ideas," Nancy answered. "I'm sure, though, that something will pop up."

[953] When the girls were a little distance from the entrance to the Twin Elms estate, they saw a car suddenly pull out of the driveway and make a right turn. The driver leaned out his window and looked back. He wore a smug grin.

[954] "Why, it's Nathan Gomber!" Nancy cried out.

[955] "And did you see that smirk on his face?" Helen asked. "Oh, Nancy, maybe that means he's finally persuaded Miss Flora to sell the property to him!"

[956] "Yes," Nancy replied grimly. "And also, here I've just asked the police to shadow him and I'm the first person to see him!"

[957] With that Nancy put on speed and shot ahead. As she passed the driveway to the estate, Helen asked, "Where are you going?"

[958] "I'm following Nathan Comber until I catch him!"

[959] CHAPTER XVI. Sold!

[960] "On, NANCY, I hope we meet a police officer!" said Helen Corning. "If Comber is a kidnaper, he may try to harm us if we do catch up to him!"

[961]  "We'll have to be cautious," Nancy admitted. "But I'm afraid we're not going to meet any policeman. I haven't seen one on these roads in all the time I've been here."

[962] Both girls watched the car ahead of them intently. It was near enough for Nancy to be able to read the license number. She wondered if the car was registered under Comber's name or someone else's. If it belonged to a friend of his, this fact might lead the police to another suspect

[963] "Where do you think Comber's going?" Helen asked presently. "To meet somebody?"

[964] "Perhaps. And he may be on his way back to River Heights."

[965] "Not yet," Helen said, for at that moment Comber had reached a crossroads and turned sharp right. "That road leads away from River Heights."

[966] "But it does lead past Riverview Manor," Nancy replied tensely as she neared the crossroads.

[967] Turning right, the girls saw Comber ahead, tearing along at a terrific speed. He passed the vacant mansion. A short distance beyond it he began to turn his car lights off and on.

[968] "What's he doing that for?" Helen queried. "Is he just testing his lights?"

[969] Nancy was not inclined to think so. "I believe he's signaling to someone. Look all around, Helen, and see if you can spot anybody." She herself was driving so fast that she did not dare take her eyes from the road.

[970] Helen gazed right and left, and then turned to gaze through the back window. "I don't see a soul," she reported.

Nancy began to feel uneasy. It was possible that Comber might have been signaling to someone to follow the girls. "Helen, keep looking out the rear window and see if a car appears and starts to follow us."

[971] "Maybe we ought to give up the chase and just tell the police about Comber," Helen said a bit fearfully.

[972] But Nancy did not want to do this. "I think it will help us a lot to know where he's heading."

She continued the pursuit and several miles farther on came to the town of Hancock.

[973] "Isn't this where that crinkly-eared fellow lives?" Helen inquired.

"Yes."

[974] "Then it's my guess Comber is going to see him."

[975] Nancy reminded her friend that the man was reported to be out of town, presumably because he was wanted by the police on a couple of robbery charges.

[976] Though Hancock was small, there was a great deal of traffic on the main street. In the center of town at an intersection, there was a signal light. Comber shot through the green, but by the time Nancy reached the spot, the light had turned red.

[977] "Oh dear!" she fumed. "Now I'll probably lose him!"

[978] In a few seconds the light changed to green and Nancy again took up her pursuit. But she felt that at this point it was futile. Comber could have turned down any of a number of side streets, or if he had gone straight through the town he would now be so far ahead of her that it was doubtful she could catch him. Nancy went on, nevertheless, for another three miles. Then, catching no sight of her quarry, she decided to give up the chase.

[979] "I guess it's hopeless, Helen," she said. "I'm going back to Hancock and report everything to the police there. I'll ask them to get in touch with Captain Rossland and Captain McGinnis."

[980] "Oh, I hope they capture Comber 1" Helen said. "He's such a horrible man! He ought to be put in jail just for his bad manners!"

[981] Smiling, Nancy turned the car and headed back for Hancock. A woman passer-by gave her directions to police headquarters and a few moments later Nancy parked in front of it. The girls went inside the building. Nancy told the officer in charge who they were, then gave him full details of the recent chase.

[982] The officer listened attentively, then said, "I'll telephone your River Heights captain first."

[983] "And please alert your own men and the State Police," Nancy requested.

[984] He nodded. "Don't worry, Miss Drew, I'll follow through from here." He picked up his phone.

[985] Helen urged Nancy to leave immediately. "While you were talking, I kept thinking about Comber's visit to Twin Elms. I have a feeling something may have happened there. You remember what a self-satisfied look Comber had on his face when we saw him come out of the driveway."

[986] "You're right," Nancy agreed. "We'd better hurry back there."

[987] It was a long drive back to Twin Elms and the closer the girls go to it, the more worried they became. "Miss Flora was already ill," Helen said tensely, "and Comber's visit may have made her worse."

[988] On reaching the house, the front door was opened by Aunt Rosemary, who looked pale.

[989] "I'm so glad you've returned," she said. "My mother is much worse. She has had a bad shock. I'm waiting for Dr. Morrison."

[990] Mrs. Hayes’ voice was trembling and she found it hard to go on. Nancy said sympathetically, "We know Nathan Comber was here. We've been chasing his car, but lost it. Did he upset Miss Flora?"

[991] "Yes. I was out of the house about twenty minutes talking with the gardener and didn't happen to see Comber drive up. The cleaning woman, Lillie, let him in. Of course she didn't know who he was and thought he was all right. When she finally came outside to tell me, I had walked way over to the wisteria arbor at the far end of the grounds.

"In the meantime, Comber went upstairs. He began talking to Mother about selling the mansion. When she refused, he threatened her, saying that if she did not sign, all kinds of dreadful things would happen to me and to both you girls.

"Poor mother couldn't hold out any longer. At this moment Lillie, who couldn't find me, returned and went upstairs. She actually witnessed Mother's signature on the contract of sale and signed her own name to it. So Comber has won!"

[992] Aunt Rosemary sank into the chair by the telephone and began to cry. Nancy and Helen put their arms around her, but before either could say a word of comfort, they heard a car drive up in front of the mansion. At once Mrs. Hayes dried her eyes and said, "It must be Dr. Morrison."

[993] Nancy opened the door and admitted the physician. The whole group went upstairs where Miss Flora lay staring at the ceiling like someone in a trance. She was murmuring:

[994] "I shouldn't have signed! I shouldn't have sold Twin Elms!"

[995] Dr. Morrison took the patient's pulse and listened to her heartbeat with a stethoscope. A few moments later he said, "Mrs. Turnbull, won't you please let me take you to the hospital?"

[996] "Not yet," said Miss Flora stubbornly. She smiled wanly. "I know I'm ill. But I'm not going to get better any quicker in the hospital than I am right here. I'll be moving out of Twin Elms soon enough and I want to stay here as long as I can. Oh, why did I ever sign my name to that paper?"

[997] As an expression of defeat came over the physician's face, Nancy moved to the bedside. "Miss Flora," she said gently, "maybe the deal will never go through. In the first place, perhaps we can prove that you signed under coercion. If that doesn't work, you know it takes a long time to have a title search made on property. By then, maybe Comber will change his mind."

[998] "Oh, I hope you're right," the elderly woman replied, squeezing Nancy's hand affectionately.

[999] The girls left the room, so that Dr. Morrison could examine the patient further and prescribe for her. They decided to say nothing of their morning's adventure to Miss Flora, but at luncheon they gave Aunt Rosemary a full account.

[1000] "I'm almost glad you didn't catch Comber." Mrs. Hayes exclaimed. "He might have harmed you both."

[1001] Nancy said she felt sure that the police of one town or the other would soon capture him, and then perhaps many things could be explained. "For one, we can find out why he was turning his lights off and on. I have a hunch he was signaling to someone and that the person was hidden in Riverview Manor!"

[1002] "You may be right," Aunt Rosemary replied.

[1003] Helen suddenly leaned across the table. "Do you suppose our ghost thief hides out there?"

[1004] "I think it's very probable," Nancy answered. "I'd like to do some sleuthing in that old mansion."

[1005] "You're not going to break in?" Helen asked, horrified.

[1006]    Her friend smiled. "No, Helen, I'm not going to evade the law. I'll go to the realtor who is handling the property and ask him to show me the place. Want to come along?"

[1007] Helen shivered a little but said she was game. "Let's do it this afternoon."

[1008] "Oh dear." Aunt Rosemary gave an anxious sigh. "I don't know whether or not I should let you. It sounds very dangerous to me."

[1009] "If the realtor is with us, we should be safe," Helen spoke up. Her aunt then gave her consent, and added that the realtor, Mr. Dodd, had an office on Main Street.

[1010] Conversation ceased for a few moments as the threesome finished luncheon. They had just left the table when they heard a loud thump upstairs.

[1011] "Oh, goodness!" Aunt Rosemary cried out. "I hope Mother hasn't fallen!"

[1012] She and the girls dashed up the stairs. Miss Flora was in bed, but she was trembling like a leaf in the wind. She pointed a thin, white hand toward the ceiling.

[1013] "It was up in the attic!  Somebody’s there!"

[1014] CHAPTER XVII. Through the Trap Door.

[1015] "LET'S find out who's in the attic!" Nancy urged as she ran from the room, Helen at her heels.

[1016] "Mother, will you be all right if I leave you a few moments?" Aunt Rosemary asked. "I'd like to go with the girls."

[1017] "Of course. Run along."

[1018] Nancy and Helen were already on their way to the third floor. They did not bother to go noiselessly, but raced up the center of the creaking stairs. Reaching the attic, they lighted two of the candles and looked around. They saw no one, and began to look behind trunks and pieces of furniture. Nobody was hiding.

[1019] "And there's no evidence," said Nancy, "that the alarming thump was caused by a falling box or carton."

[1020] "There's only one answer," Helen decided. "The ghost was here. But how did he get in?"

[1021] The words were scarcely out of her mouth when the group heard a man's spine-chilling laugh. It had not come from downstairs.

[1022] "He—he's back of the wall!" Helen gasped fearfully. Nancy agreed, but Aunt Rosemary said, "That laugh could have come from the roof."

[1023] Helen looked at her aunt questioningly. "You —you mean that the ghost swings onto the roof from a tree and climbs in here somehow?"

[1024] "I think it very likely," her aunt replied. "My father once told, my mother that there's a trap door to the roof. I never saw it and I forgot having heard of it until this minute."

[1025] Holding their candles high, the girls examined every inch of the peaked, beamed ceiling. The rafters were set close together with wood panels between them.

[1026] "I see something that might be a trap door!" Nancy called out presently from near one end of the attic. She showed the others where some short panels formed an almost perfect square.

[1027] "But how does it open?" Helen asked. "There's no knob or hook or any kind of gadget to grab hold of."

[1028] "It might have been removed, or rusted off," Nancy said.

[1029] She asked Helen to help her drag a high wooden box across the floor until it was directly under the suspected section and Nancy stepped up onto it. Focusing her light on the four edges of the panels, the young sleuth finally discovered a piece of metal wedged between two of the planks.

[1030] "I think I see a way to open this," Nancy said, "but I'll need some tools."

[1031] "I'll get the ones I found before," Helen offered.

She hurried downstairs and procured them. Nancy tried one tool after another, but none would work; they were either too wide to fit into the crack or they would not budge the piece of metal either up or down.

[1032]   Nancy looked down at Aunt Rosemary. "Do you happen to have an old-fashioned buttonhook?" she asked. "That might be just the thing for this job."

[1033] "Indeed I have—in fact, Mother has several of them. I'll get one."

[1034] Aunt Rosemary was gone only a few minutes. Upon her return, she handed Nancy a long, silver-handled buttonhook inscribed with Mrs. Turn-bull's initials. "Mother used this to fasten her high button shoes. She has a smaller matching one for glove buttons. In olden days," she told the girls, "no lady's gloves were the pull-on type. They all had buttons."

Nancy inserted the long buttonhook into the ceiling crack and almost at once was able to grasp the piece of metal and pull it down. Now she began tugging on it. When nothing happened, Helen climbed up on the box beside her friend and helped pull

[1035] Presently there was a groaning, rasping noise and the square section of the ceiling began to move downward. The girls continued to yank on the metal piece and slowly a folded ladder attached to the wood became visible.

[1036] "The trap door's up there!" Helen cried gleefully, looking at the roof. "Nancy, you shall have the honor of being the first one to look out."

[1037] Nancy smiled. "And, you mean, capture the ghost?"

[1038] As the ladder was straightened out, creaking with each pull, and set against the roof, Nancy felt sure, however, that the ghost did not use it. The ladder made entirely too much noise! She also doubted that he was on the roof, but it would do no harm to look. She might pick up a clue of some sort!

[1039] "Well, here I go," Nancy said, and started to ascend the rungs.

[1040] When she reached the top, Nancy unfastened the trap door and shoved it upward. She poked her head outdoors and looked around. No one was in sight on the roof, but in the center stood a circular wooden lookout. It occurred to Nancy that possibly the ghost might be hiding in it!

[1041] She called down to Aunt Rosemary and Helen to look up at the attic ceiling for evidence of an opening into the tower. They returned to Nancy in half a minute to report that they could find no sign of another trap door.

[1042] "There probably was one in olden days," said Aunt Rosemary, "but it was closed up."

[1043] A sudden daring idea came to the girl detective. "I'm going to crawl over to that lookout and see if anybody's in it!" she told the two below.

Before either of them could object, she started to crawl along the ridgepole above the wooden shingled sides of the deeply slanting roof. Helen had raced up the ladder, and now watched her friend fearfully.

[1044] "Be careful, Nancy!" she warned.

[1045] Nancy was doing just that. She must keep a perfect balance or tumble down to almost certain death. Halfway to the tower, the daring girl began to feel that she had been foolhardy, but she was determined to reach her goal.

"Only five more feet to go," Nancy told herself presently.

With a sigh of relief, she reached the tower and pulled herself tip. It was circular and had openings on each side. She looked in. No "ghost"!

[1046] Nancy decided to step inside the opening and examine the floor. She set one foot down, but immediately the boards, rotted from the weather, gave way beneath her.

[1047] "It's a good thing I didn't put my whole weight on it," she thought thankfully.

[1048] "Do you see anything?" Helen called.

[1049] "Not a thing. This floor hasn't been in use for a long time."

[1050] "Then the ghost didn't come in by way of the roof," Helen stated.

[1051] Nancy nodded in agreement. "The only places left to look are the chimneys," the young sleuth told her friend. "I'll check them."

[1052] There were four of these and Nancy crawled to each one in turn. She looked inside but found nothing to suggest that the ghost used any of them for entry.

[1053] Balancing herself against the last chimney. Nancy surveyed the countryside around her. What a beautiful and picturesque panorama it was, she thought! Not far away was a lazy little river, whose waters sparkled in the sunlight. The surrounding fields were green and sprinkled with patches of white daisies.

Nancy looked down on the grounds of Twin Elms and tried in her mind to reconstruct the original landscaping.

[1054] "That brick walk to the next property must have had a lovely boxwood hedge at one time," she said to herself.

[1055] Her gaze now turned to Riverview Manor. The grounds there were overgrown with weeds and several shutters were missing from the house. Suddenly Nancy's attention was drawn to one of the uncovered windowpanes. Did she see a light moving inside?

[1056] It disappeared a moment later and Nancy could not be sure. Perhaps the sun shining on the glass had created an optical illusion.

[1057] "Still, somebody just might be in that house," the young sleuth thought. "The sooner I get over there and see what I can find out, the better! If the ghost is hiding out there, maybe he uses some underground passage from one of the outbuildings on the property."

[1058] She crawled cautiously back to the trap door and together the girls closed it. Aunt Rosemary had already gone downstairs to take care of her mother.

[1059] Nancy told Helen what she thought she had just seen in the neighboring mansion. "I'll change my clothes right away. Then let's go see Mr. Dodd, the realtor broker for Riverview Manor."

[1060] A half hour later the two girls walked into the real-estate office. Mr. Dodd himself was there and Nancy asked him about looking at Riverview Manor.

[1061] "I'm sorry, miss," he said, "but the house has just been sold."

[1062] Nancy was stunned. She could see all her plans crumbling into nothingness. Then a thought came to her. Perhaps the new owner would not object if she looked around, anyway.

[1063] "Would you mind telling me, Mr. Dodd, who purchased Riverview Manor?"

[1064] "Not at all," the realtor replied. "A man named Nathan Comber."

[1065] CHAPTER XVIII. A Confession.

[1066] NANCY DREW'S face wore such a disappointed look that Mr. Dodd, the realtor, said kindly, "Don't take it so hard, miss. I don't think you'd be particularly interested in Riverview Manor. It's really not in very good condition. Besides, you'd need a pile of money to fix that place up."

[1067] Without commenting on his statement, Nancy asked, "Couldn't you possibly arrange for me to see the inside of the mansion?"

[1068] Mr. Dodd shook his head. "I'm afraid Mr. Comber wouldn't like that."

[1069] Nancy was reluctant to give up. Why, her father might even be a prisoner in that very house! "Of course I can report my suspicion to the police," the young sleuth thought.

[1070] She decided to wait until morning. Then, if there was still no news of Mr. Drew, she would pass along the word to Captain Rossland.

[1071] Mr. Dodd's telephone rang. As he answered it, Nancy and Helen started to leave his office. But he immediately waved them back.

[1072] "The call is from Chief Rossland, Miss Drew," he said. "He phoned Twin Elms and learned you were here. He wants to see you at once."

[1073] "Thank you," said Nancy, and the girls left.

They hurried to police headquarters, wondering why the officer wanted to speak to Nancy.

[1074] "Oh, if only it's news of Dad," she exclaimed fervently. "But why didn't he get in touch with me himself?"

[1075] "I don't want to be a killjoy," Helen spoke up. "But maybe it's not about your father at all. Perhaps they've caught Nathan Comber."

[1076] Nancy parked in front of headquarters and the two girls hurried inside the building. Captain Rossland was expecting them and they were immediately ushered into his office. Nancy introduced Helen Corning.

[1077] "I won't keep you in suspense," the officer said, watching Nancy's eager face. "We have arrested Samuel Greenman!"

[1078] "The crinkly-eared man?" Helen asked.

[1079] "That's right," Captain Rossland replied. "Thanks to your tip about the used car, Miss Drew, our men had no trouble at all locating him."

[1080] The officer went on to say, however, that the prisoner refused to confess that he had had anything to do with Mr. Drew's disappearance.

[1081] "Furthermore, Harry the taxi driver—we have him here—insists that he cannot positively identify Greenman as one of the passengers in his cab. We believe Harry is scared that Greenman's pals will beat him up or attack members of his family."

[1082] "Harry did tell me," Nancy put in, "that his passenger had threatened harm to his family unless he forgot all about what he had seen."

[1083] "That proves our theory," Captain Rossland stated with conviction. "Miss Drew, we think you can help the police."

[1084] "I'll be glad to. How?"

Captain Rossland smiled. "You may not know it, but you're a very persuasive young lady. 1 believe that you might be able to get information out of both Harry and Greenman, where we have failed."

[1085] After a moment's thought, Nancy replied modestly, "I'll be happy to try, but on one condition." She grinned at the officer. "I must talk to these men alone."

[1086] "Request granted." Captain Rossland smiled. He added that he and Helen would wait outside and he would have Harry brought in.

[1087] "Good luck," said Helen as she and the captain left the room.

[1088] A few moments later Harry walked in alone. "Oh hello, miss," he said to Nancy, barely raising his eyes from the floor.

[1089] "Won't you sit down, Harry," Nancy asked, indicating a chair alongside hers. "It was nice of the captain to let me talk to you."

[1090] Harry seated himself, but said nothing. He twisted his driver's tap nervously in his hands and kept his gaze downward.

[1091] "Harry," Nancy began, "I guess your children would feel terrible if you were kidnapped."

[1092] "It would cut 'em to pieces," the cabman stated emphatically.

[1093]  "Then you know how I feel," Nancy went on. "Not a word from my father for two whole days. If your children knew somebody who'd seen the person who kidnapped you, wouldn't they feel bad if the man wouldn't talk?"

[1094] Harry at last raised his eyes and looked straight at Nancy. "I get you, miss. When somethin' comes home to you, it makes all the difference in the world. You win! I can identify that scoundrel Greenman, and I will. Call the captain in."

[1095] Nancy did not wait a second. She opened the door and summoned the officer,

[1096] "Harry has something to tell you," Nancy said to Captain Rossland.

[1097] "Yeah," said Harry, "I'm not goin' to hold out any longer, I admit Greenman had me scared, but he's the guy who rode in my cab, then ordered me to keep my mouth shut after that other passenger blacked out."

[1098] Captain Rossland looked astounded. It was evident he could hardly believe that Nancy in only a few minutes had persuaded the man to talk!

[1099] "And now," Nancy asked, "may I talk to your prisoner?"

[1100] "I'll have you taken to his cell," the captain responded, and rang for a guard.

[1101] Nancy was led down a corridor, past a row of cells until they came to one where the man with the crinkled ear sat on a cot.

[1102] "Greenman," said the guard, "step up here. This is Miss Nancy Drew, daughter of the kidnapped man. She wants to talk to you."

[1103] The prisoner shuffled forward, but mumbled, "I ain't goin' to answer no questions."

Nancy waited until the guard had moved off, then she smiled at the prisoner. "We all make mistakes at times," she said. "We're often misled by people who urge us to do things we shouldn't. Maybe you're afraid you'll receive the death sentence for helping to kidnap my father. But if you didn't realize the seriousness of the whole thing, the complaint against you may turn out just to be conspiracy."

[1104] To Nancy's astonishment, Greenman suddenly burst out, "You've got me exactly right, miss. I had almost nothing to do with takin' your father away. The guy I was with—he's the old-timer. He's got a long prison record. I haven't. Honest, miss, this is my first offense.

"I'll tell you the whole story. I met this guy only Monday night. He sure sold me a bill of goods. But all I did was see that your pop didn't run away. The old-timer's the one that drugged him."

[1105] "Where is my father now?" Nancy interrupted.

[1106] "I don't know. Honest I don't," Greenman insisted. "Part of the plan was for somebody to follow the taxi. After a while Mr. Drew was to be given a whiff of somethin'. It didn't have no smell. That's why our taxi driver didn't catch on. And it didn't knock the rest of us out, 'cause you have to put the stuff right under a fellow's nose to make it work."

[1107] "And the person who was following in a car and took my father away, who is he?"

[1108] "I don't know," the prisoner answered, and Nancy felt that he was telling the truth.

[1109] "Did you get any money for doing this?" Nancy asked him.

[1110] "A little. Not as much as it was worth, especially if I have to go to prison. The guy who paid us for our work was the one in the car who took your father away."

[1111] "Will you describe him?" Nancy requested.

[1112] "Sure. Hope the police catch him soon. He's in his early fifties—short and heavy-set, pale, and has kind of watery blue eyes."

[1113] Nancy asked the prisoner if he would dictate the same confession for the police and the man nodded. "And I'm awful sorry I caused all this worry, miss. I hope you find your father soon and I wish I could help you more. I guess I am a coward. I'm too scared to tell the name of the guy who talked me into this whole thing. He's really a bad actor—no tellin’ what'd happen to me if I gave his name."

[1114] The young sleuth felt that she had obtained all the information she possibly could from the man. She went back to Captain Rossland, who for the second time was amazed by the girl's success. He called a stenographer. Then he said good-by to Nancy and Helen and went off toward Greenman's cell.

[1115] On the way back to Twin Elms, Helen congratulated her friend. "Now that one of the kidnapers has been caught, I'm sure that your father will be found soon, Nancy. Who do you suppose the man was who took your father from Greenman and his friend?"

[1116] Nancy looked puzzled, then answered, "We know from his description that he wasn't Gomber. But, Helen, a hunch of mine is growing stronger all the time that he's back of this whole thing. And putting two and two together, I believe it was Willie Wharton who drove that car.

"And I also believe Wharton's the one who's been playing ghost, using masks at times—like the gorilla and the unshaven, long-haired man.

"Somehow he gets into the mansion and listens to conversations. He heard that I was going to be asked to solve the mystery at Twin Elms and told Comber. That's why Gomber came to our home and tried to keep me from coming here by saying I should stick close to Dad."

[1117] "That's right," said Helen. "And when he found that didn't work, he had Willie and Greenman and that other man kidnap your dad. He figured it would surely get you away from Twin Elms. He wanted to scare Miss Flora into selling the property, and he thought if you were around you might dissuade her."

[1118] "But in that I didn't succeed," said Nancy a bit forlornly. "Besides, they knew Dad could stop those greedy land owners from forcing the railroad to pay them more for their property. That's why I'm sure Gomber and Wharton won't release him until after they get what they want."

[1119] Helen laid a hand on Nancy's shoulder. "I'm so terribly sorry about this. What can we do next?"

[1120] "Somehow I have a feeling, Helen," her friend replied, "that you and I are going to find Willie Wharton before very long. And if we do, and I find out he really signed that contract of sale, I want certain people to be around."

[1121] "Who?" Helen asked, puzzled.

[1122] "Mr. Barradale, the lawyer, and Mr. Watson the notary public."

[1123] The young sleuth put her thought into action. Knowing that Monday was the deadline set by the railroad, she determined to do her utmost before that time to solve the complicated mystery. Back at Twin Elms, Nancy went to the telephone and put in a call to Mr. Barradale's office. She did not dare mention Comber's or Willie Wharton's name for fear one or the other of them might be listening. She merely asked the young lawyer if he could possibly come to Cliffwood and bring with him whatever he felt was necessary for him to win his case.

[1124] "I think I understand what you really mean to say," he replied. "I take it you can't talk freely. Is that correct?"

"Yes."

[1125] "Then I'll ask the questions. You want me to come to the address that you gave us the other day?"

"Yes. About noon."

[1126] "And you'd like me to bring along the contract of sale with Willie Wharton's signature?"

[1127] "Yes. That will be fine." Nancy thanked him and hung up.

[1128] Turning from the telephone, she went to find Helen and said, "There's still lots of daylight. Even though we can't get inside Riverview Manor, we can hunt through the outbuildings over there for the entrance to an underground passage to this house."

[1129] "All right," her friend agreed. "But this time you do the searching. I'll be the lookout."

[1130] Nancy chose the old smokehouse of Riverview Manor first, since this was closest to the Twin Elms property line. It yielded no clue and she moved on to the carriage house. But neither in this building, nor any of the others, did the girl detective find any indication of entrances to an underground passageway. Finally she gave up and rejoined Helen.

[1131] "If there is an opening, it must be from inside Riverview Manor," Nancy stated. "Oh, Helen, it's exasperating not to be able to get in there!"

[1132] "I wouldn't go in there now in any case," Helen remarked. "It's way past suppertime and I'm starved. Besides, pretty soon it'll be dark."

[1133] The girls returned to Twin Elms and ate supper. A short time later someone banged the front-door knocker. Both girls went to the door. They were amazed to find that the caller was Mr. Dodd, the realtor. He held out a large brass key toward Nancy.

[1134] "What's this for?" she asked, mystified.

Mr. Dodd smiled.

[1135] "It's the front-door key to Riverview Manor. I've decided that you can look around the mansion tomorrow morning all you please."

[1136] CHAPTER XIX. The Hidden Staircase.

[1137] SEEING the look of delight on Nancy's face, Mr. Dodd laughed. "Do you think that house is haunted as well as this one?" he asked. "I hear you like to solve mysteries."

[1138] "Yes, I do." Not wishing to reveal her real purpose to the realtor, the young sleuth also laughed. "Do you think I might find a ghost over there?" she countered.

[1139] "Well, I never saw one, but you never can tell," the man responded with a chuckle. He said he would leave the key with Nancy until Saturday evening and then pick it up. "If Mr. Comber should show up in the meantime, I have a key to the kitchen door that he can use."

[1140] Nancy thanked Mr. Dodd and with a grin said she would let him know if she found a ghost at Riverview Manor.

[1141] She could hardly wait for the next morning to arrive. Miss Flora was not told of the girls' plan to visit the neighboring house.

[1142] Immediately after breakfast, they set off for Riverview Manor. Aunt Rosemary went with them to the back door and wished the two good luck. "Promise me you won't take any chances," she begged.

[1143] "Promise," they said in unison.

[1144] With flashlights in their skirt pockets, Nancy and Helen hurried through the garden and into the grounds of Riverview Manor estate.

[1145] As they approached the front porch, Helen showed signs of nervousness. "Nancy, what will we do if we meet the ghost?" she asked.

[1146] "Just tell him we've found him out," her friend answered determinedly.

[1147] Helen said no more and watched as Nancy inserted the enormous brass key in the lock. It turned easily and the girls let themselves into the hall. Architecturally it was the same as Twin Elms mansion, but how different it looked now! The blinds were closed, lending an eerie atmosphere to the dusky interior. Dust lay everywhere, and cobwebs festooned the corners of the ceiling and spindles of the staircase.

[1148] "It certainly doesn't look as if anybody lives here," Helen remarked. "Where do we start hunting?"

[1149] "I want to take a look in the kitchen," said Nancy.

[1150] When they walked into it, Helen gasped. "I guess I was wrong. Someone has been eating here." Eggshells, several empty milk bottles, some chicken bones and pieces of waxed paper cluttered the sink.

[1151] Nancy, realizing that Helen was very uneasy, whispered to her with a giggle, "If the ghost lives here, he has a good appetite."

[1152] The young sleuth took out her flashlight and beamed it around the floors and walls of the kitchen. There was no sign of a secret opening. As she went from room to room on the first floor, Helen followed and together they searched every inch of the place for a clue to a concealed door. At last they came to the conclusion there was none.

[1153] "You know, it could be in the cellar," Nancy suggested.

[1154]     "Well, you're not going down there," Helen said firmly. "That is, not without a policeman. It's too dangerous. As for myself, I want to live to get married and not be hit over the head in the dark by that ghost, so Jim won't have a bride!"

[1155] Nancy laughed. "You win. But I'll tell you why. At the moment I am more interested in finding my father than in hunting for a secret passageway. He may be a prisoner in one of the rooms upstairs. I'm going to find out."

[1156] The door to the back stairway was unlocked and the one at the top stood open. Nancy asked Helen to stand at the foot of the main staircase, while she herself went up the back steps. "If that ghost is up there and tries to escape, he won't be able to slip out that way," she explained.

[1157] Helen took her post in the front hall and Nancy crept up the back steps. No one tried to come down either stairs. Helen now went to the second floor and together she and Nancy began a search of the rooms. They found nothing suspicious. Mr. Drew was not there. There was no sign of a ghost. None of the walls revealed a possible secret opening. But the bedroom which corresponded to Miss Flora's had a clothes closet built in at the end next to the fireplace.

[1158] "In Colonial times closets were a rarity," Nancy remarked to Helen. "I wonder if this closet was added at that time and has any special significance."

[1159] Quickly she opened one of the large double doors and looked inside. The rear wall was formed of two very wide wooden planks. In the center was a round knob, sunk in the wood.

[1160] "This is strange," Nancy remarked excitedly.

[1161] She pulled on the knob but the wall did not move. Next, she pushed the knob down hard, leaning her full weight against the panel.

[1162] Suddenly the wall pushed inward. Nancy lost her balance and disappeared into a gaping hole below!

[1163] Helen screamed.   "Nancy!"

[1164] Trembling with fright, Helen stepped into the closet and beamed her flashlight below. She could see a long flight of stone steps.

[1165] "Nancy! Nancy!" Helen called down.

[1166] A muffled answer came from below. Helen's heart gave a leap of relief. "Nancy's alive!" she told herself, then called, "Where are you?"

[1167] "I've found the secret passageway," came faintly to Helen's ears. "Come on down."

[1168] Helen did not hesitate. She wanted to be certain that Nancy was all right. Just as she started down the steps, the door began to close. Helen, in a panic that the girls might be trapped in some subterranean passageway, made a wild grab for the door. Holding it ajar, she removed the sweater she was wearing and wedged it into the opening.

[1169] Finding a rail on one side of the stone steps, Helen grasped it and hurried below. Nancy arose from the dank earthen floor to meet her.

[1170] "Are you sure you're all right?" Helen asked solicitously.

[1171] "I admit I got a good bang," Nancy replied, "but I feel fine now. Let's see where this passageway goes."

[1172] The flashlight had been thrown from her hand, but with the aid of Helen's light, she soon found it. Fortunately, it had not been damaged and she turned it on.

[1173] The passageway was very narrow and barely high enough for the girls to walk without bending over. The sides were built of crumbling brick and stone.

[1174] "This may tumble on us at any moment," Helen said worriedly.

[1175] "Oh, I don't believe so," Nancy answered. "It must have been here for a long time."

[1176] The subterranean corridor was unpleasantly damp and had an earthy smell. Moisture clung to the walls. They felt clammy and repulsive to the touch.

[1177] Presently the passageway began to twist and turn, as if its builders had found obstructions too difficult to dig through.

[1178] "Where do you think this leads?" Helen whispered.

[1179] "I don't know. I only hope we're not going in circles."

[1180] Presently the girls reached another set of stone steps not unlike the ones down which Nancy had tumbled. But these had solid stone sides. By their lights, the girls could see a door at the top with a heavy wooden bar across it.

[1181] "Shall we go up?" Helen asked.

[1182] Nancy was undecided what to do. The tunnel did not end here but yawned ahead in blackness. Should they follow it before trying to find out what was at the top of the stairs?

[1183] She voiced her thoughts aloud, but Helen urged that they climb the stairs. "I'll be frank with you. I'd like to get out of here."

[1184] Nancy acceded to her friend's wish and led the way up the steps.

[1185] Suddenly both girls froze in their tracks.

[1186] A man's voice from the far end of the tunnel commanded, "Stop! You can't go up there!"

[1187] CHAPTER XX. Nancy's Victory.

[1188] THEIR initial fright over, both girls turned and beamed their flashlights toward the foot of the stone stairway. Below them stood a short, unshaven, pudgy man with watery blue eyes.

[1189] "You're the ghost!" Helen stammered.

[1190] "And you're Mr. Willie Wharton," Nancy added.

Astounded, the man blinked in the glaring lights, then said, "Ye-yes, I am. But how did you know?"

[1191] "You live in the old Riverview Manor," Helen went on, "and you've been stealing food and silver and jewelry from Twin Elms!"

[1192] "No, no. I'm not a thief!" Willie Wharton cried out. "I took some food and I've been trying to scare the old ladies, so they would sell their property. Sometimes I wore false faces, but I never took any jewelry or silver. Honest I didn't. It must have been Mr. Gomber."

[1193] Nancy and Helen were amazed—Willie Wharton, with little urging from them, was confessing more than they had dared to hope.

[1194] "Did you know that Nathan Gomber is a thief?" Nancy asked the man.

[1195] Wharton shook his head. "I know he's sharp— that's why he's going to get me more money for my property from the railroad."

[1196] "Mr. Wharton, did you sign the original contract of sale?" Nancy queried.

[1197] "Yes, I did, but Mr. Gomber said that if I disappeared, for a while, he'd fix everything up so I'd get more money. He said he had a couple of other jobs which I could help him with. One of them was coming here to play ghost—it was a good place to disappear to. But I wish I had never seen Nathan Gomber or Riverview Manor or Twin Elms or had anything to do with ghosts."

[1198] "I'm glad to hear you say that," said Nancy. Then suddenly she asked, "Where's my father?"

[1199] Willie Wharton shifted his weight and looked about wildly. "I don't know, really I don't."

[1200] "But you kidnapped him in your car," the young sleuth prodded him. "We got a description of you from the taximan."

[1201] Several seconds went by before Willie Wharton answered. "I didn't know it was kidnapping. Mr. Gomber said your father was ill and that he was going to take him to a special doctor. He said Mr. Drew was coming on a train from Chicago and was going to meet Mr. Comber on the road halfway between here and the station. But Comber said he couldn't meet him—had other business to attend to. So I was to follow your father's taxi and bring him to Riverview Manor."

[1202] "Yes, yes, go on," Nancy urged, as Willie Wharton stopped speaking and covered his face with his hands.

[1203] "I didn't expect your father to be unconscious when I picked him up," Wharton went on. "Well, those men in the taxi put Mr. Drew in the back, of my car and I brought him here. Mr. Comber drove up from the other direction and said he would take over. He told me to come right here to Twin Elms and do some ghosting."

[1204] "And you have no idea where Mr. Comber took my father?" Nancy asked, with a sinking feeling.

[1205] "Nope."

[1206] In a few words she pointed out Nathan Comber's real character to Willie Wharton, hoping that if the man before her did know anything about Mr. Drew's whereabouts which he was not telling, he would confess. But from Wharton's emphatic answers and sincere offers to be of all the help he could in finding the missing lawyer. Nancy concluded that Wharton was not withholding any information.

[1207] "How did you find out about this passageway and the secret staircases?" Nancy questioned him.

[1208] "Comber found an old notebook under a heap of rubbish in the attic of Riverview Manor," Wharton answered. "He said it told everything about the secret entrances to the two houses. The passageways, with openings on each floor, were built when the houses were. They were used by the original Turnbulls in bad weather to get from one building to the other. This stairway was for the servants. The other two stairways were for the family. One of these led to Mr. Turnbull's bedroom in this house. The notebook also said that he often secretly entertained government agents and sometimes he had to hurry them out of the parlor and hide them in the passageway when callers came."

[1209] "Where does this stairway lead?" Helen spoke up.

[1210] "To the attic of Twin Elms."' Willie Wharton gave a little chuckle, "I know, Miss Drew, that you almost found the entrance. But the guys that built the place were pretty clever. Every opening has heavy double doors. When you poked that screw driver through the crack, you thought you were hitting another wall but it was really a door."

[1211] "Did you play the violin and turn on the radio —and make that thumping noise in the attic— and were you the one who laughed when we were up there?"

[1212] "Yes, and I moved the sofa to scare you and I even knew about the listening post. That's how I found out all your plans and could report them to Mr. Comber."

[1213] Suddenly it occurred to Nancy that Nathan Comber might appear on the scene at any moment. She must get Willie Wharton away and have him swear to his signature before he changed his mind!

[1214] "Mr. Wharton, -would you please go ahead of us up this stairway and open the doors?" she asked. "And go into Twin Elms with us and talk to Mrs. Turnbull and Mrs. Hayes? I want you to tell them that you've been playing ghost but aren't going to any longer. Miss Flora has been so frightened that she's ill and in bed."

[1215]  "I'm sorry about that," Willie Wharton replied. "Sure I'll go with you. I never want to see Nathan Comber again!"

[1216] He went ahead of the girls and took down the heavy wooden bar from across the door. He swung it wide, pulled a metal ring in the back of the adjoining door, then quickly stepped downward. The narrow panel opening which Nancy had suspected of leading to the secret stairway now was pulled inward. There was barely room alongside it to go up the top steps and into the attic. To keep Comber from becoming suspicious if he should arrive, Nancy asked Willie Wharton to close the secret door again.

[1217] "Helen," said Nancy, "will you please run downstairs ahead of Mr. Wharton and me and tell Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary the good news."

[1218] She gave Helen a three-minute start, then she and Willie Wharton followed. The amazed women were delighted to have the mystery solved. But there was no time for celebration.

[1219] "Mr. Barradale is downstairs to see you, Nancy," Aunt Rosemary announced.

[1220] Nancy turned to Willie Wharton. "Will you come down with me, please?"

[1221] She introduced both herself and the missing property owner to Mr. Barradale, then went on, "Mr. Wharton says the signature on the contract of sale is his own."

[1222] "And you'll swear to that?" the lawyer asked, turning to Willie.

[1223] "I sure will. I don't want anything more to do with this underhanded business," Willie Wharton declared.

[1224] "I know where I can find a notary public right away," Nancy spoke up, "Do you want me to phone him, Mr. Barradale?" she asked.

[1225] "Please do. At once."

[1226] Nancy dashed to the telephone and dialed the number of Albert Watson on Tuttle Road. When he answered, she told him the urgency of the situation and he promised to come over at once. Mr. Watson arrived within five minutes, with his notary equipment. Mr. Barradale showed him the contract of sale containing Willie Wharton's name and signature. Attached to it was the certificate of acknowledgment.

[1227] Mr. Watson asked Willie Wharton to raise his right hand and swear that he was the person named in the contract of sale. After this was done, the notary public filled in the proper places on the certificate, signed it, stamped the paper, and affixed his seal.

[1228] "Well, this is really a wonderful job, Miss Drew," Mr. Barradale praised her.

[1229] Nancy smiled, but her happiness at having accomplished a task for her father was dampened by the fact that she still did not know where he was. Mr. Barradale and Willie Wharton also were extremely concerned.

[1230] "I'm going to call Captain Rossland and ask him to send some policemen out here at once," Nancy stated. "What better place for Mr. Comber to hide my father than somewhere along that passageway? How far does it go, Mr. Wharton?"

[1231] "Mr. Comber says it goes all the way to the river, but the end of it is completely stoned up now. I never went any farther than the stairways."

[1232] The young lawyer thought Nancy's idea a good one, because if Nathan Comber should return to Riverview Manor and find that Willie was gone, he would try to escape.

[1233] The police promised to come at once. Nancy had just finished talking with Captain Rossland when Helen Corning called from the second floor, "Nancy, can you come up here? Miss Flora insists upon seeing the hidden staircase."

[1234] The young sleuth decided that she would just about have time to do this before the arrival of the police. Excusing herself to Mr. Barradale, she ran up the stairs. Aunt Rosemary had put on A rose-colored dressing gown while attending her mother. To Nancy's amazement, Mrs. Turnbull was fully dressed and wore a white blouse with a high collar and a black skirt.

[1235] Nancy and Helen led the way to the attic. There, the girl detective, crouching on her knees, opened the secret door.

[1236] "And all these years I never knew it was here!" Miss Flora exclaimed.

[1237] "And I doubt that my father did or he would have mentioned it," Aunt Rosemary added.

[1238] Nancy closed the secret door and they all went downstairs. She could hear the front-door bell ringing and assumed that it was the police. She and Helen hurried below. Captain Rossland and another officer stood there. They said other men had surrounded Riverview Manor, hoping to catch Nathan Comber if he did arrive there.

[1239] With Willie Wharton leading the way, the girls, Mr. Barradale, and the police trooped to the attic and went down the hidden staircase to the dank passageway below.

[1240] "I have a hunch from reading about old passageways that there may be one or more rooms off this tunnel," Nancy told Captain Rossland.

[1241] There were so many powerful flashlights in play now that the place was almost as bright as daylight. As the group moved along, they suddenly came to a short stairway. Willie Wharton explained that this led to an opening back of the sofa in the parlor. There was still another stone stairway which went up to Miss Flora's bedroom with an opening alongside the fireplace.

[1242] The searchers went on. Nancy, who was ahead of the others, discovered a padlocked iron door in the wall. Was it a dungeon? She had heard of such places being used for prisoners in Colonial times.

[1243] By this time Captain Rossland had caught up to her. "Do you think your father may be in there?" he asked.

[1244] "I'm terribly afraid so," said Nancy, shivering at the thought of what she might find.

[1245] The officer found that the lock was very rusty. Pulling from his pocket a penknife with various tool attachments, he soon had the door unlocked and flung it wide. He beamed his light into the blackness beyond. It was indeed a room without windows.

[1246] Suddenly Nancy cried out, "Dad!" and sprang ahead.

[1247] Lying on blankets on the floor, and covered with others, was Mr. Drew. He was murmuring faintly.

[1248] "He's alive!" Nancy exclaimed, kneeling down to pat his face and kiss him.

[1249] "He's been drugged," Captain Rossland observed. "I'd say Nathan Comber has been giving your father just enough food to keep him alive and mixing sleeping powders in with it."

[1250] From his trousers pocket the officer brought out a small vial of restorative and held it to Mr. Drew's nose. In a few moments the lawyer shook his head, and a few seconds later, opened his eyes.

[1251] "Keep talking to your dad," the captain ordered Nancy.

[1252] "Dad! Wake up! You're all right! We've rescued you!"

[1253] Within a very short time Mr. Drew realized that his daughter was kneeling beside him. Reaching out his arms from beneath the blankets, he tried to hug her.

[1254] "We'll take him upstairs," said Captain Rossland. "Willie, open that secret entrance to the parlor."

[1255] "Glad to be of help." Wharton hurried ahead and up the short flight of steps.

[1256] In the meantime, the other three men lifted Mr. Drew and carried him along the passageway. By the tune they reached the stairway, Willie Wharton had opened the secret door behind the sofa in the parlor. Mr. Drew was placed on the couch. He blinked, looked around, and then said in astonishment:

[1257] "Willie Wharton! How did you get here? Nancy, tell me the whole story."

[1258] The lawyer's robust health and sturdy constitution had stood him in good stead. He recovered with amazing rapidity from his ordeal and listened in rapt attention as one after another of those in the room related the events of the past few days.

[1259] As the story ended, there was a knock on the front door and another police officer was admitted. He had come to report to Captain Rossland that not only had Nathan Comber been captured outside of Riverview Manor, and all the loot recovered, but also that the final member of the group who had abducted Mr. Drew had been taken into custody. Comber had admitted everything, even to having attempted to injure Nancy and her father with the truck at the River Heights' bridge project. He had tried to frighten Miss Flora into selling Twin Elms because he had planned to start a housing project on the two Turn-bull properties.

[1260] "It's a real victory for you!" Nancy's father praised his daughter proudly.

[1261] The young sleuth smiled. Although she was glad it was all over, she could not help but look forward to another mystery to solve. One soon came her way when, quite accidentally, she found herself involved in The Bungalow Mystery.

[1262] Miss Flora and Aunt Rosemary had come downstairs to meet Mr. Drew. While they were talking to him, the police officer left, taking Willie Wharton with him as a prisoner. Mr. Barradale also said good-by. Nancy and Helen slipped out of the room and went to the kitchen.

[1263] "We'll prepare a super-duper lunch to celebrate this occasion!" said Helen happily.

[1264] "And we can make all the plans we want," Nancy replied with a grin. "There won't be anyone at the listening post!"

English source.

genre:

Старинная литература

Authors:

Carolyn Keene

Book title: The Hidden Staircase

Annotation

sequence name="Nancy Drew Mystery Stories" number="2"

Русский источник.

genre:

Детские остросюжетные

Authors:

Кэролайн Кин

Book title: Тайна загадочной лестницы

sequence name="Нэнси Дру" number="0"

Примечания


1

Кэролайн КИН

Тайна загадочной лестницы

2

ДОМ, ПОСЕЩАЕМЫЙ ПРИЗРАКАМИ

3

Телефон, стоявший в прихожей, зазвонил. Нэнси Дру взбежала по ступенькам крыльца, а оттуда кинулась в прихожую, по дороге стаскивая с рук садовые перчатки.

— Алло! — крикнула она, сняв трубку.

4

— Нэнси, привет! Это Эллен. — Хотя Эллен Корнинг была почти на три года старше Нэнси, между девушками установилась тесная дружба.

5

— Ты сейчас ни над каким делом не работаешь? — спросила Эллен.

6

— Нет. А что случилось? Опять какая-нибудь загадочная история?

7

— Да. Дом, посещаемый призраками.

8

Нэнси уселась в кресло, стоявшее возле телефонного аппарата.

— Расскажи поподробнее! — возбуждённо попросила восемнадцатилетняя сыщица.

9

— Я тебе рассказывала о моей тёте Розмари, — начала Эллен. — С тех пор как она овдовела, она живёт со своей матерью в «Двух вязах», старинном семейном особняке в Клифвуде. Так вот, вчера я была у них, и они мне сообщили, что в последнее время там происходят всевозможные таинственные явления, Я рассказала им, как ты здорово распутываешь всяческие загадки, и они бы очень хотели, чтобы ты приехала к ним домой и помогла им. — Задохнувшись от длинной тирады, Эллен умолкла.

10

— Звучит весьма интригующе, — ответила Нэнси, у которой глаза так и плясали.

11

— Если ты не занята, мы бы с тётей Розмари заехали к тебе примерно через час и потолковали бы насчёт призрака.

12

— Приезжайте как можно скорее!

13

Положив трубку, Нэнси несколько минут сидела, погрузившись в задумчивость. С тех пор как она разрешила последнюю свою тайну, ей ужасно хотелось поработать ещё над каким-нибудь делом. И вот случай представился!

14

Из состояния мечтательной задумчивости её вывел звонок в дверь. В прихожую тут же спустилась сверху домоправительница семейства Дру, Ханна Груин.

15

— Я открою! — крикнула она.

16

Миссис Груин поселилась у них, когда Нэнси было всего три годика. Её мама, миссис Дру, скончалась, и Ханна стала для Нэнси чем-то вроде второй матери. Они были крепко привязаны друг к другу, и Нэнси поверяла домоправительнице, всегда прекрасно её понимавшей, все свои секреты.

17

Миссис Груин открыла дверь, и в прихожую стремительно шагнул какой-то мужчина. Он был маленького роста, худой, сутуловатый. По мнению Нэнси, лет ему было около сорока.

18

— Мистер Дру дома? — бесцеремонно спросил он. — Моя фамилия — Гомбер, Натан Гомбер.

19

— Нет, в данный момент он отсутствует, — ответила домоправительница.

20

Глядя через плечо Ханны Груин, посетитель уставился на Нэнси.

— Вы — Нэнси Дру?

21

— Да. Чем могу служить?

22

Бегающие глазки мужчины останавливались то на Нэнси, то на Ханне.

— Я пришёл исключительно по своей сердечной доброте — предупредить вас и вашего отца, — торжественным тоном произнёс он.

23

— Предупредить? О чём? — быстро спросила Нэнси.

24

Натан Гомбер выпрямился с важным видом и сказал:

— Вашему отцу грозит серьёзная опасность, мисс Дру! Нэнси и Ханна Груин так и ахнули.

— Вы хотите сказать, в эту самую минуту? — спросила домоправительница.

25

— Всё время, — поразил их своим ответом посетитель. — Насколько я знаю, вы довольно сообразительная девушка, мисс Дру, вы даже разгадываете всевозможные тайны. Ну так вот, в данный момент я рекомендую вам держаться поближе к вашему отцу. Не оставляйте его в одиночестве ни на минуту.

26

У Ханны Груин был такой вид, словно она вот-вот упадёт в обморок. Она предложила всем пройти в гостиную, сесть и все как следует обсудить. Когда они уселись, Нэнси попросила Натана Гомбера объясниться поподробнее.

27

— Коротко говоря, дело сводится к следующему, — начал он. — Вам известно, что ваш отец был приглашён железной дорогой в качестве юридического консультанта в тот момент, когда она занималась приобретением земельной собственности для строительства в этом районе моста.

28

Нэнси утвердительно кивнула, и он продолжал.

— Ну так вот, очень многие из тех, кто продал тогда свою собственность, считают, что их надули. Нэнси покраснела.

— Насколько я знаю со слов отца, всем было хорошо заплачено. ,

29

— Это неправда, — сказал Гомбер. — Кроме того, железная дорога сейчас находится в весьма плачевном состоянии. Один из владельцев земельной собственности, чьё согласие на продажу участка и собственноручная подпись у них якобы имеется, говорит, что он никогда не подписывал контракт о продаже.

30

— Как его фамилия? — спросила Нэнси.

31

— Вилли Уортон.

32

Нэнси никогда не слышала от отца этого имени. Она попросила Гомбера продолжать свой рассказ.

— Я выступаю в качестве агента Вилли Уортона и ещё нескольких землевладельцев, его соседей, — сказал он, — и они могут устроить железной дороге большие неприятности. Подпись Вилли Уортона никогда не была никем засвидетельствована, а приложенный к договору документ не был нотариально оформлен. Это — верное доказательство того, что подпись была подделана. Ну что ж, если железная дорога полагает, что это сойдёт ей с рук, она очень ошибается!

33

Нэнси нахмурилась. Протесты со стороны владельцев земельной собственностью грозили неприятностями её отцу. Она сказала ровным голосом:

Но единственное, что Вилли Уортону надо сделать, — это торжественно поклясться в присутствии нотариуса, что он действительно подписал контракт о продаже.

34

Гомбер усмехнулся.

— Это не так-то легко, мисс Дру. Вилли Уортона нигде нет. Кое-кто из нас догадывается, где он находится, и в надлежащий момент мы его представим. Но этот момент наступит лишь после того, как железная дорога пообещает заплатить более высокую цену тем, кто продал свои участки. Тогда и он подпишет. Видите ли, Вилли по-настоящему добрый человек, и он стремится помогать своим друзьям всегда, когда для этого представляется возможность. Теперь такая возможность имеется.

35

Гомбер не понравился Нэнси с первой же минуты, а теперь эта неприязнь многократно усилилась. Она отнесла его к разряду людей, которые стремятся оставаться в рамках закона, но при этом их нравственность весьма сомнительна. Это действительно ставило перед мистером Дру серьёзную проблему.

36

— Кто эти люди, которые могут причинить ущерб моему отцу? — спросила она.

37

— Я их не назову, — отрезал Натан Гомбер. — Вы, похоже, не слишком цените сам факт моего прихода сюда, чтобы предупредить вас. Какая же вы дочь после этого! Вам безразлично, что будет с вашим отцом!

38

Возмущённые наглостью гостя, Нэнси и миссис Груин демонстративно поднялись. Домоправительница указала на входную дверь и сказала:

— Всего хорошего, мистер Гомбер! Тот также поднялся и пожал плечами.

— Ну что ж, будь по-вашему, но не говорите потом, что я вас не предупреждал!

39

Он подошёл к парадной двери, открыл её и, выйдя на улицу, с грохотом захлопнул за собой.

40

— Как тебе нравится? Ну и наглец! — возмущённо фыркнула Ханна.

41

Нэнси кивнула.

— Но это ещё не самое худшее, дорогая моя Ханна. Я думаю, что предостережение Гомбера заключает в себе больше, чем он говорит. Похоже, что за этим скрывается некая угроза. И он почти меня убедил. Может быть, мне надо быть около папы, пока он и другие юристы не распутают эту неувязку с железной дорогой.

42

Она добавила, что из-за этого ей придётся отказаться от дела, за которое её просили взяться. Нэнси коротко пересказала Ханне основное содержание своего разговора с Эллен относительно дома, посещаемого призраками.

— Эллен и её тётя скоро будут здесь и расскажут нам обо всем подробно.

43

— Ах, да может быть, дела вовсе не обстоят для твоего отца так серьёзно, как пытался представить этот ужасный тип, — ободряюще проговорила Ханна. — Я бы на твоём месте выслушала подробности насчёт дома, где появляются призраки, и уже после этого приняла бы решение, участвовать ли тебе в разгадке этой тайны или нет.

44

В скором времени на петляющей, обсаженной деревьями подъездной дорожке дома Дру показался спортивный автомобиль, остановившийся возле парадного. Большой кирпичный дом стоял в некотором отдалении от улицы.

45

За рулём сидела Эллен. Она помогла своей тёте выйти из машины, и они вместе поднялись по входным ступеням. Миссис Хэйз была высокая стройная женщина с седеющими волосами. Выражение её лица было мягким, но она выглядела усталой.

46

Эллен представила свою тётю Нэнси и Ханне, после чего все они направились в гостиную и уселись. Ханна предложила приготовить чай и вышла из комнаты.

47

— О, Нэнси, — воскликнула Эллен, — я так надеюсь, что ты сможешь заняться делом тёти Розмари и мисс Флоры. — Она быстро объяснила, что мисс Флора — мать её тётки. — Тётя Розмари на самом деле моя двоюродная бабушка, а мисс Флора — моя прабабушка. Ещё с тех пор, когда она была совсем маленькой девочкой, все называли и продолжают до сих пор её называть «мисс Флора». »

48

— Людям, которые слышат это имя впервые, оно может показаться странным, — заметила миссис Хэйз, — но мы все так к нему привыкли, что совсем об этом не думаем.

49

— Пожалуйста, расскажите мне поподробнее о вашем доме, — попросила с улыбкой Нэнси.

50

— Мы с мамой дошли уже до настоящего нервного истощения, — ответила миссис Хэйз. — Я все уговариваю её уехать из «Двух вязов», но она отказывается. Видите ли, мама живёт там с тех самых пор, как вышла замуж за моего отца, Эверетта Тернбулла.

51

Далее миссис Хэйз рассказала, что за последние недели две у них в доме стали происходить всевозможные странности. Они слышали музыку, исходившую неизвестно откуда, по ночам раздавался какой-то непонятный топот и скрипы, на стенах появлялись причудливые неописуемые тени.

52

— Вы обратились в полицию? — спросила Нэнси.

53

— Да, конечно, — ответила миссис Хэйз. — Но, поговорив с моей матерью, они пришли к заключению, что большую часть явлений, которые она наблюдала, вполне можно объяснить естественными причинами. А что касается остального, то, по их словам, это, вероятнее всего, просто плод её воображения. Видите ли, ей больше восьмидесяти, и, хотя я знаю, что рассудок у неё совершенно здравый и ясный, боюсь, что полиция этого мнения не разделяет.

54

Помолчав немного, миссис Хэйз продолжала:

— Я уже почти уговорила себя, что призрачные звуки могут вызываться естественными причинами, но тут произошло ещё одно событие.

55

— Что именно? — с любопытством спросила Нэнси.

56

— Нас ограбили! Ночью унесли несколько старинных драгоценностей. Я позвонила в полицию, и они приехали к нам, чтобы получить описание пропавших вещей. И всё-таки они не хотели соглашаться с тем, что их мог захватить какой-нибудь «призрачный» посетитель.

57

Прежде чем высказать своё мнение по поводу услышанного, Нэнси немного подумала.

— А у полиции есть какие-нибудь соображения насчёт того, кто мог оказаться вором? — спросила она. Тётя Розмари покачала головой.

— Нет. И я боюсь, что мы можем подвергнуться новым грабежам.

58

В голове Нэнси проносилось множество всевозможных идей. Одна из них состояла в том, что вор, по-видимому, не собирался никому причинять вреда и что его единственной целью было хищение. Был ли именно он тем «призраком», который посещал дом? Или, может быть, все эти странные события имели какое-то естественное объяснение, как и предполагала полиция?

59

В этот момент возвратилась Ханна с большим серебряным подносом в руках, на котором был расставлен чайный сервиз и стояла тарелка с аппетитными сэндвичами. Она поставила поднос на стол и попросила Нэнси разлить чай. Сама же она передавала гостям чашки и сэндвичи.

60

Пока они ели, Эллен сказала:

— Тётя Розмари не рассказала вам и половины происшедших событий. Однажды мисс Флоре показалось, что в полночь она видела кого-то, вылезавшего из камина, в другой раз кресло переместилось из одного конца комнаты в другой, пока она стояла спиной к нему. Но в комнате никого не было!

61

— Как странно! — воскликнула Ханна Груин. — Я не раз читала о подобных вещах, но никогда не думала, что встречусь с кем-то, кто живёт в доме, посещаемом призраками.

62

Эллен повернулась к Нэнси и умоляюще поглядела на подругу.

— Ты видишь, как ты нужна в «Двух вязах»? Ну, пожалуйста, поедем со мной туда, и разреши ты эту тайну относительно призрака!

63

ЗАГАДОЧНОЕ ПРОИСШЕСТВИЕ

64

Попивая чай, Эллен Корнинг и её тётка ждали решения Нэнси. Юная сыщица стояла перед дилеммой. Ей очень хотелось немедленно приступить к разгадке тайны «призрака» в «Двух вязах». Но в её ушах все ещё звучало предостережение Натана Гомбера, и она понимала, что первейший её долг — оставаться рядом с отцом.

65

Наконец она заговорила.

— Миссис Хэйз, — начала она.

66

— Пожалуйста, называй меня тётя Розмари, — попросила гостья. — Так меня зовут все друзья Эллен. Нэнси улыбнулась.

— С удовольствием, тётя Розмари, могу я дать вам окончательный ответ сегодня вечером или завтра? Мне надо поговорить насчёт этого дела с отцом. И кроме того, сегодня произошло нечто такое, что может меня, по крайней мере на время, задержать дома.

67

— Я понимаю, — сказала миссис Хэйз, пытаясь скрыть своё разочарование.

68

Эллен Корнинг отнеслась к заявлению Нэнси не столь спокойно.

— Ах, Нэнси, но ты просто должна приехать! Я уверена, что твой папа захочет нам помочь. Разве ты не можешь отложить другое дело до тех пор, когда возвратишься от нас?

69

— Боюсь, что нет, — сказала Нэнси. — Я не могу посвятить вас во все детали, но папе грозит опасность, и я считаю, что должна быть около него.

70

Ханна Груин добавила собственные страхи:

— Один Бог знает, что они могут сделать с мистером Дру. Кто-нибудь может прийти и ударить его по голове, или отравить еду, которую он закажет себе в ресторане, или…

71

Эллен и её тётка так и ахнули.

— Да неужели дело обстоит так серьёзно? — спросила Эллен, широко раскрыв глаза.

72

Нэнси объяснила, что, когда отец вернётся, она с ним переговорит.

— Мне страшно неприятно вас разочаровывать, но вы сами видите, в каком я затруднительном положении.

73

— Бедняжка! — сочувственно вздохнула миссис Хэйз. — Ну ладно, о нас-то хоть не беспокойтесь! Нэнси улыбнулась.

— Я всё равно буду беспокоиться, смогу ли я к вам приехать или нет. В общем, так или иначе, я сегодня вечером поговорю с папой.

74

Вскоре после этого посетители ушли. Когда дверь за ними закрылась, Ханна обняла Нэнси за плечи.

— Я уверена, что все закончится для всех благополучно, — сказала она. — Прости, что я говорила о всяческих ужасах, которые могут стрястись с твоим отцом. Я дала волю своему воображению — вот так же, как мисс Флора, говорят, даёт волю своей фантазии.

75

— Ты — большая для меня поддержка, дорогая моя Ханна, — ответила Нэнси. — По правде говоря, я и сама думала о всяческих ужасах. — Она начала шагать по комнате. — Как бы я хотела, чтобы папа поскорее вернулся!

76

На протяжении следующего часа она раз десять подходила к окну в надежде увидеть машину отца, сворачивающую на их улицу. Только в шесть часов она услышала наконец скрежет колёс на подъездной дорожке и увидела, как машина отца въезжает в гараж.

77

— Он в безопасности! — крикнула она Ханне, которая проверяла, готова ли картошка, запекавшаяся в печи.

78

Нэнси пулей выскочила через заднюю дверь и кинулась навстречу отцу.

— Ах, папа, как я рада тебя видеть! — воскликнула она. Она горячо его обняла и звонко чмокнула в щеку. Он отвечал ей ласково, но тихонько посмеивался.

— Чем это, я заслужил такое повышенное внимание? — поддразнивая, спросил он дочь. Подмигнув, он добавил: — Я знаю. Свидание, назначенное у тебя на вечер, отменено, и ты хочешь, чтобы я взял на себя роль кавалера?!

79

— Ах, папа, — ответила Нэнси. — Моё свидание, разумеется, вовсе не отменено. Но я как раз собираюсь его отменить.

80

— Это ещё почему? — поинтересовался отец. — Разве Дерк не остаётся в твоём списке?

81

— Дело не в этом, — возразила Нэнси. — Дело в том, что… что ты находишься в страшной опасности, папа. Меня предупредили, чтобы я не оставляла тебя одного.

82

Вместо того чтобы встревожиться, отец рассмеялся.

— В какой такой опасности? Уж не собираешься ли ты учинить налёт на мой кошелёк?

83

— Папа, отнесись к этому серьёзно! Я ничего не выдумываю. Сюда приходил Натан Гомбер и сказал мне, что тебе грозит большая опасность и мне лучше всё время быть рядом с тобой.

84

Юрист мигом стал серьёзным.

— Опять это наказание божье! — воскликнул он. — Бывают моменты, когда мне хочется поколотить этого типа так, чтобы он запросил пощады!

85

Мистер Дру предложил отложить разговор о Натане Гомбере на послеобеденное время. Он обещал познакомить дочь с истинными обстоятельствами дела. Когда они пообедали, Ханна настояла на том, что она сама уберёт все со стола и вымоет посуду, чтобы отец с дочерью могли поговорить.

86

— Я готов признать, что в вопросе о железнодорожном мосте есть некоторая путаница, — начал мистер Дру. — Дело в том, что юрист, отправившийся получить подпись Вилли Уортона на документе, был в тот момент очень болен. К сожалению, он не позаботился о том, чтобы подпись была кем-либо засвидетельствована, и не оформил должным образом приложенный к контракту документ. Бедняга спустя несколько часов после этого умер.

87

— А остальные юристы управления железной дороги не заметили, что подпись не заверена, а документ не оформлен нотариусом? — спросила Нэнси.

88

— Во всяком случае, заметили не сразу. Этот вопрос всплыл на поверхность лишь после того, как вдова того человека передала его служебный портфель правлению железной дороги. Старая купчая на участок Уортона была на месте, поэтому юристы решили, что подпись на документе подлинная. Был заключён контракт на строительство железнодорожного моста, и работы начались. И тут вдруг появился Натан Гомбер, заявивший, что он представляет Вилли Уортона и других лиц, владевших собственностью на землю по обе стороны реки Мускока, купленную железной дорогой.

89

— Со слов мистера Гомбера я поняла, — сказала Нэнси, — что, требуя более высокой платы за свой участок, Вилли Уортон пытается выторговать побольше денег для своих соседей.

90

— Так это изображается. Я лично считаю, что это не что иное, как мошенничество со стороны Гомбера. Чем больше будет людей, для которых он сможет выговорить дополнительные суммы, тем выше будут его комиссионные, — заявил мистер Дру.

91

— Какая неразбериха! — воскликнула Нэнси. — Ну, и что можно поделать?

92

— По правде говоря, пока не найдут Вилли Уортона, вряд ли кто-либо может что-либо сделать. Гомберу это, конечно, известно, и он, вероятно, посоветовал Уортону скрываться до тех пор, пока железная дорога не согласится заплатить всем побольше.

93

Нэнси внимательно следила за отцом. Она увидела, что лицо его заметно оживилось.

— Но я думаю, мне удастся перехитрить мистера Натана Гомбера. Мне передали, что Вилли Уортон находится в Чикаго, и в понедельник утром я отправляюсь выяснить, так ли это.

94

Мистер Дру продолжал:

— Я думаю, что Уортон признает, что он подписал акт о продаже, имеющийся в распоряжении железнодорожной компании, и охотно даст согласие на нотариальное оформление документа. Конечно, в таком случае железная дорога не заплатит ни ему, ни кому-либо из остальных владельцев земельных участков ни одного цента сверх оговорённой цены.

95

— Но, папа, ты всё-таки не убедил меня в том, что тебе никакая опасность не угрожает, — напомнила ему Нэнси.

96

— Нэнси, дорогая, — ответил ей отец, — я просто чувствую, что я вне опасности. Гомбер — не более чем хвастунишка. Я сомневаюсь, чтобы он, Вилли Уортон или кто-либо из других собственников земли решились бы прибегнуть к насилию, чтобы помешать мне участвовать в этом деле. Он просто пытается меня запугать, чтобы убедить железную дорогу согласиться на его требования.

97

Нэнси смотрела на него скептически.

— Но не забудь, что ты собираешься в Чикаго, чтобы найти того самого человека, которого Гомбер и другие земельные собственники не хотели бы сейчас здесь видеть.

98

— Я знаю, — кивнул мистер Дру. — Но я всё-таки сомневаюсь, чтобы кто-либо применил силу, чтобы помешать мне поехать. — Смеясь, он добавил:

— Так что, Нэнси, в качестве телохранителя ты мне будешь не нужна.

99

Дочь его вздохнула в знак того, что примиряется с неизбежным.

— Ну что ж, папа, тебе виднее, — сказала она. После этого она посвятила отца в загадочные события, творящиеся в «Двух вязах», и сообщила ему, что её попросили разгадать эту тайну. — Если ты не против, — сказала Нэнси в заключение, — я бы хотела поехать туда с Эллен.

100

Мистер Дру слушал с большим интересом. После короткого раздумья он улыбнулся.

— Ради бога, Нэнси, поезжай. Я понимаю, как тебе не терпится поработать над новым делом — а этот случай представляется действительно интересным. Только, пожалуйста, будь осторожней.

101

— Ну, конечно, папа! — пообещала Нэнси, лицо которой так и загорелось от радости. — Огромное тебе спасибо! — Она вскочила с кресла, поцеловала отца и направилась к телефону, чтобы сообщить Эллен радостную новость. Было решено, что девушки отправятся в «Два вяза» в понедельник утром.

102

Нэнси вернулась в гостиную, горя желанием ещё поговорить о загадке, которую ей предстояло разрешить. Но её отец посмотрел на часы и сказал:

— Знаешь что, барышня, ты лучше переоденься перед свиданием. — Он подмигнул. — Я знаю, что Дерк не любит, чтобы его заставляли ждать.

103

— Особенно когда это происходит из-за какой-нибудь из моих тайн. — Она засмеялась и поспешила наверх переодеться в бальное платье.

104

Спустя полчаса появился Дерк Джэксон. Нэнси и рыжеволосый юноша, бывший школьный чемпион по теннису, поехали забрать ещё одну пару. Все они должны были присутствовать на любительском спектакле и танцах, которые устраивала местная Малая театральная группа.

105

Нэнси получила от вечера огромное удовольствие и очень сожалела, когда всё кончилось. Пообещав Дерку снова с ним встретиться, как только вернётся из «Двух вязов» Нэнси пожелала ему спокойной ночи и помахала, стоя на пороге, вслед удалявшейся машине юноши. Готовясь ко сну, она думала о пьесе, об отличном оркестре, о том, как ей повезло, что она встречается с таким парнем, как Дерк, и о том, какой замечательный был вечер. Но потом её мысли перешли на Эллен Корнинг и её родственников в посещаемом призраками доме «Два вяза».

106

Засыпая, она пробормотала:

— Хоть бы поскорее наступило утро понедельника.

107

На следующее утро она вместе с отцом была в церкви. Ханна сказала, что пойдёт днём на особое богослужение, а потому утром останется дома.

108

— Я приготовлю для вас хороший обед, — объявила она, когда отец с дочерью уходили.

109

После окончания церковной службы мистер Дру сказал, что хотел бы подъехать к реке, чтобы посмотреть, как продвигается строительство нового моста.

— Строительство ведётся сейчас на той стороне реки, — сказал он.

110

— А собственность Уортона находится на этой стороне? — спросила Нэнси.

111

— Да. И я должен добраться до истины в этом запутанном деле, с тем чтобы работы могли начаться и на этой стороне.

112

Мистер Дру петлял по многочисленным улицам, которые вели к реке Мускока, а потом поехал по автомобильному мосту. Он повернул в сторону строительной площадки и наконец остановил машину. Когда он и Нэнси вышли из автомобиля, он грустно посмотрел на её туфли-лодочки.

113

— Подойти к реке будет трудновато, — сказал он. — Может, тебе лучше здесь подождать?

114

— Да что ты, ничего со мной не случится, — заверила его Нэнси. — Мне бы хотелось посмотреть, что там делается.

115

На земле стояли всевозможные машины: кран, лебёдка, гидравлические землечерпалки. Направляясь к реке, отец и дочь прошли мимо большого грузовика. Он стоял, обращённый лицом к реке, на самой вершине небольшого склона, как раз над двумя из четырёх громадных бетонных свай, которые уже были построены.

116

— Наверное, такие же сваи будут на другом берегу, — заметила Нэнси, когда они с отцом вышли на берег. Они на минутку остановились между двумя огромными опорами. Мистер Дру переводил глаза из стороны в сторону, как если бы он что-то услышал. Вдруг Нэнси расслышала какой-то шум у них за спиной.

117

Повернувшись, она с ужасом увидела, что большой грузовик движется прямо на них. За рулём никого не было, и огромная машина с каждой секундой набирала скорость.

118

— Папа! — завопила она.

119

В какой-то миг показалось, что грузовик прямо-таки прыгнул к воде. Нэнси и её отец, зажатые с боков бетонными опорами, казалось, неизбежно должны были быть раздавлены.

120

— Ныряй! — приказал мистер Дру.

121

Не колеблясь, он и Нэнси нырнули в воду, и, отчаянно работая руками и ногами, отплыли подальше от грозившей им громадины.

122

Грузовик с грохотом свалился в воду и погрузился до самой кабины. Отец с дочерью повернули и вышли на берег.

123

— Фу ты! Прямо чудом спаслись! — воскликнул мистер Дру, помогая дочери вызволить её туфли, завязшие в прибрежном иле.

— Ну и вид же у нас! — вскричала Нэнси.

124

— Да уж! — согласился отец. Они с трудом карабкались по склону наверх. — Хотелось бы мне добраться до рабочего, который допустил такую небрежность — оставил тяжёлый грузовик на склоне, не позаботившись как следует закрепить тормоза!

125

Нэнси не была уверена, что этот инцидент, чуть не ставший несчастным случаем, был вызван небрежностью рабочего. Натан Гомбер предупредил её, что жизнь мистера Дру в опасности. Возможно, угрозу уже начали приводить в исполнение!

126

УКРАДЕННОЕ ОЖЕРЕЛЬЕ

127

— Давай-ка поскорее вернёмся домой и переоденемся, — сказал мистер Дру. — И я позвоню компании, выполняющей контракт на строительство моста, и расскажу им, что произошло.

128

— Может, следует и полицию известить, — заметила Нэнси,

129

Она бросилась на сиденье позади отца и стала оглядывать окружающую местность в поисках уличающих следов. И вдруг она увидела несколько следов у края той маленькой площадки, где стоял грузовик,

130

— Папа! — крикнула юная сыщица. — Я, возможно, нашла объяснение того, каким образом грузовик вдруг покатил вниз по склону.

131

Отец вернулся к тому месту и вгляделся в следы. Они явно были оставлены не башмаками рабочего.

132

— Ты можешь меня считать паникёршей, папа, — заявила Нэнси, — но эти следы, оставленные ботинками мужчины, убеждают меня в том, что кто-то сознательно пытался направить на нас этот грузовик.

133

Юрист молча смотрел на свою дочь. Потом он перевёл глаза на землю. Судя по размеру ботинка и длине шага, легко было прийти к выводу, что хозяин ботинок был невысок ростом. Нэнси спросила отца, считает ли он, что в происшедшем может быть виновен кто-нибудь из рабочих, занятых на стройке.

134

— Я просто не могу поверить в то, что кто-либо, связан-с компанией-подрядчиком, мог бы захотеть причинить ч физическое увечье, — ответил ей отец. Нэнси напомнила ему о предостережении Гомбера.

— Это мог быть кто-нибудь из земельных собственников или даже сам Вилли Уортон.

135

— Уортон — человек небольшого роста, и ноги у него маленькие, — согласился мистер Дру. — И я должен признать, что следы на вид совсем свежие. Собственно говоря, они свидетельствуют о том, что, кто бы здесь ни был, он поспешно скрылся. Он мог отпустить тормоз грузовика, спрыгнуть с подножки и убежать.

136

— Да, — согласилась Нэнси. — А из этого следует, что нападение было сознательным.

137

Мистер Дру не ответил. Он продолжал подниматься вверх по холму, углубившись в свои мысли. Нэнси шла за ним следом. Они сели в свою машину. Домой ехали молча, каждый размышляя про себя о странном инциденте с как бы сорвавшимся с цепи грузовиком. Когда они добрались до дома, их встретили громкими удивлёнными криками.

138

— Мать родная! — вскричала Ханна Груин. — Что такое стряслось с вами?

139

Они торопливо рассказали, а потом поспешили наверх — помыться и переодеться, К тому времени, когда они снова спустились на первый этаж, Ханна успела поставить на стол стаканы шербета, в котором плавали кусочки апельсина и грейпфрута. Обед был восхитительный: жареный ягнёнок с рисом, грибами и свежим горошком, шоколадный «ангельский бисквит» со взбитыми сливками и ванильным мороженым. Разговор всё время вертелся вокруг тайны железнодорожного моста, а затем перешёл на посещаемый призраками особняк «Два вяза».

140

— Я знала, что долго здесь мир не удержится, — заметила с улыбкой Ханна Груин. — Завтра вы оба станете участниками больших приключений. Желаю вам обоим удачи.

141

— Спасибо, Ханна, — отозвалась Нэнси. Она засмеялась. — Мне, пожалуй, следует хорошенько выспаться, потому что потом мне, возможно, не дадут глаз сомкнуть призраки и разные странные звуки.

142

Домоправительница сказала:

— Меня немножко тревожит твоя поездка в «Два вяза». Пожалуйста, обещай мне быть осторожной.

143

— Ну, разумеется, — ответила Нэнси. Обращаясь к отцу, она сказала: — Сделаем вид, что я тебе сказала то же самое: будь осторожнее!

144

Отец ухмыльнулся и ударил себя в грудь.

— Ты меня знаешь. Когда надо, я могу за себя постоять.

145

На следующий день рано утром Нэнси отвезла отца в аэропорт на своей синей машине с откидным верхом. Перед тем, как она на прощание поцеловала его возле турникета, он сказал:

— Нэнси, я рассчитываю вернуться в среду. Что, если я заеду в Клифвуд и поинтересуюсь твоими успехами?

146

— Замечательно, папа! Буду тебя ждать.

147

Как только отец улетел, Нэнси поехала к Эллен Корнинг. Из белого коттеджа вышла, помахивая чемоданчиком, хорошенькая молодая брюнетка. Забросив чемодан на заднее сиденье машины, она забралась в неё сама и села рядом с Нэнси.

148

— Мне бы надо испытывать страх, — сказала Эллен. — Один Бог знает, что нас ждёт. Но в данный момент я так счастлива, что меня ничто огорчить не может.

149

— Что случилось? — спросила Нэнси, включая стартер. — Получила миллион в наследство?

150

— Кое-что получше, — ответила Эллен. — Нэнси, я хочу открыть тебе большой, очень большой секрет. Я выхожу замуж!

151

Нэнси сбавила скорость и отъехала в сторону с проезжей части. Перегнувшись, чтобы обнять подругу, она воскликнула:

— Ах, Эллен, до чего же это замечательно! Кто он? Расскажи мне все. Это как-то неожиданно произошло, не так ли?

152

— Да, неожиданно, — призналась Эллен. — Его зовут Джим Арчер, и он просто неземное существо. Можно считать, мне повезло. Я познакомилась с ним всего месяца два назад, когда он приезжал домой на короткие каникулы. Он работает в нефтяной компании «Тристам ойл» и два года провёл за границей. Джим пробудет за границей ещё некоторое время, а потом получит назначение на какую-то должность здесь, в Соединённых Штатах.

153

Вновь трогая машину, Нэнси посмотрела на подругу лукаво поблёскивавшими глазами.

— Эллен Корнинг, значит, вы были уже два месяца как помолвлены и ничего мне не сказали об этом? Эллен помотала головой.

154

— Мы с Джимом всё время переписывались. Вчера вечером он позвонил мне из-за границы и сделал предложение. — Эллен захихикала. — Я с большой поспешностью сказала «да». Тогда он сказал, что хочет поговорить с папой. Отец дал согласие, но настоял на том, чтобы о нашем обручении не сообщалось, пока Джим не вернётся на родину.

155

Девушки углубились в обсуждение всевозможных восхитительных планов свадьбы Эллен и не успели заметить, как прибыли в город Клифвуд.

156

— Поместье моей прабабушки находится милях в двух от города, — сказала Эллен. — Поезжай по главной улице и у развилки поверни направо.

157

Десять минут спустя она указала особняк «Два вяза». С дороги дом был почти не виден. Перед фасадом тянулась высокая каменная стена, а позади дома росло множество высоких деревьев. Нэнси свернула на подъездную дорожку, которая вилась посреди вязов, дубов и кленов.

158

Наконец их взорам предстал старый дом, построенный ещё в колониальную эпоху. Эллен сказала, что он был сооружён в 1785 году и получил своё наименование потому, что по обеим сторонам длинного здания стояли два вяза. Они вымахали в настоящих гигантов с очень красивой кроной. Дом был сложен из красного кирпича, и почти все его стены были увиты плющом. К огромной парадной двери вело крыльцо высотою десять футов со стройными белыми колоннами.

159

— Дом просто очарователен! — восхитилась Нэнси, взобравшись на крыльцо.

160

— Погоди, ты ещё не видела окружающую территорию, — сказала Эллен. — На ней находятся несколько старых-старых зданий. Ледник, коптильня, кухня и коттеджи слуг.

161

— Надо прямо сказать, что снаружи в особняке нет ничего, напоминающего о привидениях и тому подобной чертовщине, — заметила Нэнси,

162

В этот момент отворилась большая дверь, и навстречу им вышла тётя Розмари.

— Здравствуйте, девушки, — приветствовала она их - Я рада вас видеть.

163

Нэнси ощутила искреннюю теплоту приветствия, но сквозь него чувствовалась нотка тревоги. «Уж не произошёл ли в особняке какой-нибудь новый инцидент с участием призрака?» — подумала она.

164

Девушки вытащили из машины свои чемоданы и направились вслед за миссис Хэйз в дом. Хотя обстановка была довольно обшарпанная, она всё ещё была красива. Из центрального холла открывался вид на комнаты с высокими потолками, и при самом беглом взгляде Нэнси успела заметить красивые дамастовые занавески, обитые атласом диваны и кресла, а на стенах — фамильные портреты в больших золочёных рамах, украшенных разными завитушками.

165

Тётя Розмари подошла к подножию лестницы, покрытой ветхим ковром, взялась рукой за красивые перила красного дерева и крикнула:

— Мама, девушки прибыли!

166

В ту же минуту по лестнице начала спускаться стройная, хрупкая на вид женщина с белыми как снег волосами. Её лицо, хотя оно и было более старым, чем лицо Розмари, было освещено тою же мягкой улыбкой. Дойдя до подножия лестницы, мисс Флора протянула обеим девушкам руку.

167

Эллен тут же произнесла:

— Мисс Флора, мне бы хотелось вам представить Нэнси Дру.

168

— Я так рада, что вы смогли приехать, дорогая, — сказала старая женщина. — Я знаю, что вы разрешите эту загадку, которая не даёт покоя ни мне, ни Розмари. Я сожалею, что не могу доставить вам более приятных развлечений, но дом, преследуемый призраками, вряд ли располагает к веселью.

169

Изящная и статная мисс Флора стремительно направилась в комнату, которую она назвала гостиной. Комната находилась напротив библиотеки. Она уселась в кресло с высокой спинкой и пригласила всех усаживаться.

170

— Мама, — сказала тётя Розмари, — с Нэнси и Эллен мы можем не соблюдать церемоний. Я уверена, они поймут, что мы были только что сильно напуганы. — Она повернулась к девушкам. — Некоторое время тому назад случилось кое-что, что заставило нас сильно разнервничаться.

171

— Да, — сказала мисс Флора. — Украдено моё жемчужное ожерелье!

172

— Неужели вы имеете в виду ту изумительную вещицу, которая столько лет хранилась в семье? — воскликнула Эллен.

173

Обе женщины утвердительно кивнули. Потом мисс Флора сказала:

— О, я, наверное, совершила страшную глупость. Я сама виновата. Находясь в комнате, я вынула ожерелье из тайника, где обычно его держу. В последний раз, когда я его надевала, застёжка плохо работала, и я хотела посмотреть, что с ней случилось. В этот момент Розмари попросила меня спуститься вниз: пришёл садовник, и ему надо было о чём-то со мной поговорить. Я положила ожерелье в ящик туалетного столика. Когда я вернулась через десять минут, ожерелья там не оказалось!

174

— Какой ужас! — сочувственно воскликнула Нэнси. — Кто-нибудь заходил в дом за это время?

175

— Насколько нам известно, никто, — ответила тётя Розмари. — С тех пор как нас стал навещать этот призрак, мы всё время держим на запоре все двери и окна на первом этаже.

176

Нэнси спросила, выходили ли обе хозяйки в сад, чтобы поговорить с садовником.

— Мама выходила, — ответила миссис Хэйз. — Но я всё время оставалась в кухне. Если бы кто-нибудь вошёл через чёрный ход, я обязательно бы увидела.

177

— А существует чёрная лестница на второй этаж? — поинтересовалась Нэнси,

178

. — Да, — ответила мисс Флора. — Но и внизу и наверху имеются двери, и мы держим их на замке. Этим путём в дом никто проникнуть не мог.

179

— Значит, всякий, кто вошёл в дом, должен был подняться по парадной лестнице?

180

— Да. — Тётя Розмари слегка улыбнулась. — Но если бы кто-то вошёл, я бы его увидела. Когда мама сходила вниз, вы, вероятно, слышали, как скрипят ступени лестницы. Этого можно избежать, если держаться ближе к стене, но этого фактически никто не знает.

181

— Можно мне подняться наверх и посмотреть, что там и как? — спросила Нэнси.

182

— Ну, конечно, дорогая. Заодно я покажу тебе и Эллен вашу комнату, — сказала тётя Розмари.

183

Девушки взяли свои чемоданы и пошли следом за двумя женщинами вверх по лестнице. Нэнси и Эллен отвели большую оригинальной формы комнату в фасадной части старинного дома, над библиотекой. Они быстро освободились от своего багажа, после чего мисс Флора повела их через холл в свою комнату, находившуюся над гостиной. Комната была большая и очень красивая, с её кроватью красного дерева под балдахином и старомодным покрывалом, вышитым «фитильками». Комод, туалетный столик и кресла тоже были красного дерева. На окнах висели длинные ситцевые занавески.

184

Нэнси начало овладевать какое-то странное чувство. Она почти ощущала присутствие на территории поместья «призрачного» грабителя. И сколько она ни пыталась стряхнуть с себя это ощущение, оно не проходило. Наконец она сказала себе, что вор, возможно, находится ещё где-то поблизости. Если так, он наверняка прячется.

185

Около одной из стен стоял большой платяной шкаф орехового дерева. Эллен заметила, что Нэнси внимательно на него смотрит. Она подошла к ней и прошептала:

— Ты думаешь, внутри, может быть, кто-нибудь есть?

186

— Кто знает, — тихо ответила Нэнси. — Давай выясним! Она пересекла комнату и, взявшись за круглые ручки на створчатых дверцах шкафа, широко распахнула их.

187

СТРАННАЯ МУЗЫКА

188

Взволнованные женщины стали заглядывать в шкаф. Никого там не оказалось. Только платья, костюмы и пальто висели в строгом порядке.

189

Нэнси шагнула вперёд и начала смотреть между платьями: ведь кто-то мог скрываться позади одежды. Пока она производила самый тщательный обыск, остальные следили за ней, затаив дыхание.

190

— Здесь никого нет! — наконец воскликнула она; мисс Флора и тётя Розмари облегчённо вздохнули.

191

Юная сыщица заявила, что она намерена произвести тщательные поиски во всех потаённых местечках на втором этаже. Вместе с Эллен, которая помогала ей, они переходили из комнаты в комнату, открывали дверцы шкафов, заглядывали под кровати. Вора они не нашли.

192

Нэнси посоветовала, чтобы мисс Флора и тётя Розмари сообщили о краже в полицию, но старшая из двух женщин покачала отрицательно головой. Миссис Хэйз, хотя и соглашавшаяся с тем, что это был правильный шаг, мягко добавила;

— Возможно, мама всё-таки ошибается. Она иногда забывает, куда положила ту или иную вещь.

193

Имея в виду такую возможность, она вместе с девушками заглянула в каждый ящичек в комнате; они посмотрели под матрацами и подушками и даже в карманах платьев и халатов мисс Флоры. Жемчужное ожерелье найдено не было. Нэнси сказала, что они с Эллен попробуют установить, каким образом вор проник в дом. Эллен повела её на улицу. Нэнси сразу же начала искать следы. Ни возле парадного, ни около заднего крыльца, ни на одной из дорожек, посыпанных каменной крошкой, никаких следов видно не было.

194

— Давай посмотрим на мягкой почве под окнами, — сказала Нэнси. — Может быть, вор забрался снаружи, через окно.

195

— Но ведь тётя Розмари сказала, что все окна на первом этаже заперты, — возразила Эллен.

196

— Конечно, — согласилась Нэнси. — И всё-таки я думаю, что поискать следы мы должны.

197

Девушки переходили от окна к окну, но ни под одним из них никаких следов не было. Наконец Нэнси остановилась и задумчиво посмотрела на плющ, вьющийся по стенам.

198

— Ты думаешь, вор мог взобраться на второй этаж таким образом? — спросила её Эллен. — Но ведь в таком случае на земле все равно остались бы следы.

199

Нэнси сказала, что у вора могла быть с собой дощечка, которую он мог положить на землю и, таким образом, перебраться с дорожки на стену дома. А там он мог взобраться наверх, хватаясь за плющ, таким же образом спуститься и вернуться на дорожку, не оставив никаких следов.

200

Нэнси снова обошла весь дом, разглядывая плющ, который начинал виться от самой земли. Наконец она сказала:

— Нет, этим путём вор не воспользовался.

201

— Но ведь всё-таки не влетел же он в дом, — сказала Эллен. — Каким же образом он проник внутрь? Нэнси засмеялась.

Если бы я могла ответить тебе на этот вопрос, это означало бы, что тайна наполовину разгадана.

202

Нэнси сказала, что ей хотелось бы оглядеть местность вокруг «Двух вязов».

Это может дать нам ключ к тому, каким образом вор проник в дом.

203

Пока они шли, Нэнси зорко смотрела по сторонам, но ничего подозрительного не заметила. Наконец они подошли к полуразвалившейся дорожке, выложенной затейливым перекрещивающимся узором из кирпича.

204

— Куда ведёт эта дорожка? — спросила Нэнси.

205

— Я думаю, что когда-то она вела к соседнему особняку, который называется «Речной пейзаж», — ответила Эллен. — Этот дом я тебе покажу позже. Первый владелец был братом того, который выстроил наш особняк.

206

Далее Эллен сообщила, что особняк «Речной пейзаж» был точной копией «Двух вязов». Братья были неразлучными друзьями, но их сыновья, жившие в этих домах после них, страшно поссорились и стали на всю жизнь врагами.

207

— Особняк «Речной пейзаж» не раз продавался, но он давно уже пустует,

208

— Ты хочешь сказать, сейчас там никто не живёт? — спросила Нэнси. Когда Эллен утвердительно кивнула, она со смехом сказала:

209

— Так, может, это и есть обиталище призрака?

— В таком случае он действительно должен быть призраком, — небрежно заметила Эллен. — В доме нет абсолютно никакой мебели.

210

Девушки вернулись домой и сообщили, что их попытки отыскать след незваного гостя не увенчались успехом. Вспомнив, что многие дома колониальной эпохи имеют потайные входы и переходы, Нэнси обратилась к мисс Флоре:

— Известен ли вам какой-нибудь секретный вход в ваш дом, которым вор мог бы воспользоваться?

211

Она ответила отрицательно, добавив, что её муж был человек молчаливый и скончался он, когда Розмари была ещё крошечным ребёнком.

— Вполне возможно, он знал о тайном входе, но не хотел волновать меня рассказом о нём, — сказала миссис Тернбулл.

212

Тётя Розмари, почувствовав, что вопросы начинают вызывать у её матери тревогу, предложила устроить ленч. Обе девушки отправились вместе с ней на кухню и помогли приготовить вкусную еду. салат с курицей, бисквиты и фруктовое желе.

213

Во время еды разговор касался различных тем, но неизменно возвращался к тайне призрака. Они только кончили есть, как Нэнси вдруг резко выпрямилась в кресле. — В чём дело? — спросила её Эллен.

214

Нэнси смотрела через дверь столовой на лестницу в холле. Потом она повернулась к мисс Флоре.

— Вы оставили радиоприёмник в вашей комнате включённым?

215

— Нет, а что?

— А вы, тётя Розмари?

216

— Нет. Ни мама, ни я сегодня утром вообще не включали наши приёмники. А почему… — Она не закончила свой вопрос, потому что теперь все они отчётливо слышали музыку, доносившуюся со второго этажа.

217

Эллен и Нэнси мигом вскочили с места, бросились в холл, а оттуда — вверх по лестнице. Музыка доносилась из комнаты мисс Флоры, и, когда они ворвались туда, они убедились, что звучала она из её радиоприёмника.

218

Нэнси подошла, чтобы осмотреть приёмник. Это был аппарат старого образца, не снабжённый устройством для автоматического включения и выключения.

219

— Кто-то вошёл в эту комнату и включил радио! — заявила она.

220

На лице Эллен появилась тревога, но она попыталась избавиться от своей нервозности и спросила:

— Нэнси, а ты не считаешь, что приёмник мог быть включён с помощью дистанционного управления? Я слыхала о таких вещах.

221

Нэнси сказала, что она в этом сомневается.

— Боюсь, Эллен, что вор всё время находился и находится в доме. Он и призрак — одно и то же лицо. Как жалко, что мы раньше не заглянули в погреб и на чердак. Но, может, ещё не поздно. Пошли!

222

Вместо того чтобы выйти из комнаты, Эллен стояла, пристально глядя на камин.

— Нэнси, ты не думаешь, что кто-нибудь прячется там?

223

Без колебаний она пересекла комнату, стала на колени и попыталась заглянуть в трубу. Вьюшка была закрыта. Протянув руку, Эллен дёрнула её, пытаясь открыть.

224

— Ох ты! — вскрикнула она.

225

— О Эллен, бедняжка! — воскликнула Нэнси, подбегая к подруге.

226

Вниз обрушился дождь сажи, покрыв волосы, лицо, плечи и руки Эллен.

227

— Нэнси, пожалуйста, принеси мне полотенце.

228

Нэнси бросилась в ванную и схватила два больших полотенца. Она обмотала ими подругу, а потом пошла вместе с Эллен помочь ей вымыть голову и вообще отмыться от грязи. После этого она принесла ей чистое спортивное платье.

229

— Боюсь, моя идея насчёт труб оказалась не слишком удачной, — грустно констатировала Эллен. — И теперь, наверное, мы уже упустили время поймать вора,

230

Тем не менее они с Нэнси взобрались на чердак и пошарили между чемоданами и всевозможными ящиками — не прячется ли там кто-нибудь. После этого девушки спустились в погреб и осмотрели различные помещения там. Но никакого следа вора, проникшего в особняк, они так и не обнаружили.

231

Когда мисс Флора выслушала всю историю, она нервно вздохнула.

— Это — призрак. Никакого другого объяснения нет.

232

— Но почему призрак вдруг стал выкидывать свои штуки именно здесь? — спросила тётя Розмари. — В этом доме люди жили с 1785 года, и никогда ни о каком призраке здесь не слыхивали.

233

— По-видимому, цель его появления — грабёж, — сказала Нэнси. — Но зачем вору понадобилось вас пугать — этого я пока ещё не понимаю.

234

— Самое главное, — сказала Эллен, — это поймать его.

235

— О, если бы это было возможно! — дрожащим голосом произнесла мисс Флора.

236

Девушки собирались убрать со стола грязные тарелки и отнести их в кухню, когда во входную дверь громко постучали.

237

— О, Господи, кто это может быть? Вдруг это вор, явившийся напакостить нам всем?! — воскликнула мисс Флора. Тётя Розмари обняла мать одной рукой за плечи.

238

— Пожалуйста, не волнуйся, — умоляющим голосом сказала она. — Я думаю, что наш гость — это, вероятно, человек, желающий купить «Два вяза». — Она повернулась к Нэнси и Эллен. — Но мама не хочет продавать за ту низкую цену, которую он предлагает.

239

Нэнси сказала, что она пойдёт открывать. Она поставила релки на стол и вышла в холл. Подойдя к парадной двери, она широко её распахнула.

На пороге стоял Натан Гомбер!

240

СТРАННАЯ БЕСЕДА

241

В течение нескольких секунд Натан Гомбер смотрел на Нэнси, не веря глазам своим.

— Вы! — наконец воскликнул он.

242

— Вы не ожидали встретить меня здесь, как я понимаю, — холодно сказала девушка.

243

— Разумеется, не ожидал. Я думал, вы прислушаетесь к моему совету и останетесь вместе с отцом. Но сегодняшние молодые люди мягкосердечием не отличаются! — Гомбер возмущённо качал головой.

244

Нэнси не обратила на его замечание ни малейшего внимания. Пожав плечами, посетитель тяжёлой походкой двинулся в холл.

— Я знаю. Если что-нибудь случится с вашим отцом, вы себе этого никогда не простите. Но Натана Гомбера вам за это винить не придётся. Я вас предупреждал!

245

Нэнси по-прежнему молчала. Она продолжала пристально смотреть на него, пытаясь сообразить, что у него действительно на уме. В том, что он меньше всего заботился о её отце, она не сомневалась.

246

Натан Гомбер резко изменил тему разговора.

247

— Я хотел бы повидать миссис Тернбулл и миссис Хэйз, — сказал он. — Пойдите и позовите их.

248

Нэнси была раздосадована грубостью Гомбера, но всё же повернулась и направилась через холл в столовую.

249

— Мы слышали каждое слово, — шёпотом сказала ей мисс Флора. — Я не приму мистера Гомбера. У меня нет желания продавать этот дом.

250

Нэнси выслушала это с удивлением,

— Вы хотите сказать, что это он человек, желающий купить дом?

— Да.

251

Нэнси сразу же насторожилась. Учитывая характер сделки с железной дорогой, в которой был замешан Натан Гомбер, она не верила в честность мотивов, по которым он желал купить «Два вяза». В голове её пронеслась мысль: быть может, он пытается купить это поместье по очень низкой цене, с тем чтобы потом распродать его отдельными участками под строительство и получить таким образом огромную прибыль.

252

— Хотите, я пойду и скажу ему, что вы не желаете продавать? — тихо предложила Нэнси. Но её предосторожность оказалась излишней. Услышав за своей спиной шаги, она повернулась и увидела, что Гомбер уже стоит в дверях.

253

— Привет всем! — сказал он.

254

Мисс Флора, тётя Розмари и Эллен не скрыли своей досады. Все они явно считали, что у этого человека необыкновенно скверные манеры.

255

Тётя Розмари упрямо сжала челюсти, но всё же сказала вежливо:

— Эллен, это мистер Гомбер. Мистер Гомбер это моя племянница, мисс Корнинг.

256

— Рад с вами познакомиться, — сказал гость, протягивая руку для рукопожатия.

257

— Нэнси, ты, по-моему, знакома с мистером Гомбером, — продолжала тётя Розмари.

258

— Ну как же! — откликнулся Натан Гомбер, хрипло рассмеявшись. — Мы с Нэнси уже встречались!

259

— Только однажды, — многозначительно подчеркнула девушка.

260

Не обратив на это внимания, он продолжал:

— Нэнси Дру — весьма странная барышня. Её отцу грозит серьёзная опасность, и я пытался её предостеречь, чтобы она от него не отходила. Вместо этого пожалуйста, она здесь — в гостях у вас.

261

— Её отцу грозит опасность? — встревожено спросила мисс Флора.

262

— Папа говорит, что нет, — ответила Нэнси. — И кроме того, я убеждена, что папа сумеет справиться с любыми врагами. — Она посмотрела прямо в лицо Натану Гомберу, как бы желая дать ему понять, что членов семейства Дру не так-то легко запугать.

263

— Ну что ж, — сказал посетитель. — Перейдём к делу. — Он вытащил из кармана конверт, набитый бумагами. — Все здесь готово, миссис Тернбулл, вам остаётся только подписать.

264

— Я не желаю продавать по такой низкой цене, — твёрдо заявила ему мисс Флора. — Собственно говоря, я вообще не уверена, что хочу продать дом.

265

Натан Гомбер потряс головой.

— Продадите как миленькая, — предсказал он. — Я беседовал кое с кем в центре города. Все знают, что этот старый дом посещают призраки, и никто вам за него пяти центов не даст. То есть никто, кроме меня.

266

Пока он выжидал, чтобы смысл его слов дошёл до сознания собеседниц, Нэнси спросила:

— Если дом посещают призраки, почему же вы хотите его купить?

267

— Ну, — ответил Гомбер, — дело, наверное, в том, что я по натуре игрок. Я готов вложить в этот дом кое-какие средства, даже если тут и разгуливает призрак. — Он громко рассмеялся и продолжал: — Я утверждаю, что можно получить истинное удовольствие от того, чтобы, встретившись с призраком, одержать над ним верх.

268

Нэнси с отвращением думала про себя: «Натан Гомбер, вы, пожалуй, самый противный и самодовольный человек, какого мне приходилось за последнее время видеть».

269

Внезапно хитрое выражение лица Гомбера резко изменилось. В глазах его появилось почти мечтательное выражение. Он сел в одно из кресел столовой и подпёр подбородок рукой.

270

— Вы, небось, думаете, что я просто жестокосердный делец, не знающий, что такое чувства, — сказал он. — На самом деле я очень мягок. Я скажу вам, почему мне так сильно хочется завладеть этим старым домом. Я всегда мечтал стать хозяином особняка в колониальном стиле и таким образом породниться со старой Америкой. Понимаете, мои родители были в Европе бедняками. Теперь, когда я скопил немного денег, мне бы хотелось иметь такой дом, как этот, где можно было бы бродить по комнатам и наслаждаться ощущением традиций, связанных с ним.

271

Мисс Флору слова Гомбера, как видно, тронули.

Я не имела понятия о том, что вам так сильно хочется приобрести этот дом, — мягко сказала она. — Возможно, мне следовало бы от него отказаться. Для нас он, по правде говоря, слишком велик.

272

Видя, что её мать сдаёт позиции, тётя Розмари быстро сказала:

— Мама, тебе вовсе не обязательно продавать этот дом. Ты сама знаешь, что любишь его. Что же касается призрака, то я уверена, что эта тайна будет разгадана. И тогда ты пожалеешь, что рассталась с «Двумя вязами». Пожалуйста, не соглашайся!

273

Гомбер посмотрел на миссис Хэйз мрачным взглядом, а Нэнси спросила:

— Почему вы не покупаете «Речной пейзаж»? Он — точная копия этого особняка, и он продаётся. Вы, вероятно, могли бы купить его по более низкой цене, чем этот особняк.

274

— Я видел тот дом, — ответил Гомбер, — Он в скверном состоянии. Привести его в порядок обойдётся мне в копеечку. Нет уж, спасибо! Я хочу этот дом, и я его получу!

275

Это смелое замечание даже тёте Розмари показалось слишком наглым. Со сверкающими глазами она заявила:

— Мистер Гомбер, наша беседа окончена. Всего хорошего!

276

К восторгу и к некоторой потехе Нэнси, Натан Гомбер повиновался этому «приказу» удалиться. Когда он проходил через холл и потом выходил из парадного, вид у него был почти что смиренный.

277

— Нет, какая наглость! — взорвалась Эллен.

278

— Может, нам не следует слишком строго судить этого человека, — робко проговорила мисс Флора. — Он рассказал трогательную историю, и я могу себе представить, как ему хочется делать перед самим собой вид, будто он имеет давние семейные корни в Америке.

279

— Готова спорить на что угодно, что мистер Гомбер не сказал ни одного слова правды, — заметила Эллен.

280

— О Господи, я совсем сбита с толку, — сказала дрожащим голосом мисс Флора. — Давайте посидим все в гостиной и побеседуем об этом ещё немного.

281

Две девушки отступили немножко назад, пропуская из дверей столовой сначала мисс Флору, а затем тётю Розмари. Они перешли в гостиную, где уселись все вместе на диван, стоявший в небольшой нише возле камина. Повинуясь внезапному наитию, Нэнси подбежала к окну, чтобы посмотреть, в какую сторону пошёл Гомбер. К её удивлению, он шагал по петляющей подъездной дорожке.

282

— Странно. Очевидно, он не на машине приехал, — сказала себе Нэнси. — Чтобы добраться до города и сесть на поезд или в автобус до Ривер-Хайтс, надо пройти весьма солидное расстояние.

283

Пока Нэнси размышляла над этой идеей, отыскивая ответ на свой вопрос, она услышала какие-то скрипящие звуки. Эллен внезапно пронзительно вскрикнула. Нэнси быстро повернулась.

284

— Посмотрите! — крикнула Эллен, указывая на потолок, и все посмотрели наверх.

285

Хрустальная люстра внезапно начала раскачиваться из стороны в сторону!

286

— Опять призрак! — вскричала мисс Флора. У неё был такой вид, словно она вот-вот упадёт в обморок.

287

Нэнси быстро окинула взглядом комнату. Ничто больше в ней не двигалось, так что нельзя было подумать, что люстра начала двигаться под влиянием вибрации. Пока она раскачивалась из стороны в сторону, в голову юной сыщицы пришла одна мысль. Может быть, эти колебания вызывает кто-то, находящийся в комнате мисс Флоры.

288

— Пойду наверх, выясню, что происходит, — сказала Нэнси, обращаясь к остальным.

289

Бесшумно выскочив на цыпочках из комнаты и пробежав через холл, она начала подниматься по лестнице, прижимаясь к стене, чтобы ступеньки не скрипели. Когда она дошла уже почти до самого верха, она ясно услышала звук захлопнувшейся двери. Торопливо пройдя через холл, она ворвалась в спальню мисс Флоры. Никого там не было.

290

«Может, на этот раз призрак не смог уйти и находится в этом шкафу», — подумала Нэнси.

291

Эллен и её родственницы поднялись по лестнице вслед за Нэнси. Они вошли в спальню в тот самый момент, когда она распахнула дверцы шкафа. Но и на этот раз она никого там не обнаружила.

292

Нэнси с досадой закусила губы. Призрак был поистине очень ловок. Ну куда он подевался? Она не оставила ему времени пройти через холл или перебежать в другую комнату. Тем не менее невозможно было отрицать, что он побывал в комнате мисс Флоры!

293

— Расскажи нам, почему ты пошла наверх, — попросила Эллен. Нэнси изложила свою теорию, но вдруг она поняла, что, быть может, позволила слишком разгуляться своей фантазии. Вполне возможно, призналась она, что качания люстры не были кем-то вызваны.

294

— Есть только один способ это выяснить, — сказала онэ. — Я проведу опыт.

295

Нэнси попросила Эллен вернуться на первый этаж и понаблюдать за люстрой. Она попытается заставить её раскачиваться, переступая с ноги на ногу по полу прямо над ней.

296

— Если получится, то я уверена, что мы нашли ключ к загадке призрака, — сказала она с надеждой.

297

Эллен охотно согласилась и вышла из комнаты. Когда Нэнси решила, что её подруга успела добраться до гостиной этажом ниже, она стала с силой переступать с ноги на ногу на том месте, где внизу была укреплена люстра.

298

Не успела она начать опыт, как с первого этажа раздался пронзительный крик Эллен Корнинг.

299

МОРДА ГОРИЛЛЫ

300

— С Эллен что-то случилось, испуганно крикнула тётя Розмари.

301

Нэнси уже неслась через холл второго этажа. Достигнув лестницы, она побежала вниз, перескакивая через две ступеньки. Эллен Корнинг свалилась без сил в кресле в гостиной, закрыв лицо руками.

302

— Эллен, что случилось? — спросила Нэнси, подбегая к подруге.

303

— Вон там! Заглядывает в окно! — Эллен указала на окно в гостиной по соседству с холлом. — Я никогда не видела более ужасного лица!

304

— Лицо было мужское? — спросила Нэнси.

305

— Ах, я не знаю. Больше всего оно походило на гориллу! — Эллен закрыла глаза, как бы стараясь изгнать воспоминание об ужасном зрелище.

306

Нэнси не стала дожидаться подробностей. Уже через секунду она была у парадной двери и распахнула её. Выйдя наружу, она огляделась вокруг. Возле дома никакого животного она не увидела, так же как не нашла и никаких следов того, что кто-то стоял под окном.

307

Озадаченная юная сыщица торопливо спустилась по ступеням и начала тщательно осматривать прилегающую территорию. К этому времени Эллен овладела собой и тоже вышла из дома. Она присоединилась к Нэнси, и они сообща заглянули в каждую надворную постройку и за каждый куст, росший на земле «Двух вязов». Они не нашли ни единого следа или каких-либо других улик, говоривших о том, что на территории поместья побывала горилла или какое-либо другое животное.

308

— Я его видела! Я твёрдо знаю, что видела его, — настаивала Эллен.

309

— Я ничуть не сомневаюсь, — отозвалась Нэнси.

310

— Тогда как это можно объяснить? — спросила Эллен. — о Ты знаешь, что я никогда в привидения не верила. Но если у нас здесь произойдут новые события такого рода, я заявляю, что начну верить в призраков.

311

Нэнси засмеялась.

— Не волнуйся, Эллен. Для появления в окне этой физиономии найдётся логическое объяснение.

312

Девушки пошли назад, к входной двери в дом. Там стояли мисс Флора и тётя Розмари, которые тут же стали расспрашивать, что случилось. Пока Эллен им рассказывала,

Нэнси ещё раз оглядела внешний подход к окну, в котором Эллен увидела страшное лицо.

313

— У меня есть теория, — сказала она. — Наш призрак просто перегнулся с края крыльца и вытянул перед окном маску. — Нэнси протянула руку, чтобы показать, как это можно было сделать.

314

— Так вот почему он не оставил никаких следов под окном — сказала Эллен. — Но надо сказать, он чрезвычайно быстро отсюда убрался. — Она внезапно рассмеялась. — Наверняка он участвует в команде призраков-бегунов.

315

Нэнси с радостью убедилась, что её юмористическое отношение к происшедшему разрядило обстановку. Она заметила, как мисс Флора устало опёрлась о руку своей дочери.

316

— Тебе бы следовало лечь и отдохнуть, мама, — посоветовала миссис Хэйз.

317

— Пожалуй, я так и сделаю, — согласилась мисс Флора.

318

Было решено, что старая женщина устроится в комнате тёти Розмари, а остальные продолжат эксперимент с люстрой.

319

Эллен и тётя Розмари направились в гостиную и стали ждать, пока Нэнси поднимется по лестнице и войдёт в спальню мисс Флоры. Она снова начала раскачиваться из стороны в сторону. Внизу тётя Розмари и её племянница внимательно смотрели на потолок.

320

— Смотрите-ка! — воскликнула Эллен, указывая на люстру. — Она двигается! — На какое-то мгновение люстра качнулась влево, потом снова направо.

321

— Нэнси доказала, что призрак побывал в комнате моей мамы! — возбуждённо воскликнула тётя Розмари.

322

Через несколько минут качания люстры стали слабее и наконец прекратились Нэнси торопливо спустилась с лестницы.

323

— Ну как, подействовало? — спросила она.

324

— Да, ещё как! — ответила тётя Розмари. — О Нэнси, у нас наверняка целых два призрака.

325

— Почему вы так считаете? — спросила Эллен.

326

— Один раскачивал люстру, а другой держал маску перед окном. Никто не мог так быстро переместиться из комнаты мисс Флоры на крыльцо. Ах, это все усложняет!

327

— Да, конечно, — согласилась Нэнси. — Вопрос заключается в следующем. Состоят ли оба призрака в сговоре? Или всё-таки действует только один призрак. Он мог незаметно для нас проскочить из комнаты мисс Флоры на первый этаж и выйти из парадного, пока мы были наверху. Я убеждена, что существует по меньшей мере один, а может быть, и больше секретных ходов в этот дом. Думаю, что нашим следующим шагом должно быть найти один или оба входа.

328

— Сначала надо, пожалуй, вымыть грязную посуду, оставшуюся после ленча, — заметила тётя Розмари.

329

Работая, они обсуждали загадочную ситуацию, и миссис Хэйз сообщила, что она говорила с матерью о том, чтобы покинуть дом, независимо от того, продаст ли она его или нет.

330

— Я полагаю, что мы могли бы уехать ненадолго отдохнуть, однако мама отказывается уезжать. Она говорит, что намерена оставаться здесь, пока история с призраком не прояснится.

331

Эллен улыбнулась.

— Нэнси, моя прабабушка — замечательная женщина. Она не раз показывала мне пример мужества и стойкости. Надеюсь, что если я доживу до её возраста, я буду обладать хотя бы половиной этих её качеств.

332

— Да, она — пример для всех нас, — подтвердила тётя Розмари.

333

Нэнси кивнула.

— Совершенно с вами согласна. Я совсем недавно познакомилась с вашей мамой, тётя Розмари, но я считаю её одним из самых лучших людей, каких я встречала в жизни.

334

— Раз мисс Флора отсюда не уедет, — заметила Эллен, — я полагаю, это означает, что мы все остаёмся.

335

— Вопрос решён, — с улыбкой сказала Нэнси. Убрав посуду, девушки были готовы начать поиски потайного входа в особняк.

336

— Давайте начнём с комнаты мисс Флоры, — предложила Эллен.

337

— Что ж, вполне логично, — согласилась Нэнси и первой зашагала вверх по лестнице.

338

Стены комнаты были обшиты панелями из кленового дерева, тянувшимися от пола до середины стены. Они простукали их дюйм за дюймом и ни разу не уловили глухого звука, который указывал бы на то, что позади пустое пространство. Бюро, туалетный столик и кровать отодвинули от стен, и Нэнси тщательно осмотрела панели — нет ли где трещин или широких швов, могущих указывать на то, что за ними скрывается дверь.

339

— Пока ничего, — объявила она и затем решила обследовать стены по обе стороны от камина.

340

Ни обшитые панелями участки, ни передняя часть камина, сложенная из камня, не показали ничего. После этого Нэнси заглянула внутрь камина, оглядев его стенки и каменное нутро. Ничего необычного она не увидела, а почерневшие камни, судя по всему, никто никогда не сдвигал в сторону.

341

Она закрыла заслонку, которую Эллен оставила открытой, а затем предложила продолжить поиски в другой комнате на втором этаже. Однако и там не удалось найти никаких следов потайного входа в дом.

342

— По-моему, на сегодня поисков достаточно, — заметила тётя Розмари.

343

Нэнси собиралась сказать, что она не устала и хотела бы продолжать, но она поняла, что замечание миссис Хэйз было вызвано тем, что её мама снова начала проявлять признаки слабости и нервозности.

344

Эллен, также сумевшая правильно оценить ситуацию, сказала:

— Давайте поужинаем пораньше. Я умираю с голоду!

345

— Я тоже, — с весёлым смехом поддержала её Нэнси.

346

Настроение оказалось заразительным, и вскоре мисс флора как будто забыла о том, что её дом преследуют призраки. Она сидела в кухне, пока тётя Розмари и девушки готовили ужин.

347

— Значит, так: бифштекс с жареной картошкой, зелёный горошек и десерт со взбитыми сливками, — сказала Эллен. — По-моему, замечательно!

348

— Сначала по чашечке фруктового сока, — объявила тётя Розмари, доставая из холодильника сосуд с фруктовым соком.

349

Вскоре все сидели за столом. Тактично стараясь отвести разговор подальше от тайны призрака, Нэнси попросила мисс Флору рассказать им о приёмах и балах, которые устраивались в этом доме в старину.

350

Старая женщина, улыбаясь, предалась воспоминаниям.

— Мне вспоминается одна история, которую мне рассказал мой муж. Она произошла, когда он был ещё ребёнком. Его родители устроили бал-маскарад, и предполагалось, что он в это время будет крепко спать у себя в постельке. Нянька его спустилась вниз покалякать с другими слугами. Мальчика разбудила музыка, и он решил, что было бы очень интересно присоединиться к гостям.

351

— «Я тоже надену костюм», — решил он. Он знал, что в одном из сундуков на чердаке хранятся всевозможные костюмы. — Мисс Флора на минутку умолкла. — Кстати, девушки, — продолжала она, — я думаю, что, пока вы здесь, вам надо будет как-нибудь выбрать время посмотреть на них. Они очень красивы.

352

— Ну так вот, Эверетт залез на чердак, открыл сундук и начал в нём рыться, пока не нашёл военную форму. Она была весьма затейливого вида — красный мундир и белые штаны. Ему пришлось немало потрудиться, чтобы облачиться в костюм, а рукава на мундире пришлось подвернуть. Бриджи, которые должны были доходить до колен, спускались у него до самых лодыжек, а шляпа была так велика, что закрывала ему уши.

353

Слушательницы мисс Флоры смеялись, а тётя Розмари заметила:

— Наверное, папа выглядел очень смешным. Ну, продолжай же, мама.

354

— Маленький Эверетт спустился по лестнице и смешался с толпой танцующих. Какое-то время никто не обращал на него внимания, но вдруг его мать заметила странного вида фигурку.

355

— И я уверена, — вмешалась тётя Розмари, — быстренько отослала его обратно в постель. Мисс Флора засмеялась.

356

— А вот и нет! Гостям все это так понравилось, что они настояли на том, чтобы Эверетт остался. Некоторые женщины танцевали с ним — он посещал школу танцев и был отличным танцором. А потом его угостили земляникой со сливками и тортом.

357

Эллен добавила:

— А потом уложили в постель. Мисс Флора снова рассмеялась.

358

— Бедный мальчонка не заметил, как заснул во время еды, так что отцу пришлось на руках отнести его наверх. Его уложили в кровать прямо в костюме. Конечно, нянька его пришла в ужас, и боюсь, что остальную часть ночи бедная женщина думала, что её уволят. Но никто её не уволил. Она продолжала жить в этой семье, пока не выросли все дети.

359

— Это — замечательная история! — воскликнула Нэнси.

360

Она собралась было попросить мисс Флору рассказать ещё что-нибудь, но в этот момент зазвонил телефон. Трубку сняла тётя Розмари, крикнувшая из холла Нэнси:

— Это тебя.

361

Нэнси поспешно вышла в холл и, схватив трубку, крикнула:

— Алло! — Спустя минуту она воскликнула: — Папа! Как я рада слышать твой голос!

362

Мистер Дру сообщил, что он не нашёл Вилли Уортона и есть некоторые указания на то, что он не в Чикаго, а в другом городе.

363

— У меня есть ещё кое-какие дела, которые задержат меня здесь до завтрашнего вечера. Как дела у тебя?

364

— Я пока ещё не разгадала тайну, — сообщила ему дочь. — У нас произошли кое-какие новые странные события. Я буду очень рада видеть тебя здесь, в Клифвуде. Уверена, что ты сможешь мне помочь.

365

— Хорошо, я приеду. Но не пытайся меня встречать. Время слишком неопределённое, да к тому же может случиться и так, что мне придётся задержаться в Чикаго.

366

Мистер Дру сказал, что он доберётся до них на такси. Нэнси вкратце рассказала ему о том, что произошло в «Двух вязах» и, поговорив ещё немного, повесила трубку. Вернувшись к остальным, она рассказала им, что мистер Дру обещал приехать.

367

— О! Я буду так рада познакомиться с твоим отцом! — сказала мисс Флора. — Для разгадки нашей тайны нам может понадобиться юридический совет.

368

После этого замечания наступила короткая пауза. Все молчали. Вдруг они изумлённо переглянулись. Откуда-то сверху доносились жалобные звуки скрипки. Неужели призрак опять включил радио?

369

Нэнси выскочила из-за стола, чтобы выяснить, так ли это.

370

ПУГАЮЩИЕ ГЛАЗА

371

Пять минут спустя Нэнси была уже на втором этаже. Скрипка вдруг замолчала.

372

Она бросилась в комнату тёти Флоры, откуда, похоже, доносились звуки. Радио включено не было. Нэнси быстро дотронулась до приёмника, чтобы проверить, нагрелся ли он хоть сколько-нибудь, потому что это означало бы, что он только что работал.

373

— Нет, музыка исходила не отсюда, — сказала она себе, убедившись, что приёмник холодный.

374

Выбегая из комнаты, Нэнси чуть не столкнулась с Эллен.

— Что ты выяснила? — спросила та, еле переводя дух.

375

— Пока ничего, — ответила Нэнси и помчалась в спальню тёти Розмари проверить радиоприёмник, стоявший там на тумбочке возле кровати.

376

Этот приёмник тоже оказался холодным.

377

Они с Эллен стояли посреди комнаты, озадаченно нахмурив лоб.

— Но ведь была же музыка, правда? — спросила Эллен.

378

— Я её слышала совершенно отчётливо, — ответила Нэнси. — Но где тот человек, что играл на скрипке? Или поставил на проигрыватель пластинку, или включил спрятанный радиоприёмник? Эллен, я убеждена, что незваный гость проникает в дом через какой-то потайной вход и пытается всех нас запугать.

— Что ему вполне удаётся, — заметила Эллен. — Всё это действительно крайне загадочно. «И опасно», — подумала Нэнси.

379

— Давай завтра сразу же после завтрака продолжим наши поиски, — предложила Эллен.

380

— Мы это сделаем, — ответила Нэнси. — Ну, а пока что, я думаю, мисс Флора и тётя Розмари, как и мы с тобой, нуждаются в защите полиции.

381

— Думаю, ты права, — согласилась Эллен. — Пойдём вниз и предложим остальным.

382

Девушки вернулись на первый этаж, и Нэнси рассказала миссис Хэйз и мисс Флоре, что ей не удалось выяснить происхождение музыки; она также сообщила им о своём намерении обратиться в полицию.

383

Ах, милочка, в полиции только посмеются над нами, — запротестовала мисс Флора.

384

— Мама, дорогая, — сказала её дочь, — капитан и его подчинённые раньше не поверили нам только потому, что решили, будто нам все это просто кажется. Но Нэнси и Эллен уже дважды в разное время слышали музыку и видели, как качалась люстра. Я уверена, что капитан Росслэнд поверит Нэнси и пришлёт сюда охранника.

385

Нэнси улыбнулась мисс Флоре.

— Я не стану просить капитана поверить в существование призрака или организовать охоту за ним. Я думаю, единственное, о чём нам в данный момент следует просить, — это прислать человека, который в ночное время патрулировал бы окрестности. Я уверена, что, когда мы бодрствуем, нам решительно ничто не угрожает, но должна признаться, меня несколько беспокоит перспектива ложиться в постель, спрашивая себя, что ещё выкинет теперь призрак.

386

Миссис Тернбулл наконец дала своё согласие, и Нэнси пошла звонить в полицию. Капитан Росслэнд без разговоров согласился чуть попозже прислать человека.

387

— Он будет являться каждую ночь, на столько времени, на сколько вам будет нужно, — заявил полицейский офицер. — И я ему скажу, чтобы он не звонил вам в дверь, дабы сообщить о своём появлении. Если действительно существует какой-то человек, который врывается в дом через потайной ход, лучше, чтобы он не знал, что около вашего дома дежурит полицейский.

388

— Понятно, — сказала Нэнси,

389

Когда мисс Флора, её дочь и обе девушки ложились в постель, они были уверены, что ночь пройдёт спокойно. Нэнси считала, что, если ничего непредвиденного не случится, это будет означать, что призрак проникает в дом прямо с улицы. Значит, размышляла она, он увидел охранника и не решился войти в дом.

390

Надежды юной сыщицы на спокойную ночь были бесцеремонно разрушены. Она неожиданно проснулась около полуночи, уверенная, что слышала рядом какой-то шум. Однако сейчас в доме было тихо. Нэнси внимательно прислушалась и в конце концов встала с постели.

391

— Может, шум, который я слышала, доносился извне, — говорила она себе.

392

Подойдя на цыпочках к окну, чтобы не разбудить Эллен, Нэнси стала вглядываться в залитую лунным светом окружающую местность. Тени ветвей, качавшихся под лёгким ветерком, двигались взад-вперёд по лужайке. До Нэнси донёсся аромат цветущих роз.

393

«Какая божественная ночь!» — подумала Нэнси.

394

Внезапно она насторожилась. Какая-то фигура, крадучись, выглянула из-за дерева и перебежала к кустарнику. Кто это был — охранник или призрак? Пока Нэнси внимательно вглядывалась, не заметит ли она каких-либо новых передвижений таинственной фигуры, она услышала приглушённые шаги в холле. В следующее мгновение в её дверь громко постучали. Нэнси! Проснись! Нэнси, иди скорее сюда!

395

Это был голос мисс Флоры, звучавший крайне испуганно. Нэнси торопливо отперла дверь и широко её распахнула. К этому времени проснулась и вылезла из постели и Эллен.

396

— Что случилось? — сонно спросила она.

397

В холл вошла также тётя Розмари. Её мать, не сказав больше ни слова, направилась к себе в спальню. За нею последовали остальные, думая на ходу, что что-то они там застанут. Луна освещала часть комнаты, но тот её угол, который находился ближе к холлу, был погружён во тьму.

398

— Вон! Там, наверху! — мисс Флора указала на ближайший к холлу угол комнаты.

399

На пришедших смотрели сверху вниз два горящих глаза!

400

Нэнси мигом включила свет, и все увидели наверху большую коричневую сову, усевшуюся на старомодной гипсовой лепнине, украшавшей потолок.

401

— Ох! — вскричала тётя Розмари. — Каким образом эта птица могла залететь сюда?

402

Остальные не нашлись сразу, что ответить. Потом Нэнси, не желая пугать мисс Флору, сказала как можно более небрежным тоном:

— Вероятно, проникла через трубу.

403

— Но… — начала было возражать Эллен. Нэнси предостерегающе подмигнула подруге, и Эллен не закончила фразу. Нэнси была уверена, что она собиралась сказать: заслонка, мол, была закрыта, так что через трубу птица никоим образом залететь не могла. Нэнси спросила у мисс Флоры, была ли дверь её спальни заперта.

404

— О да! — решительно ответила та. — Я бы ни за что не оставила её не запертой.

405

Нэнси ничего не сказала по этому поводу. Зная, что мисс Флора страдает некоторой забывчивостью, она сочла вполне возможным, что дверь заперта не была. Незваный гость вошёл, дал сове усесться под потолком, а потом произвёл ровно столько шума, сколько требовалось, чтобы разбудить спя-пгую женщину.

406

Чтобы проверить свою собственную память, она подошла к камину и заглянула внутрь. Заслонка была закрыта.

407

«Но если дверь в холл была закрыта, — размышляла она, — значит, у призрака есть какой-то другой способ проникать в эту комнату. И охранник его не заметил!»

408

Её размышления прервал голос мисс Флоры:

Я не хочу, чтобы эта сова оставалась здесь всю ночь. надо её прогнать.

409

— Это будет нелегко, — вмешалась тётя Розмари. — У совы очень острые когти и клюв, и они пускают их в ход против тех, кто пытается нарушить их покой. Мама, пойдём ко мне и проведи остаток ночи у меня в спальне. Мы выгоним сову утром.

410

Нэнси уговорила мисс Флору удалиться вместе с её дочерью.

— А я останусь здесь и попытаюсь уговорить госпожу Сову оставить этот дом. Найдётся у вас пара старых толстых перчаток?

411

— У меня в комнате есть, — ответила тётя Розмари. — Они из толстой кожи. Я ими пользуюсь для работы в саду.

412

Она принесла перчатки Нэнси, и та тотчас же надела их на руки. После этого она предложила тёте Розмари и её матери удалиться. Улыбаясь, она сказала:

— Мы с Эллен приступаем к осуществлению операции «Сова».

413

Когда дверь за двумя женщинами закрылась, Нэнси подтащила стул в угол комнаты и поставила его прямо под птицей. Она рассчитывала на то, что яркий верхний свет притупил зрение совы и ей удастся без особого труда схватить её.

414

— Эллен, открой, пожалуйста, одну из рам с защитной противомоскитной сеткой, — попросила она. — И пожелай мне удачи!

415

— Смотри не выпусти эту тварь, — предупредила Эллен, отперев раму и широко распахнув её.

416

Нэнси вытянулась на цыпочках так, что как раз доставала до птицы. Молниеносным движением она обхватила её тело обеими руками, зажав при этом её когти. Сова начала немедленно кивать головой и клевать ей руки выше перчаток. Кривясь от боли, Нэнси соскочила со стула и пробежала через комнату.

417

Птица отчаянно билась, направляя свой клюв то в одну, то в другую сторону. Однако Нэнси удалось держать её в таком положении, что большая часть ударов попадала мимо цели. Она вытянула руки с птицей за окно, выпустила её и отошла назад. Эллен закрыла раму с сеткой и быстро закрепила шпингалет.

418

— Уф! — сказала Нэнси, с грустью поглядывая на свои запястья, где теперь ясно были видны несколько кровоточащих ранок, нанесённых клювом совы. — Как я рада, что с этим покончено!

419

— Я тоже, — сказала Эллен. — Давай запрём дверь мисс Флоры снаружи, чтобы этот самый призрак не мог принести больше никаких сов в наши комнаты.

420

Вдруг Эллен схватила Нэнси за руку.

— Я только что подумала кое о чём, — сказала она. — Предполагается, что снаружи нас охраняет полицейский. И тем не менее призрак сумел незамеченным проникнуть сюда.

421

— Либо так, либо имеется какой-то потайной ход в этот дом, проходящий под землёй, вероятно, в одной из надворных построек.

422

Нэнси рассказала о фигуре, крадучись вылезшей из-за дерева.

— Я должна немедленно выяснить, был ли это призрак или охранник. Немножко поразнюхаю здесь. Вполне возможно, что охранник просто не явился. — Нэнси улыбнулась. — Но, если он пришёл и чего-нибудь стоит, он меня заметит.

423

— Хорошо, — согласилась Эллен. — Только будь осторожнее, Нэнси! Ты, право же, идёшь на большой риск ради того, чтобы разрешить тайну «Двух вязов»!

424

Нэнси тихонько рассмеялась, направляясь в их спальню. Она быстро оделась, спустилась вниз, положила ключ от чёрного хода себе в карман и вышла из дома. Она украдкой спустилась по ступенькам и быстро спряталась за группой кустов.

425

Не видя вокруг никого, она вышла из-за них и пробежала через лужайку к большому клёну. Несколько мгновений она стояла, скрываясь в тени, а потом бросилась бегом к строению, которое в колониальные времена служило кухней.

426

На полпути к своей цели она услыхала за спиной шаги и обернулась. Футах в десяти от неё стоял какой-то мужчина. Быстрым движением рука его метнулась к кобуре на бедре.

— Стой! — скомандовал он.

427

НЕОЖИДАННОЕ ПАДЕНИЕ

428

Нэнси остановилась, как ей и было приказано. Глядя на неизвестного, она спросила:

— Кто вы?

429

— Я из полиции, мисс, — отвечал тот. — Можете называть меня просто Патриком. А вы кто?

430

Нэнси быстро объяснила, кто она, и попросила полицейского предъявить удостоверение. Он расстегнул пальто, вытащил кожаный бумажник и показал ей свой жетон, удостоверявший, что он полицейский в штатском. Зовут его Том Патрик.

431

— Видели ли вы кого-нибудь, слоняющегося по территории? — спросила его Нэнси.

432

— Ни души, мисс. Сегодня ночью тут было тише, чем на кладбище.

433

Когда юная сыщица рассказала ему о скрывающейся за деревьями фигуре, которую она видела из окна, полицейский рассмеялся.

— Наверное, вы видели меня, — сказал он. — Как видно, я не так ловко прячусь, как мне казалось. Смеясь, Нэнси сказала:

434

— Но меня, во всяком случае, вы быстренько сцапали.

435

Они побеседовали несколько минут. Том Патрик сообщил Нэнси, что жители Клифвуда считают миссис Тернбулл странноватой женщиной. По их мнению, если она полагает, что её дом навещают призраки, то эти мысли навеяны рассказами людей, которые в разное время жили в этом доме на протяжении последних ста лет.

436

— Может ли этот слух насчёт призрака затруднить продажу дома? — спросила Нэнси.

437

— Безусловно.

438

Нэнси сказала, что вся эта история просто безобразие.

— Миссис Тернбулл одна из самых милых женщин, каких я встречала за свою жизнь, и с головой у неё все абсолютно в порядке, если не считать того, что иной раз она бывает забывчива.

439

— Вы не думаете, что некоторые из тех происшествий, о которых мы слышали, — чистейший плод воображения? — спросил Том Патрик.

440

— Нет, не думаю.

441

Нэнси рассказала ему про сову, оказавшуюся в спальне мисс Флоры.

— Дверь была закрыта, все рамы с защитными сетками были закрыты, заслонка в трубе — тоже. Объясните мне, каким образом туда могла залететь сова.

442

Том Патрик посмотрел на неё расширенными глазами.

— Вы говорите, это произошло совсем недавно? — спросил он. Когда Нэнси кивнула, он добавил: — Конечно, я не могу быть одновременно всюду на этой территории, но я всё время ходил вокруг здания. С момента прихода я это делал всё время. Не могу себе представить, чтобы кто-то мог проникнуть в дом и я бы его не заметил.

443

— Я изложу вам свою теорию, — сказала Нэнси. — Я думаю, в какой-то другой точке на этой территории имеется потайной подземный вход в дом. Возможно, он начинается в какой-нибудь из надворных построек. Во всяком случае, завтра я отправлюсь на поиски.

444

— Ну что ж, желаю удачи, — сказал Том Патрик. — А если ночью что-нибудь произойдёт, я дам вам знать. Нэнси указала на окно на втором этаже.

— Это моя комната. Если у вас не будет возможности воспользоваться дверным молоточком, бросьте камешек в раму с защитной сеткой, и я проснусь. Я уверена, что обязательно услышу.

445

Охранник обещал, что он так и поступит, и Нэнси вернулась в дом. Она поднялась по лестнице и во второй раз — за эту ночь разделась. Эллен уже успела снова уснуть, поэтому Нэнси забралась в большую двуспальную кровать бесшумней

446

На следующее утро обе девушки проснулись почти одновременно, и Эллен сразу же потребовала, чтобы Нэнси подробно рассказала ей, что узнала накануне вечером, когда выходила из дома. Услыхав о том, как её подругу задержал охранник, она вздрогнула.

447

— Ведь тебе могла грозить вполне реальная опасность Нэнси, ты же не знала, кто этот человек. Ты просто обязана быть поосторожнее. А что, если бы этот мужчина оказался призраком?

448

Нэнси засмеялась, но ничего не ответила. Девушки спустились вниз и принялись готовить завтрак. Спустя несколько минут к ним присоединились тётя Розмари и её мама.

449

— Удалось ли тебе вчера вечером узнать ещё что-нибудь? — спросила миссис Хэйз Нэнси.

450

— Только то, что у нашего дома дежурит полицейский по имени Том Патрик.

451

Сразу же после завтрака юная сыщица заявила, что она намерена обследовать все надворные постройки поместья.

452

— Я буду искать подземный коридор, ведущий к дому. Вполне возможно, что мы потому не слышим глухого отзвука, когда простукиваем стены, что в том месте, где находится потайной ход, имеются двойные двери или стены.

453

Тётя Розмари внимательно поглядела на Нэнси.

— Ты — настоящий сыщик, Нэнси. Теперь я понимаю, почему Эллея так хотела, чтобы мы попросили именно тебя заняться поисками нашего призрака.

454

В глазах Нэнси мелькнул лукавый огонёк.

— Может, у меня и есть природный нюх, требуемый для сыска, — сказала она, — но какой от этого толк, если я не смогу разгадать эту тайну?

455

Обратившись к Эллен, она предложила надеть что-нибудь из старой одежды, которую они специально прихватили с собой.

456

Облачившись в джинсы и спортивные рубашки, девушки вышли из дома.

Первым делом Нэнси направилась к старому леднику. Она отодвинула скрипучую выдвижную дверь и заглянула вниз. Высокое и узкое строение было около десяти футов в высоту. На одной стене помещались ряды раздвижных дверей, расположенные один под другим.

457

— Я слышала от мисс Флоры, — сказала Эллен, — что в старину на реке откалывали зимой большие глыбы льда и доставляли их сюда на санях. Эти глыбы хранились здесь и перемещались по мере надобности сверху вниз через эти раздвижные двери.

458

— Это, пожалуй, исключает всякую возможность устройства здесь какого-либо подземного перехода в другое здание, — заметила Нэнси. — Я полагаю, что большую часть года всё здесь было заполнено льдом.

459

Пол был покрыт прелыми опилками, и, хотя Нэнси была уверена что ничего интересного она под ними не найдёт, она решила посмотреть. Увидев в углу старую, покрытую ржавчиной лопату, она схватила её и начала копать. Под опилками ничего, кроме грязи, не оказалось.

460

— Ну что ж, здесь мы ключа к нашей тайне не найдём, — заметила Эллен. Вместе с Нэнси они направились к следующему строению.

461

Оно в своё время служило коптильней. Пол здесь был земляной. В одном углу помещался небольшой очаг, где когда-то жгли ветки орешника, дававшие при горении много дыма. Дым поднимался по узкой трубе на второй этаж, где не было ни одного окна.

462

Здесь на крюках рядами висели громадные куски свинины и коптились, — пояснила Эллен. — Через несколько дней такой обработки они превращались в аппетитную ветчину и бекон.

463

Никаких признаков какого-то тайного отверстия здесь не было, и Нэнси вышла из маленького двухэтажного домика с остроконечной крышей и обошла его со всех сторон. Возле одной стены кирпичного здания торчали остатки лестницы, которая вела к какой-то двери. Теперь от лестницы остались только боковые опоры, на которой держались ступени.

464

— Эллен, подсади-ка меня, — попросила Нэнси. — Мне хочется заглянуть внутрь.

465

Эллен присела на корточки, Нэнси взобралась ей на плечи, после чего Эллен, упираясь руками в стену, медленно выпрямилась. Нэнси распахнула полусгнившую деревянную дверь.

466

— Там призрака нет! — объявила она.

467

Спрыгнув на землю, Нэнси направилась в помещение для прислуги. Но тщательный осмотр этого дома, построенного из кирпича и дерева, также не навёл на след потайного входа.

468

Оставалось осмотреть только одну постройку. Здесь, по словам Эллен, в старину держали экипажи. Здание было построено из кирпича и было довольно просторным. Никаких экипажей на его дощатом полу сейчас не было, но на стенах висела старая упряжь и вожжи. Нэнси остановилась на минутку, чтобы осмотреть одну уздечку, которая была украшена медальонами — женскими портретами ручной работы.

469

Её созерцательное раздумье было прервано резким криком. Обернувшись, она увидела Эллен, летящую вниз, в какую-то дыру, которая оказалась в полу. Нэнси мигом пересекла помещение и нагнулась над зияющей дырой в прогнившем полу.

470

— Эллен! — в тревоге крикнула она.

471

— Ничего со мной не случилось, — донёсся до неё голос снизу. — Здесь хорошо, пол мягкий. Брось мне, пожалуйста, свой фонарик.

472

Нэнси вынула из кармана джинсов фонарик и бросила его вниз.

473

— Я думала, может, я что-то такое открыла, — сказала Эллен, — Но это просто самая обыкновенная дыра. Пожалуйста, протяни мне руку, чтобы я могла выбраться отсюда.

474

Нэнси легла плашмя на пол и одной рукой обхватила опорный столб, стоявший в центре каретного сарая. Протянув другую руку вниз, она помогла Эллен вылезти.

475

— Нам тут надо быть поосторожнее, — сказала Нэнси, когда её подруга снова оказалась с ней рядом.

476

— Да уж! — согласилась Эллен, стряхивая грязь с джинсов. Падение Эллен навело Нэнси на мысль, что в полу могут иметься другие отверстия, одно из которых, возможно, служит входом в подземный переход. Однако ей не удалось обнаружить в каретном сарае ничего подозрительного, хотя она осветила своим фонариком каждый дюйм пола.

477

— Давай кончим на этом, — предложила Эллен. — Я Бог знает в каком виде, и, кроме того, мне есть хочется.

478

— Хорошо, — согласилась Нэнси. — А днём пойдёшь со мной обыскивать погреб?

— Конечно!

479

После ленча они начали обшаривать кладовые в погребе. Среди кладовых была холодная комната, пол и стены которой были выложены из камня. Когда-то здесь стояли бочки, в которых хранились яблоки. В другой комнате в своё время держали мешки с пшеничной мукой, ячменём, гречневой крупой и овсом.

480

— Все это выращивалось в поместье, — заметила Эллен.

481

— До чего же, наверное, это было замечательно, — воскликнула Нэнси. — Как хорошо было бы иметь возможность вернуться в прошлое, чтобы хоть одним глазком увидеть, как люди жили в то время!

482

— Если бы это было возможно, мы бы, пожалуй, узнали бы, как нам найти этот призрак! — сказала Эллен. Нэнси вполне была с ней согласна.

483

Девушки переходили в погребе из одной комнатки в другую, и Нэнси освещала фонариком каждый дюйм поверхности стен и полов. Порой сердце юной сыщицы начинало учащённо биться: ей казалось, она обнаружила потайную дверь или скрытое отверстие. Но всякий раз приходилось признать, что она ошиблась — в погребе ни того, ни другого они не нашли.

484

— Неудачный день у нас с тобой! — вздохнула Нэнси. — Но я не сдаюсь!

485

Эллен жаль было подругу. Чтобы подбодрить её, она со смехом сказала:

— Кладовая за кладовой, но для хранения призрака места не нашлось!

486

Нэнси невольно рассмеялась, и девушки вместе поднялись по лестнице в кухню. Переодевшись, они помогли тёте приготовить ужин. После еды, когда все собрались гостиной, Нэнси напомнила остальным, что она завтра ожидает приезда отца.

487

— Папа не хотел, чтобы я его встречала, но мне просто не терпится поскорее его увидеть. Я думаю, я буду встречать сё поезда из Чикаго, которые останавливаются здесь.

488

— Надеюсь, твой отец поживёт у нас два-три дня, — сказала мисс Флора. — У него наверняка появятся какие-нибудь идеи насчёт нашего призрака.

489

— И притом — плодотворные идеи, — добавила Нэнси. — Если он приедет ранним поездом, он может с нами позавтракать. Я буду встречать восьмичасовой поезд.

490

Однако позднее планы Нэнси внезапно изменились. Позвонила Ханна Груин и сообщила, что в дом звонили с телеграфа и прочли телеграмму рт мистера Дру. Он задерживается и в среду не приедет.

491

— Твой отец пишет в телеграмме, что даст знать, когда приедет, — добавила Ханна.

492

— Я разочарована! — воскликнула Нэнси. — Но надеюсь, эта задержка означает, что папа напал на след Вилли Уортона.

493

— Кстати, о Вилли Уортоне, — прервала её Ханна. — Я сегодня кое-что о нём слышала.

494

— Что именно? — спросила Нэнси.

495

— Что его видели возле реки здесь, в Ривер-Хайтс, всего несколько дней назад.

496

ДОСАДНАЯ ЗАДЕРЖКА

497

— Ты говоришь, Вилли Уортона видели около реки в Ривер-Хайтс? — недоверчиво переспросила Нэнси.

498

— Да, — подтвердила Ханна. — Я узнала об этом от нашего почтальона, мистера Риттера. Он — один из тех людей, которые продали свой участок железной дороге. Ты, Нэнси, знаешь, что мистер Риттер — человек очень честный и надёжный. Ну так вот, он говорит, что слышал, будто кое-кто из владельцев земли пытается принять участие в попытках Вилли Уортона выколотить из дороги побольше денег. Но сам мистер Риттер не желает иметь к этому никакого касательства. Он называет это вымогательством.

499

— Мистер Риттер сам видел Вилли Уортона? — с любопытством спросила Нэнси,

500

— Нет, — ответила домоправительница. — Кто-то из владельцев земельных участков сказал ему, что Вилли где-то тут, поблизости.

501

— Но тот человек мог ошибиться, — заметила Нэнси.

502

— Конечно, мог, — согласилась Ханна. — И я склонна думать, что так оно и есть. Раз твой отец остаётся в Чикаго он наверняка делает это из-за Вилли Уортона.

503

Нэнси не поделилась с Ханной мыслями, которые проносились в этот момент в её голове. Она попрощалась с Ханной весело, хотя на самом деле была очень встревожена.

504

«Возможно, Вилли Уортона действительно видели возле реки, — размышляла она. — А отец задерживается из-за того что его отъезду препятствует какой-то враг, в связи с проектом строительства железнодорожного моста. Один из недовольных земельных собственников мог последовать за ним в Чикаго. Не исключено, — продолжала она размышлять, — что отец нашёл Вилли Уортона, а тот сделал его своим пленником».

505

Нэнси сидела, погрузившись в тревожные мысли, когда в холл вошла Эллен.

— Случилось что-нибудь? — спросила она.

506

— Не знаю, — ответила Нэнси, — но у меня такое ощущение, что что-то действительно случилось. Папа телеграфировал, что завтра не приедет. Когда он уезжает, он никогда не шлёт телеграмм, а всегда звонит мне, или Ханне, или же в свою контору, и мне кажется странным, что он не поступил так же и на этот раз.

507

— Несколько дней тому назад ты мне сказала, что твоему отцу угрожали, — сказала Эллен. — Ты боишься, что это как-то связано с теми угрозами?

— Да, боюсь.

508

— Могу я чем-нибудь помочь? — предложила свои услуги Эллен.

509

— Спасибо, Эллен, но боюсь, ты ничего тут сделать не можешь. Да я и сама ничего не могу сделать. Нам придётся просто ждать. Может, отец снова подаст о себе весточку.

510

У Нэнси был такой подавленный вид, что Эллен начала лихорадочно думать, чем бы развеселить подругу. Вдруг ей что-то пришло в голову, и она пошла посоветоваться с мисс Флорой и тётей Розмари.

511

— Я думаю, это — прекрасная идея, если Нэнси согласится, — сказала тётя Розмари.

512

Эллен позвала Нэнси из холла и предложила всем пойти на чердак порыться в большом сундуке, где хранились старые костюмы.

513

— Мы можем даже в них нарядиться, — предложила мисс Флора, улыбаясь совсем как девочка.

514

— А вы, девушки, можете станцевать менуэт, — с энтузиазмом добавила тётя Розмари. — Мама очень хорошо играет на старинном спинете. Может быть, она сыграет для вас менуэт.

515

— Мне эта идея нравится, — сказала Нэнси. Она прекрасно понимала, что все трое пытаются поднять её настроение и была благодарна им за это. А кроме того, их предложение вообще звучало заманчиво — отчего не развлечься?

516

Все четверо поднялись по скрипучей лестнице на чердак. пешке ни одна из них не позаботилась захватить с собой карманный фонарик.

517

— Я спущусь вниз и принесу парочку, — предложила Нэнси. Да неважно, — возразила тётя Розмари. — Здесь есть свечи и подсвечники. Мы их держим тут на всякий случай.

518

Она зажгла две белые свечи, стоявшие в старомодных, похожих на блюдца медных подсвечниках, и повела всех к сундуку с костюмами.

519

Когда Эллен подняла тяжёлую крышку, Нэнси в восторге воскликнула:

— До чего же красивые костюмы!

520

С одного бока она видела шёлковые и атласные платья и кружева, с другого бока лежал сложенный розовый бархатный наряд. Они с Эллен вытянули платья из сундука и расправили их.

521

— Право же, насколько они красивее теперешних бальных туалетов! — заметила Эллен. — Особенно мужские костюмы.

522

Мисс Флора улыбнулась.

И они представляют каждого в гораздо более лестном виде!

523

Прежде чем выбрать что надеть, они распаковали весь сундук.

524

— Это светло-зелёное шёлковое платье с кринолином будет выглядеть на тебе прелестно, Нэнси, — заявила мисс Флора. — И я уверена, что оно как раз будет тебе в пору.

525

Нэнси внимательно поглядела на узенькую талию бального туалета.

— Я его примерю, — сказала она, добавив со смехом: — Но для того, чтобы застегнуть его на талии, мне, наверное, придётся не дышать. Ну и стройные же талии были у женщин в старину!

526

Эллен держала в руках мужской лиловый бархатный костюм. Он включал бриджи до колен и кружевное жабо. Тут же находились треугольная шляпа, длинные белые чулки и туфли с пряжками.

527

— Я, пожалуй, надену это и буду твоим кавалером, Нэнси, — сказала Эллен.

528

Сбросив свои лодочки, она сунула ноги в мужские туфли с пряжками. Все кругом громко рассмеялись. Когда-то эти туфли носил мужчина, у которого ноги были ровно вдвое больше ног Эллен.

529

— Ничего. Я натолкаю в носок бумагу, — весело заявила Эллен.

530

Мисс Флора и тётя Розмари выбрали костюмы для себя а потом открыли довольно большую коробку, лежавшую на дне сундука. В ней хранились всевозможные парики, которые носили в колониальные времена. Все они были ослепительно белые и завитые.

531

Захватив костюмы и парики, женщины разошлись по своим спальням, где они переоделись. Потом все спустились на первый этаж. Мисс Флора ввела всю компанию в комнату, находившуюся на другом конце холла, напротив гостиной. Впоследствии она была превращена в библиотеку, но в углу всё ещё стоял старинный спинет.

532

Мисс Флора села за инструмент и начала играть «Менуэт» Бетховена. Тётя Розмари села рядом с ней.

533

Нэнси и Эллен начали танцевать. Сцепив правые руки, они высоко поднимали их в воздух, потом делали два шага назад и отвешивали небольшой поклон. Они кружились, гордо вышагивали и даже вставили кое-какие па, с которыми в колониальные времена ни один танцор не мог быть знаком. Тётя Розмари хихикала и хлопала в ладоши,

534

— Хотела бы я, чтобы президент Вашингтон пришёл и полюбовался вами, — сказала она, исполняя свою роль в представлении, — Миссис Нэнси, сделайте одолжение, исполните этот танец ещё раз, а вы, мистер Корнинг, будьте так любезны снова стать партнёром вашей прекрасной дамы.

535

Девушки с трудом удерживались, чтобы не прыснуть. Эллен отвесила своей тётке низкий поклон, держа в руке треугольную шляпу, и сказала:

— К вашим услугам, миледи. Любое ваше желание для меня — закон.

536

Менуэт был повторён, а потом, когда мясе Флора перестала играть, девушки уселись.

537

— Ах, это было так весело! — вскричала Нэнси. — Когда-нибудь я бы хотела… Погодите! Слушайте! — вдруг скомандовала она.

538

С улицы она услышала громкий голос:

— Идите сюда! Вы, те, что в доме, идите сюда!

539

Нэнси и Эллен вскочили со своих кресел и ринулись к входной двери. Нэнси включила освещение на крыльце, и обе девушки выбежали на улицу.

540

— Сюда! — звал мужской голос.

541

Нэнси и Эллен сбежали по ступеням на лужайку. Прямо перед ними стоял сержант полиции, Том Патрик. Он крепко держал как в тисках худого, согнувшегося человека, которому, как решили девушки, должно было быть лет пятьдесят.

542

— Это ваш призрак? — спросил полицейский.

543

Пленник всячески рвался из его рук, но освободиться ему не удавалось. Девушки поспешно подошли поближе, чтобы разглядеть мужчину.

544

— Я его поймал, когда он тайком шнырял тут вокруг поместья, — объявил Том Патрик,

545

— Отпустите меня, — сердито кричал мужчина. — Никакой я не призрак. О чём вы говорите?

546

— Может, вы и не призрак, но вы — вполне возможно, тот самый вор, который обчищает этот дом.

547

— Что! — воскликнул пленник. — Я не вор! Я живу тут, по соседству. Вам всякий скажет, что за мной ничего плохого не водится.

548

— Как ваша фамилия и где вы живёте? — настаивал полицейский. Он позволил мужчине стать прямо, но продолжал крепко держать его за руку.

549

— Меня зовут Альберт Уотсон, и я живу на улице Тертл-роуд.

550

— Что вы делали на чужой территории? Альберт Уотсон ответил, что он шёл самым коротким путём к себе домой. Его жена забрала на весь вечер их машину.

551

— Я был в гостях у своего друга. Можете ему позвонить и проверить мои слова. Можете также позвонить моей жене. Возможно, она уже вернулась. Она приедет и заберёт меня.

552

Охранник напомнил Альберту Уотсону, что тот не объяснил, с какой целью он шнырял по чужой территории.

553

— Ну что ж, объясню, — сказал пленник. — Я это делал из-за вас. Я слышал в городе, что в этом месте дежурит полицейский, и я не хотел напороться на вас. Я опасался именно того, что произошло. — Мужчина немного успокоился. — По-моему, кстати, вы неплохой страж.

554

Патрик отпустил руку Альберта Уотсона,

— Ваша версия звучит правдоподобно, но мы зайдём в дом и сделаем несколько звонков по телефону, чтобы проверить, правду ли вы говорите.

555

— Пожалуйста, вы все узнаете. Да я ведь ещё к тому же общественный нотариус. Нечестным людям не выдают лицензию на такую должность, — заявил нарушитель неприкосновенности чужой территории. Потом он уставился на Нэнси и Эллен. — Вы почему в таких странных нарядах?

556

— Мы… у нас… у нас был небольшой маскарад, — ответила Эллен. От волнения они совсем позабыли, как они одеты!

557

Девушки направились к дому, а двое мужчин последовали за ними. Когда мистер Уотсон и охранник увидели мисс Флору и тётю Розмари тоже в маскарадных костюмах, они с улыбкой уставились на них.

558

Нэнси представила мистера Уотсона, Мисс Флора сказала, что слышала о нём, хотя никогда с ним не встречалась. Два телефонных звонка подтвердили слова Уотсона. В скором времени к «Двум вязам» подъехала его жена, чтобы отвезти своего супруга домой, а Патрик вернулся к своим обязанностям.

559

Потом тётя Розмари выключила свет во всех комнатах первого этажа, и все четверо поднялись наверх. Двери спален были заперты, и все надеялись, что ночь пройдёт без происшествий,

560

— Хороший был день, Нэнси, — сказала Эллен, позёвывая и укладываясь в постель.

561

— Да, — отозвалась Нэнси. — Конечно, я немного разочарована, что мы не продвинулись с разгадкой тайны, но, может быть, к этому времени завтра… — Она взглянула на Эллен, которая ничего ей не ответила. Девушка уже крепко спала.

562

Сама Нэнси улеглась спустя несколько минут. Она лежала, глядя в потолок и перебирая в памяти события последних двух дней. Когда она вспоминала сцены на чердаке, где они доставали из старого сундука одежду, она вдруг вздрогнула от какого-то внутреннего толчка.

563

— Та часть стены, позади сундука! — сказала она себе. — Панельная обшивка там чем-то отличалась от обшивки остальных стен чердака. Может, она передвижная и ведёт к потайному выходу! Завтра я это выясню!

564

ПОЛНОЧНАЯ ВАХТА

565

Как только утром девушки проснулись, Нэнси рассказала Эллен о своём плане.

566

— Я пойду с тобой, — сказала Эллен, — Господи, как мне хочется разгадать эту тайну призрака! Боюсь, что вся эта история начинает сказываться на здоровье мисс Флоры, и всё-таки она отказывается покинуть «Два вяза».

567

— Может, нам удастся уговорить тётю Розмари держать её большую часть дня в саду, — сказала Нэнси. — Там просто изумительно. Мы можем даже устроить ленч под деревьями.

568

— Я уверена, что им это понравится, — одобрила Эллен. — Давай, как только спустимся вниз, предложим им это.

569

Обеим женщинам идея понравилась. Тётя Розмари разгадала их стратегический план и была очень благодарна девушкам за заботу.

570

Когда они позавтракали, Нэнси предложила:

— Я перемою и вытру всю посуду. Мисс Флора, почему бы вам прямо сейчас не пойти с тётей Розмари в сад и не погреться на солнышке?

571

Хрупкая старая женщина улыбнулась. Под глазами у неё были тёмные круги, свидетельствовавшие о бессонной ночи.

572

— А я, — весело вставила Эллен, — все тут пропылесошу и вытру пыль во всех комнатах первого этажа. У меня уйдёт на это менее получаса.

573

Её родственницы заразились её бодрым настроением, и мисс Флора сказала:

— Как бы мне хотелось, чтобы вы, девушки, жили здесь, с нами, всё время. Несмотря на все наши неприятности, вы вернули нам способность радоваться жизни.

574

В ответ на комплимент обе девушки улыбнулись. Как только две старые женщины вышли из дома, девушки энергично принялись за работу. К концу установленного ими срока, то есть через полчаса — первый этаж был безупречно чист. Затем Нэнси и Эллен перешли на второй этаж, быстро застлали постели и привели в порядок ванные комнаты.

575

— Ну, а теперь возьмёмся за призрака, — воскликнула Эллен, размахивая своим электрическим фонариком.

576

Нэнси вытащила из ящика письменного стола свой фонарик.

577

— Давай посмотрим, удастся ли нам научиться без скрипа подниматься по лестнице на чердак, — предложила она. — Такое умение может нам пригодиться.

578

Задача оказалась весьма трудной. Прежде чем девушки установили, как надо шагать, чтобы лестница при этом не скрипела, им пришлось основательно, дюйм за дюймом, обследовать каждую ступеньку.

579

— Это испытание на способность запоминать! — сказала со смехом Эллен. — Ну-ка, я попробую повторить, какого порядка надо придерживаться. Первая ступенька — ногу придвинуть как можно ближе к левой стене. Вторая ступенька — наступать на центральную часть. Третья ступенька — поближе к правой стене. Мне для этого потребуются три ноги!

580

Нэнси засмеялась.

— Что касается меня, то я через вторую ступеньку просто перешагну. Так, посмотрим, что дальше. На четвёртой и пятой можно наступать на центральную часть, но на шестой надо держаться ближе к левой стене, а на седьмой — ближе к правой…

581

Эллен прервала её.

— Зато на восьмой, где ни наступи, раздаётся скрип. Так что её тоже надо перешагнуть.

582

— Девятая, десятая и одиннадцатая — в порядке, — припоминала Нэнси. — Но после этого, до пятнадцатой ступеньки — просто беда!

583

— Дай-ка я теперь попробую вспомнить, — сказала Эл-лён — — На двенадцатой надо двинуться сначала влево, потом вправо и ещё раз вправо. А как это сделать без прыжка? Этак потеряешь равновесие и свалишься вниз.

584

— А что если через четырнадцатую перешагнуть, вытянуть ногу как можно дальше и наступить на верхнюю ступеньку в левой её части, где она не скрипит? — отозвалась Нэнси. — Пошли, давай попробуем!

585

Вместе с Эллен они вернулись на второй этаж и начали подъем, который, по замыслу, должен был быть беззвучным.

Однако поначалу обе они делали столько ошибок, что лестница ужасно скрипела. В конце концов им всё же удалось назубок выучить безопасные места и научиться всходить по лестнице совершенно беззвучно.

586

Нэнси включила свой фонарик и навела его на ближайшую стену, обшитую панелями.

Эллен долго всматривалась в неё и наконец сказала: эта стена обшита невысокими панелями, тянущимися от потолка до пола. Тут все составлено из кусочков.

587

— Верно, — заметила Нэнси. — Но посмотри вон на тот кусок стены позади сундука с костюмами, около трубы. Тебе не кажется, что он чем-то отличается от других? Он сделан из какой-то другой древесины.

588

Девушки пересекли чердак, и Нэнси направила луч своего фонарика на подозрительный участок панели.

589

— Действительно, он на вид не похож на остальные, — согласилась Эллен. — Я думаю, тут может находиться дверь. Но здесь нет ни ручки, ни какой-либо железки, за которую можно было бы ухватиться. — Она провела пальцем по панельной плите над самым полом, следуя швам по краям плиты, площадь которой составляла четыре фута на два с половиной.

590

— Если это потайная дверь, — заметила Нэнси, — то ручка должна быть на той стороне.

591

— Как же нам её открыть?

592

— Можем попытаться взломать её, — предложила Нэнси. — Но сначала я хочу её проверить.

593

Она простучала костяшками пальцев всю панель, и лицо её выразило разочарование.

— Позади неё определённо никаких пустот нет.

594

— Давай проверим как следует, — предложила Эллен. — Я спущусь вниз и принесу отвёртку и молоток. Посмотрим, что получится, если мы вобьём в эту щель отвёртку.

595

— Это — хорошая мысль, Эллен,

596

Пока девушка отсутствовала, Нэнси осмотрела остальные стены и пол чердака. Никакого другого подозрительного участка она не обнаружила. Тут вернулась Эллен. Вставив отвёртку в одну из щелей, она начала ударять по ручке молотком. Нэнси с надеждой наблюдала. Отвёртка легко прошла через щель, но сразу же после этого натолкнулась на какое-то препятствие. Эллен вытащила отвёртку.

— Нэнси, попробуй ты, может, тебе повезёт.

597

Нэнси выбрала другую щель, но результат был тот же.

Никакого полого пространства позади этой части чердачной стены не оказалось.

598

— Моя интуиция меня по ела, — призналась Нэнси. Эллен пре ожила отказаться от этой затеи и спуститься вниз.

— Я думаю, скоро придёт почтальон. — Она улыбнулась. — Я жду письма от Джима. Мама сказала, что будет пересылать мне сюда всю мою почту.

599

Нэнси не хотелось прекращать поиски, но она кивнула головой и дала подруге знак спускаться по лестнице. После этого она села на пол и подпёрла подбородок обеими руками Глядя перед собой, Нэнси обратила внимание на то, что Эллен, в своём нетерпеливом желании поскорее увидеть почтальона, не заботилась о том, чтобы спуститься по лестнице тихонько. Шум стоял такой, словно Эллен нарочно выбирала на каждой ступеньке самую скрипучую точку.

600

Нэнси слышала, как Эллен вышла через парадную дверь, и вдруг поняла, что она осталась в огромном доме совсем одна. «Это может навести призрака на мысль нанести сюда визит — подумала она. — Если он где-то поблизости, он мог решить, что я ушла вместе с Эллен. И тогда я смогу узнать, где находится тайное отверстие».

601

Нэнси сидела совершенно неподвижно и внимательно прислушивалась. Вдруг она вскинула голову. Показалось ей или она на самом деле услышала скрип ступенек? Нет, она не ошиблась. Она напрягла слух, стараясь определить, откуда доносятся звуки.

602

«Я уверена, что не с чердачной и не с парадной лестницы. И не с чёрного хода. Даже если призрак находился в кухне и открыл дверь на второй этаж, он должен был знать, что дверь на верхней площадке лестницы заперта с другой стороны».

603

Вдруг сердце у Нэнси ёкнуло. Она была совершенно уверена, что скрип доносился откуда-то из-за чердачной стены. «Потайная лестница , — взволнованно пронеслось у неё в голове. — Может быть, призрак в эту минуту всходит на второй этаж?!»

604

Подождав, пока звуки прекратились, Нэнси поднялась на ноги, бесшумно спустилась на цыпочках по ступеням чердачной лестницы и огляделась вокруг. Ничего не было слышно. Быть может, призрак притаился в одной из спален — вероятно, в спальне мисс Флоры?

605

Бесшумно шагая, Нэнси заглянула в каждую комнату по очереди. Но ни в одной из них никого не было.

606

«Может, он на первом этаже?» — подумала Нэнси.

607

Она спустилась по парадной лестнице, прижимаясь к стене, чтобы не производить никакого шума. Очутившись на первом этаже, она заглянула в гостиную. Никого. Потом она оглядела библиотеку, столовую и кухню. Никого нигде не оказалось.

608

Выходит, призрак всё-таки не заходил в дом, — решила Нэнси. — Возможно, собирался войти, но потом передумал.

609

— Однако она больше чем когда-либо была уверена, что тайный вход в дом через скрытую лестницу существует.

Но как его найти? Вдруг её осенило. Щёлкнув пальцами она воскликнула:

— Я знаю, что делать: я устрою ловушку для призрака!

610

«Какое-то время тому назад он утащил драгоценности, размышляла Нэнси, — но такого рода кражи прекратились. По-видимому, он боялся подниматься на второй этаж.

611

Интересно, не пропало ли что-нибудь на первом этаже? Может, он унёс серебро или прихватил что-нибудь из провизии?»

612

Нэнси подошла к двери чёрного хода, открыла её и обратилась к Эллен, которая сидела теперь в саду с мисс Флорой и тётей Розмари.

— Не начать ли нам готовить ленч, что ты на это скажешь? — крикнула она, не желая расстраивать мисс Флору упоминанием о таинственном призраке.

613

— Идёт! — сказала Эллен. Через несколько минут она присоединилась к Нэнси. Та спросила подругу, получила ли она письмо.

614

Глаза у Эллен так и засверкали.

— Конечно, получила. Ах, Нэнси, я просто жду не дождусь, когда Джим вернётся! Нэнси улыбнулась,

— Ты его так расписываешь, что и мне не терпится поскорее его увидеть. — После этого она рассказала Эллен истинную причину, побудившую её вызвать подругу в кухню. Она описала шаги, раздававшиеся, как она была уверена, на потайной скрипучей лестнице, и добавила: — Если выяснится, что пропали какие-нибудь продукты или ещё что-нибудь, мы будем знать, что он снова здесь побывал.

615

Эллен предложила проверить столовое серебро.

— Я примерно знаю, сколько чего должно быть в ящике буфета, — сказала она.

616

— А я проверю, как дело обстоит с продовольственными запасами, — вызвалась Нэнси. — Я довольно хорошо помню, что лежало в холодильнике и на полке в кладовке.

617

Очень скоро обе девушки обнаружили недостачу. Эллен сказала, что пропало около дюжины чайных ложечек, а Нэнси установила, что исчезло несколько банок консервов, какое-то количество яиц и литр молока.

618

— Похоже, этого вора просто невозможно поймать, — вздохнула Эллен.

619

Повинуясь случайному порыву, Нэнси сняла со стенки висевшие там блокнот и карандаш. Приложив палец к губам, чтобы Эллен не вздумала комментировать её действия, Нэнси написала на вырванном из блокнота листочке:

620

«Я думаю, единственный способ поймать призрак — это? устроить ему ловушку. Я полагаю, у него есть в нескольких местах спрятанные подслушивающие устройства, и он слышит все планы, о которых мы договариваемся».

621

Прочитав записку, Эллен молча кивнула. Нэнси далее написала:

«Я не хочу волновать мисс Флору и тётю Розмари, поэтому давай будем держать наши планы в тайне. Я предлагаю сегодня вечером отправиться спать в обычное время и поговорить вслух о наших планах на завтра. На самом же деле мы раздеваться не станем. Часов в двенадцать ночи давай спустимся на цыпочках вниз и станем наблюдать. Я буду ждать в кухне. Ты согласна остаться в гостиной?»

622

Эллен снова кивнула. Решив, что они слишком долго молчат и, если возле них находится кто-то, пытающийся их подслушать, он может что-нибудь заподозрить, Нэнси громко сказала:

— Эллен, что бы мисс Флора и тётя Розмари хотели получить к ленчу?

623

— А? Гм… — Эллен трудно было переключиться на новую тему. — Они… гм… они обе любят суп.

624

— Тогда я сделаю бульон с протёртым куриным мясом, — сказала Нэнси. — Пожалуйста, передай мне банку куриных консервов с рисом. А я пойду за молоком.

625

Пока Эллен выполняла её поручение, Нэнси чиркнула спичкой, поднесла свою записку к раковине и сожгла бумагу над нею.

626

Эллен улыбнулась.

«Ни о чём-то Нэнси не забывает!» — подумала она про себя.

627

Готовя ленч, девушки весело болтали и наконец вынесли в сад четыре подноса. О своём плане на ночь они не упоминали. День, проведённый в саду, явно пошёл на пользу мисс Флоре, и девушки были уверены, что в эту ночь она будет спать хорошо.

628

План Нэнси был приведён в исполнение во всех деталях. В тот самый момент, когда стоячие часы в холле пробили полночь, …Нэнси появилась в кухне и уселась ждать возможных событий. Эллен поместилась в одном из кресел гостиной, рядом с дверью, ведущей в холл. Обе комнаты были залиты лунным светом, но девушки устроились в тени.

629

Эллен мысленно повторяла дальнейшие инструкции, которые написала ей днём Нэнси. Юная сыщица предлагала: если план кого-либо увидит, она должна подбежать к парадной Двери и громко крикнуть: «Полиция!» В то же самое время она Должна постараться заметить, куда юркнет незваный гость.

630

Минуты шли за минутами. В доме не слышно было ни звука. Вдруг Нэнси услыхала шум открывшегося парадного и громкий, отчётливый голос Эллен, зовущий: «Полиция! Помогите! Полиция!»

631

НЕУЛОВИМЫЙ ПРИЗРАК

632

К тому времени, когда Нэнси добежала до парадного холла, в дом успел ворваться полицейский страж, Том Патрик.

633

— Я тут! — крикнул он. — Что случилось? Эллен провела его в гостиную и зажгла люстру.

634

— Вон тот диван около камина, — сказала она дрожащим голосом. — Он двинулся. Я видела, как он двинулся!

635

— Вы хотите сказать, его кто-то сдвинул с места? — спросил полицейский.

636

— Я… я не знаю, — ответила Эллен. — Мне не удалось никого увидеть.

637

Нэнси подошла к старомодному дивану, стоявшему в нише рядом с камином. В данный момент он, без сомнения, находился на своём обычном месте. Если призрак и сдвигал его куда-то, то он вернул его потом на место.

638

— Давайте вытащим его из ниши и посмотрим, что окажется за ним, — предложила Нэнси.

639

Она потянула диван за один конец, а Патрик тащил за другой. Нэнси подумала: человек, который двигал его в одиночку, должен быть очень силён.

640

— Вы полагаете, что ваш призрак проник через люк или что-нибудь в этом роде? — спросил полицейский.

641

Обе девушки промолчали. Они уже однажды обыскивали это место, да и теперь, когда они вглядывались в каждый дюйм пола и осматривали три стены, окружавшие спинку и боковые стенки дивана, они не видели ничего, что походило бы на какое-либо отверстие.

642

У Эллен был пристыженный вид.

— Я… я думаю, я ошиблась, — заявила она наконец. Обернувшись к полицейскому, она добавила: — Простите, что я оторвала вас от работы.

643

— Да ничего, не расстраивайтесь. Я, пожалуй, вернусь на свой сторожевой пост, — сказал Патрик и покинул дом.

644

— Ах, Нэнси! — вскричала Эллен. — Мне так неприятно!

645

Она собиралась ещё что-то сказать, но Нэнси приложила палец к губам. Они могли прибегнуть к той же тактике для поимки вора в другой раз. Нэнси не хотела выдавать их тайну — а вдруг вор их подслушивает!

646

Она решила, что после недавней суматохи призрак в эту ночь снова не появится. Она подала Эллен знак тихонько подняться наверх и немного поспать. Снова держась поближе к стене, они бесшумно поднялись по лестнице, дошли на цыпочках до своей спальни и легли в постель.

647

Желая шёпотом Нэнси спокойной ночи, Эллен сонным голосом сказала:

— Я рада хоть, что не разбудила мисс Флору и тётю Розмари.

648

Хотя Нэнси была уверена, что в эту ночь призрак больше войдёт в дом, утром выяснилось, что она ошиблась. Где-то между двенадцатью ночи и восемью часами утра, когда они с Эллен принялись готовить завтрак, было украдено ещё кое-что из провизии. Взял ли призрак её для собственных нужд или же с единственной целью — встревожить обитателей «Двух вязов»?

649

— На этот раз я упустила свой шанс, — пробормотала Нэнси на ухо подруге. — После этого, пожалуй, не стоит решать за призрака, что он ещё способен выкинуть.

650

В девять часов позвонила по телефону Ханна Груин. Трубку случайно сняла Нэнси. После обычного обмена приветствиями она с удивлением услышала слова Ханны:

— Я хотела бы поговорить с твоим отцом.

651

— Ты что? Папы здесь нет! — сообщила ей Нэнси. — Разве ты не помнишь, в телеграмме было сказано, что он не приедет.

652

— Его у вас нет?! — воскликнула Ханна. — О, это плохо,

Нэнси, очень плохо!

653

— Что ты имеешь в виду, Ханна? — испуганно спросила Нэнси.

654

Домоправительница объяснила, что вскоре после получения телеграммы во вторник вечером мистер Дру сам позвонил по телефону.

— Он хотел знать, все ли ещё ты в Клифвуде, Нэнси. Когда я сказала, что ты там, он сообщил, что остановится там в среду по пути домой.

655

Нэнси была испугана, но она спросила ровным голосом:

— Ханна, а ты сказала ему про телеграмму?

656

— Нет. Я не сочла это необходимым, — ответила та.

657

— Ханна, дорогая, — сказала Нэнси чуть не плача, — боюсь, что та телеграмма была не настоящая!

658

— Не настоящая?! — воскликнула Ханна.

659

— Да. Враги папы послали её для того, чтобы помешать мне его встретить!

660

— Ах, Нэнси, — заголосила Ханна, — уж не думаешь ли ты, что те враги, о которых предостерегал тебя мистер Гомбер, захватили твоего отца и держат в плену?

661

— Боюсь, что да, — сказала Нэнси. У неё начали подламываться коленки, и она рухнула в кресло, стоявшее возле телефона.

662

— Что же нам делать? — спросила Ханна. — Хочешь, я извещу полицию?

663

— Пока не надо. Я хочу раньше кое-что проверить.

664

— Хорошо, Нэнси. Но держи меня в курсе.

665

— Обязательно.

666

Нэнси положила трубку и стала разглядывать различные телефонные справочники, лежавшие на столе. Найдя справочник, включавший телефонные номера Ривер-Хайтс, она отыскала номер телефона телеграфной конторы и позвонила туда, Она попросила ответившего оператора проверить, была ли во вторник получена телеграмма от мистера Дру. Через несколько минут ей ответили:

— У нас такая телеграмма не зарегистрирована.

667

Поблагодарив оператора, Нэнси повесила трубку. Теперь у неё от страха уже дрожали руки. Что случилось с её отцом?

668

Овладев собой, Нэнси обзвонила по очереди аэропорт, железнодорожную станцию и автобусные линии, обслуживающие Клифвуд. Она спрашивала, не произошло ли каких-либо несчастных случаев на рейсах из Чикаго вчера или во вторник вечером. Ей всюду ответили, что ничего не произошло.

669

— О боже, что же мне делать? — в ужасе спрашивала себя Нэнси.

670

Тут ей в голову пришла одна идея, и она сразу же позвонила в Чикагскую гостиницу, где останавливался её отец. Хотя она считала это маловероятным, а вдруг всё-таки он снова передумал и все ещё находится там. Но разговор с портье разрушил эту надежду.

671

— Нет, мистера Дру здесь нет. Он выписался во вторник вечером. Я не знаю его планов, но я соединю вас с главным носильщиком. Быть может, он вам поможет.

672

Уже через несколько секунд Нэнси разговаривала с носильщиком. Она спросила, что он может ей сообщить, чтобы помочь разгадать тайну исчезновения её отца.

— Всё, что мне известно, мисс, это что ваш отец, как он сказал мне, едет спальным вагоном и сойдёт где-то в среду утром, чтобы встретиться со своей дочерью.

673

— Спасибо! Большое вам спасибо, — сказала Нэнси. — Вы очень мне помогли.

674

Значит, её отец поехал домой поездом и, вероятно, доехал до Клифвуда. Теперь ей надо узнать, что с ним произошло после этого.

675

Рассказав тёте Розмари и Эллен о том, что ей удалось узнать, Нэнси села в свою машину и отправилась прямо на вокзал Клифвуда. Там она поговорила с билетным контролёром. К сожалению, он не мог припомнить никого из пассажиров, сошедших с двух поездов, которые прибыли в город из Чикаго в среду и которые отвечали бы описаниям Нэнси.

676

После этого Нэнси пошла побеседовать с таксистами. Судя по длинной очереди машин, выстроившихся возле вокзала, Нэнси решила, что здесь сейчас присутствуют все таксисты, обслуживающие вокзал. Отбывающих поездов не было уже около часа, а прибывающий экспресс ожидался минут через пятнадцать.

677

«Мне, кажется, повезло, — подумала девушка. — Наверняка кто-нибудь из этих шофёров отвозил папу». на переходила от одного таксиста к другому, но все они отрицали, что накануне отвозили куда-либо пассажира, похожего, по описаниям, на мистера Дру.

678

Нэнси начала впадать в панику. Она поспешно вошла в здание вокзала, нашла телефон-автомат и позвонила в местный полицейский участок. Нэнси попросила к телефону начальника, и тот сразу же подошёл.

679

— Капитан Росслэнд слушает, — чётко произнёс он.

680

Нэнси подробно рассказала ему о случившемся. Она упомянула о предостережении, сделанном её отцу в Ривер-Хайтс, и высказала опасение, что кто-то из его врагов теперь задерживает его против его воли.

681

— Это весьма серьёзно, мисс Дру, — признал капитан Росслэнд. — Я сейчас же поручу моим людям заняться этим делом.

682

Когда Нэнси выходила из будки, к ней подошла крупная седовласая женщина.

— Простите, мисс, я случайно услышала, что вы говорили. Мне кажется, я, пожалуй, могу вам помочь.

683

Нэнси удивилась и отнеслась к незнакомке с некоторым подозрением. Быть может, эта женщина связана с похитителями и собирается захватить и Нэнси, пообещав ей отвезти её к отцу.

684

— Почему вы с таким испугом на меня смотрите? — улыбаясь спросила незнакомка. — Я просто хотела вам сказать, что бываю здесь, на вокзале, каждый день: отсюда я езжу в соседний город. Я — медицинская сестра, и сейчас бываю там у одного больного.

685

— Ах вот в чём дело!

686

— Ну так вот. Вчера я была здесь в тот момент, когда подошёл чикагский поезд. Я обратила внимание на высокого красивого человека — похожего, по вашим описаниям, на вашего отца, — который сошёл с поезда. Он сел в такси, водителя которого зовут Гарри. У меня такое впечатление, что, по …какой-то причине, таксист не сказал вам правду. Давайте пойдём и вместе поговорим с ним.

687

Нэнси, с отчаянно бьющимся сердцем, пошла следом за женщиной. Она готова была ухватиться за любую соломин-КУ1 лишь бы узнать, где её отец.

688

— Здравствуйте, мисс Скэйд, — приветствовал медсестру таксист. — Как вы сегодня себя чувствуете?

689

— О! Совершенно нормально, — ответила сестра. — Послушайте, Гарри, вы сказали этой барышне, что вчера не возили пассажира, похожего, по её описаниям, на её отца. Но я сама видела, как именно такой мужчина садился в вашу машину. Что вы на это скажете?

690

Гарри низко опустил голову.

— Послушайте, мисс, — сказал он, обращаясь к Нэнси, — . у меня трое детей, и я не хочу, чтобы с ними что-нибудь случилось. Понимаете?

691

— Что вы хотите этим сказать? — спросила недоумевающе Нэнси.

692

Мужчина не ответил, и тогда мисс Скэйд сказала:

— Послушайте, Гарри. Эта девушка опасается, что её отца похитили. Вы просто обязаны сказать ей всё, что вам известно.

693

— Похитили! — вскрикнул таксист. — Ах ты, батюшки светы! Теперь я уж не знаю, что и делать!

694

Нэнси внезапно пришла в голову одна идея.

— Вам кто-нибудь угрожал, Гарри? — спросила она. У таксиста глаза чуть не выскочили из орбит.

— Ну уж, — заявил он, — раз вы догадались, я, пожалуй, лучше расскажу вам всё, что знаю.

695

Он сообщил, что повёз пассажира, отвечающего описанию, которое дала Нэнси, к «Двум вязам», куда тот попросил его доставить.

— В тот самый момент, когда мы отъезжали, в мою машину вскочили ещё два человека. Они заявили, что едут в том же направлении, немного дальше, и просят меня захватить их с собой. Примерно на полпути к «Двум вязам» один из них велел мне съехать на обочину дороги и остановиться. Он сказал, что неизвестный им мужчина, который сел ко мне первым, потерял сознание. Он и его приятель выскочили из машины и уложили того пассажира на траву.

696

— Он был в самом деле очень болен? — спросила Нэнси.

697

— Я не знаю. Он был без сознания. И тут как раз подъехала ещё одна машина и остановилась позади нас. Водитель вышел и предложил отвезти вашего отца в больницу. Те двое согласились.

698

Нэнси немного приободрилась. Возможно, её отец в больнице, а вовсе не был похищен. Однако вскоре сердце её снова упало. Гарри сказал:

699

— Я заявил этим людям, что готов отвезти пассажира в больницу, но один из них повернулся ко мне, погрозил кулаком и заорал: «Ты лучше забудь обо всём происшедшем, а то как бы не было худо тебе и твоим ребятишкам!»

700

— Ох! — воскликнула Нэнси, и на какую-то минуту все словно поплыло у неё перед глазами. Она ухватилась за ручку двери машины, чтобы не упасть.

701

Теперь уже не оставалось никаких сомнений: её отца сначала с помощью наркотиков привели в бессознательное состояние, а потом похитили!

702

ГАЗЕТА НАВОДИТ НА СЛЕД

703

Мисс Скэйд подхватила Нэнси.

— Вам плохо? — быстро спросила медсестра.

704

— Да нет, это пройдёт, — ответила девушка. — Меня сильно потрясло то, что я услышала.

705

— Не могу ли я вам чем-нибудь помочь? Я с радостью это сделаю, — сказала женщина.

706

Большое спасибо, но думаю, что вы ничем мне не поможете, — Грустно улыбнувшись, Нэнси добавила: — Но мне надо что-то срочно предпринять.

707

Сестра высказала предположение, что мистер Дру находится в одной из местных больниц, и сообщила девушке названия трёх из них.

708

— Я сейчас же свяжусь с ними, — сказала Нэнси. — Вы очень добры. Вон ваш поезд подходит, мисс Скэйд. До свидания, и ещё раз огромное спасибо за вашу помощь.

709

Гарри вылез из своей машины и вышел на платформу зазывать к себе пассажиров. Нэнси поспешила за ним и прежде чем поезд подошёл, успела попросить его описать внешность двух мужчин, находившихся в машине с её отцом.

710

— Оба были брюнеты довольно-таки атлетического сложения. Красивыми я бы их не назвал. У одного из них не хватало зуба в верхней челюсти. А у второго левое ухо было как-то свёрнуто на сторону — не знаю, понятно ли я выражаюсь?

711

— Я понимаю, — сказала Нэнси. — Я передам описание их внешности в полицию.

712

Она снова направилась в телефонную будку и обзвонила все три больницы, осведомляясь, не поступил ли к ним больной по имени Карсон Дру или какой-либо пациент, находящийся без сознания, фамилию которого они не знают. Только в больнице «Милосердие» был пациент, находившийся со вчерашнего дня без сознания. Но это явно не был мистер Дру — это

713

Полностью уверившись в том, что её отца держат в каком-то тайном убежище, Нэнси отправилась в полицию и рассказала историю, услышанную от таксиста.

714

Капитан Росслэнд сильно встревожился.

— Это внушает серьёзное беспокойство, мисс Дру, — сказал он, — но я не сомневаюсь, что нам удастся выследить этого Малого с расплющенным ухом, и мы заставим его сказать, где находится ваш отец. А вот можете ли вы что-нибудь сделать — в этом я сомневаюсь. Лучше предоставьте все полиции.

715

Нэнси промолчала. Она не оставляла попыток что-либо сделать, но подчинилась.

716

— А пока что, — сказал капитан, — я советую вам остаться в «Двух вязах» и сосредоточиться на разгадке тамошней тайны. Судя по тому, что вы рассказали мне о своём отце, я уверен — он сам сможет выпутаться из затруднительного положения ещё до того, как его разыщет полиция.

717

Вслух Нэнси пообещала быть на месте и явиться в полицию, если она понадобится капитану Росслэнду. Однако про себя она решила: если только появится какая-то ниточка указывающая, где может находиться её отец, она непременно ею воспользуется.

718

Выйдя из полицейского участка, Нэнси двинулась по улице, глубоко погружённая в свои мысли. «Вместо того чтобы идти на лад, дела у меня, по всей видимости, идут всё хуже и хуже. Пожалуй, мне надо позвонить Ханне».

719

С детских лет Нэнси привыкла искать утешения в беседах с Ханной, которая всегда умудрялась давать ей очень полезные советы.

720

Нэнси зашла в ближайшую аптеку, где имелся телефон-автомат. Она набрала номер их домашнего телефона и очень обрадовалась, когда услышала в трубке голос Ханны.

Та пришла в ужас, узнав от Нэнси последние новости, но нашла, что капитан Росслэнд дал ей здравый совет.

721

— Ты сообщила полиции бесценные улики, и я думаю, что больше ты ничего сделать не можешь. Но погоди-ка минутку, — вдруг прервала она сама себя. — На твоём месте, Нэнси, я бы позвонила юристам из управления железной дороги и рассказала бы им подробно всё, что произошло. Исчезновение твоего отца непосредственно связано с их проектом строительства моста — я в этом уверена, — и у юристов, возможно, есть какие-нибудь соображения насчёт того, где его можно найти.

722

— Это — прекрасная мысль, Ханна. Я немедленно позвоню им, — сказала Нэнси.

723

Однако, когда она позвонила, к её огорчению выяснилось, что все юристы ушли и вернутся только после ленча, то есть часа в два.

724

— Ах ты, незадача какая! — вздохнула Нэнси. — Ну что ж, пожалуй, в ожидании их возвращения я тоже немножко перекушу. — Правда, она была так взволнована, что есть ей совсем не хотелось.

725

В дальнем углу аптеки была стойка, где можно было что-нибудь съесть, и Нэнси направилась туда. Взгромоздившись на высокий табурет, она несколько раз пробежала глазами меню. Ни одно блюдо не вызывало у неё аппетита. Когда продавец, стоявший за стойкой, спросил её, что ей угодно, Нэнси откровенно призналась, что она и сама не знает — есть что-то не хочется.

726

— Тогда я порекомендую вам гороховый суп, — сказал он. — Это суп домашнего приготовления и вкусен необыкновенно.

Нэнси улыбнулась ему.

— Ну что ж, последую вашему совету, попробую суп.

727

Гороховый суп действительно оказался восхитительным. К тому времени, когда Нэнси с ним покончила, настроение у неё заметно поднялось.

728

— А как насчёт пирога с заварным кремом, — спросил продавец. — Точно такой, бывало, готовила моя мать. — Хорошо, — согласилась Нэнси, улыбаясь заботливому молодому человеку. Пирог оказался необыкновенно вкусным.

Покончив с ним, Нэнси взглянула на часы. Было всего лишь половина второго. Увидев газетный киоск, она решила провести остаток времени за чтением у себя в машине.

729

Она купила журнал детективных рассказов, и один из этих рассказов оказался таким занимательным, что полчаса пролетели совсем незаметно. Ровно в два Нэнси вернулась в телефонную будку и позвонила в юридический отдел железной дороги. Оператор коммутатора соединил её с мистером Антони Баррадэйлом, и Нэнси догадалась по его голосу, что это ещё довольно молодой человек. Она быстро изложила ему свою историю.

730

— Мистера Дру держат в плену! — вскричал мистер Баррадэйл. — Я вижу, эти бесстыжие земельные собственники готовы на все ради того, чтобы выколотить несколько лишних долларов!

731

— Над этим делом работает полиция, но я подумала, что, может, и ваша фирма захочет принять участие, — сказала Нэнси юристу.

732

— Вне всякого сомнения! — заявил молодой человек. — Я поговорю об этом с главным партнёром фирмы. Я знаю, что он захочет немедленно приступить к работе над этой загадкой.

733

— Благодарю вас, — сказала Нэнси. Она продиктовала адрес и номер телефона «Двух вязов» и попросила дать ей знать, если у юристов появятся какие-то новости.

734

— Обязательно, — пообещал мистер Баррадэйл.

735

Нэнси вышла из аптеки и снова села в свою машину, раздумывая, что бы ей следовало теперь предпринять.

736

«Несомненно одно, — думала она. — Активная работа — лучшее средство от волнений. Вернусь в „Два вяза“ и продолжу там сыскную деятельность».

737

По дороге Нэнси размышляла о том, как это призрак входит в дом по подземной лестнице. Поскольку на территории поместья она никаких следов такой лестницы не нашла, ей пришло в голову, что лестница ведёт начало из какой-нибудь пещеры — естественной или вырытой человеком. Архитектор мог бы найти хорошее применение такому устройству. Выбрав дорогу, идущую вдоль поместья, по которой Мало кто ездил, Нэнси вспомнила, что она видела довольно Минный поросший травой взгорок, который, по её мнению, скрывал в себе старый высохший канал или трубу. Может это и был тайный вход в «Два вяза»?! Она остановила машину у края дороги и вооружилась фонариком. Предвкушая ответ на мучавшую её загадку Нэнси пересекла поле. Подойдя поближе к бугру, она увидела наваленные там груды камней. Сделав ещё несколько шагов вперёд, она убедилась, что это — действительно вход в каменистую пещеру.

738

«Ну что ж, может, на этот раз я нашла то, что нужно!» — подумала она, торопливо продвигаясь вперёд.

739

Дул сильный ветер, трепавший её волосы. Вдруг особенно резкий порыв ветра выдул из расселины между камнями какую-то старую газету, разметав вокруг отдельные страницы. Нэнси пришла в ещё большее волнение. Присутствие газеты указывало на то, что не так давно здесь побывал человек. Ветром прибило к её ногам первую страницу. Схватив её, она, к своему изумлению, убедилась, что это «Ривер-Хайтс газет» — газета, выходящая в её родном городе. Датирована она была вторником.

740

— Кто-то, интересующийся Ривер-Хайтс, был здесь совсем недавно! — взволнованно сказала себе юная сыщица. Кто это мог быть? Её отец? Гомбер? Кто? «Не содержатся ли в газете ещё какие-нибудь указания, могущие навести на след?» — подумала она и бросилась собирать остальные страницы. Разложив их все на земле, она заметила дырку на той странице, где публиковались различные объявления.

741

«Это может оказаться очень важным ключом к разгадке тайны, — подумала Нэнси. — Как только вернусь домой, позвоню Ханне и попрошу её просмотреть газету за вторник, чтобы выяснить, что было в том объявлении».

742

Внезапно ей пришло в голову, что человек, принёсший газету в пещеру, возможно, в этот самый момент находится там, внутри. Надо ей быть поосторожнее; может быть, это — враг! «Возможно также, — думала Нэнси, — это то самое место, где держат в плену папу?»

743

Зажав в руке фонарик и внимательно оглядываясь по сторонам, Нэнси осторожно начала углубляться в пещеру. Пять футов пройдено. Десять. Никого. Ещё пятнадцать. Двадцать. И тут Нэнси упёрлась в тупик. Пустая пещера была почти правильной круглой формы и другого отверстия не имела.

744

«Ах ты, Боже мой, опять неудача! — разочарованно подумала Нэнси, возвращаясь назад, к входу. — Теперь у меня одна надежда — узнать что-нибудь важное из газетного объявления».

745

Нэнси пошла назад через поле. Глаза её смотрели под ноги, так как она машинально выискивала следы. Но вдруг она подняла голову и не поверила собственным глазам.

746

Около её машины стоял какой-то мужчина и внимательно её разглядывал. Он стоял спиной к Нэнси, поэтому как следует разглядеть его лицо она не могла. Но сложения он был атлетического, а левое ухо у него было явно расплющенное.

747

ОБВАЛ

748

Незнакомец, осматривавший машину Нэнси, вероятно, услышал её шаги. Не оборачиваясь, он отскочил от автомобиля и кинулся через поле в противоположном направлении.

749

«Ведёт он себя явно подозрительно. Это, вероятно, и есть тот человек с расплющенным ухом, который участвовал в похищении моего отца», — взволнованно думала Нэнси.

750

Она быстро перешла через дорогу и со всех ног побежала за ним в надежде догнать его. Но расстояние между ними было слишком велико. К тому же, его шаги были намного шире шагов Нэнси, и он успевал за одну и ту же единицу времени пробежать гораздо дальше, чем она. Поле кончилось возле улицы, на которой стоял дом «Речной пейзаж». Выбежав на шоссе, Нэнси успела заметить, как незнакомец прыгнул в стоявший возле дома автомобиль и уехал.

751

Нэнси была в отчаянии. Она успела увидеть этого человека только в профиль. Эх, если бы ей удалось увидеть его анфас или заметить номер его машины!

752

— Интересно, тот ли это человек, что бросил около пещеры газету? — спрашивала себя Нэнси. — Может быть, он из Ривер-Хайтс? — Она решила, что сам мужчина не был одним из земельных собственников, но его, возможно, нанял Вилли Уортон или кто-либо из собственников, чтобы он помог похитить мистера Дру.

753

«Надо, пожалуй, поскорее позвонить в полицию и рассказать об этом», — подумала Нэнси.

754

Всю дорогу через поле она пробежала бегом, поспешно уселась в свою машину, развернула её и покатила к «Двум вязам». Сразу же по прибытии она кинулась к телефону и позвонила начальнику Клифвудской полиции. Через минуту она уже говорила с капитаном и сообщала ему новейшую информацию.

755

— Да, похоже, вы напали на верный след, мисс Дру, — заметил капитан. — Я сейчас распоряжусь, чтобы этого человека схватили.

756

— О моём отце, вероятно, никаких новостей? — спросила Нэнси.

757

— К сожалению. Но два моих полицейских разговаривали с таксистом Гарри, и он дал им довольно подробное описание человека, который появился на дороге в тот момент, когда ваш отец лежал без сознания на траве, и который предложил отвезти его в больницу.

758

— Ну и как он выглядел?

759

Капитан ответил: лет около пятидесяти, невысокий и довольно коренастый. У него бегающие светлые глаза.

760

— Ну что ж, я могу назвать несколько человек, отвечающих этому описанию. Не было ли у него каких-либо характерных особенностей?

761

— Гарри ничего не заметил — разве что руки у этого человека выглядели так, будто он никогда не занимался физическим трудом. Таксист сказал, что они были какие-то мягкие и пухлые.

762

— В таком случае ни один из известных мне низкорослых коренастых мужчин со светлыми глазами не подходит. Ни у одного из них нет таких рук.

763

— Значит, для опознания эта деталь будет важна, — заметил капитан. — А теперь я, пожалуй, подам сигнал к поимке того человека, о котором вы мне рассказали.

764

Нэнси попрощалась и повесила трубку. Подождав несколько секунд, она снова позвонила по телефону — на этот раз Ханне Груин. Перед собой она разложила газетную страницу, из которой было вырвано рекламное объявление.

765

— Дом мистера Дру, — послышался голос в трубке.

766

— Алло, Ханна! Это — Нэнси.

767

— Здравствуй! Как ты, дорогая? Какие новости? — быстро забросала её вопросами Ханна.

768

— Я пока ещё не нашла папу, — ответила девушка. — И полиция тоже ещё не нашла. Но я набрела на кое-какие следы.

769

— Расскажи мне! — взволнованно попросила Ханна. Нэнси рассказала ей о человеке с расплющенным ухом и выразила уверенность, что полиция скоро его поймает.

— Если он согласится говорить, мы сможем узнать, где содержат папу.

770

— Ах, я так надеюсь! — вздохнула Ханна. — Не падай духом, Нэнси.

771

В этот момент в холл вошла Эллен и, проходя мимо Нэнси к лестнице, улыбнулась подруге. Нэнси только было собралась попросить Ханну достать номер газеты «Ривер-Хайтс газет» за вторник, как сверху послышался грохот. Она тут же решила, что призрак наверняка снова принялся за работу.

772

— Ханна, я позвоню тебе попозже, — сказала она и положила трубку.

773

Не успела она это сделать, как услышала крик Эллен:

— Нэнси, беги! Потолок! — Сама она кинулась к входной двери.

774

Нэнси, взглянув наверх, увидела колоссальную трещину в потолке прямо над их головами. В следующее мгновение на них обрушился весь потолок. Обе они оказались на полу.

775

— Ох! — простонала Эллен. Вся она была засыпана дранкой и штукатуркой; кроме того, что-то больно ударило её по голове. Однако у неё хватило сил крикнуть из-под обломков: — . Нэнси, как ты? Не пострадала? — Ответа не последовало.

776

На оглушительный шум из кухни прибежали мисс Флора и тётя Розмари. Они в ужасе уставились на представившуюся их взорам картину. Нэнси лежала без сознания, а Эллен, по-видимому, была так оглушена, что не могла шевельнуться!

777

— О Боже! О Боже! — воскликнула мисс Флора.

778

Она и тётя Розмари начали перешагивать через кучи дранки и штукатурки, пыль от которых заполнила все помещение. Они неудержимо чихали, но всё же продвигались вперёд.

779

Мисс Флора, добравшись до Эллен, начала оттаскивать в сторону куски штукатурки и дранки. Наконец она помогла своей внучке подняться на ноги.

780

— Ах ты, батюшки, тебя ранило! — причитала она.

781

— Я приду… в себя… через минуту, — говорила Эллен, задыхаясь от пыли, — а вот Нэнси…

782

Тётя Розмари уже приблизилась к девушке, лежавшей без сознания. С молниеносной быстротой она расшвыряла обломки, которые почти погребли под собой Нэнси. Вытащив из кармана носовой платок, она осторожно прикрыла им лицо девушки, с тем чтобы она не вдыхала больше стоявшую в воздухе пыль.

783

— Эллен, хватит ли у тебя сил помочь мне перенести Нэнси в библиотеку? — спросила она. — Мне бы хотелось уложить её там на диван.

784

— Ну, конечно, тётя Розмари. Вы думаете Нэнси очень сильно пострадала? — с тревогой спросила она.

785

— Надеюсь, что нет.

786

В этот момент Нэнси зашевелилась. Потом её рука двинулась вверх, и она сняла со своего лица платок. Она начала моргать глазами, словно бы силясь вспомнить, где она находится.

787

— Всё пройдёт, Нэнси, — ласково сказала тётя Розмари. — Но я не хочу, чтобы ты дышала этой пылью. Пожалуйста, приложи к носу платок. — Она взяла платок из рук девушки и снова прикрыла им её ноздри и губы.

788

Через минуту Нэнси слабо улыбнулась.

— Теперь я все вспомнила. Потолок обвалился.

789

— Да, — сказала Эллен. — Ты на несколько минут потеряла сознание. Надеюсь, что ты не ранена?

790

Мисс Флора, которая всё ещё продолжала отчаянно чихать, настаивала, чтобы они все немедленно выбрались из этой пылищи. С помощью Эллен она начала шагать через кучи обломков. Когда они подошли к дверям библиотеки, старая женщина вошла в комнату.

791

Эллен вернулась помочь Нэнси. Но к этому времени её подруга уже стояла на ногах, опираясь на руку тёти Розмари. Она смогла самостоятельно пройти через холл до библиотеки.

Тётя Розмари предложила позвать врача, но Нэнси заявила что в этом нет никакой необходимости. — До чего же я счастлива, что вы, девушки, серьёзно не пострадали, — заявила мисс Флора. — Какой ужас! Как по-вашему, это — дело рук призрака?

792

Дочь её ответила немедленно:

— Нет. Вряд ли. Мама, ты ведь помнишь, что уже довольно давно всякий раз, когда шёл дождь, у нас в холле протекало. А в прошлый раз, когда была буря, весь потолок промок насквозь. Я думаю, что штукатурка от этого ослабла, и потолок обвалился сам собой.

793

Мисс Флора заметила, что построить новый потолок обойдётся им очень дорого. Ах ты батюшки, неприятности так и сыплются, и всё-таки я не хочу расставаться со своим домом.

794

Нэнси, к которой уже полностью вернулось самообладание, сказала с лёгкой улыбкой:

— Ну что ж, мисс Флора, теперь по крайней мере у вас станет одной заботой меньше.

795

— Ты это о чём?

796

— О мистере Гомбере, — сказала Нэнси. — Он, возможно, уже не будет так заинтересован в том, чтобы приобрести ваш дом, когда увидит, что произошло.

797

— Ну, не знаю, — возразила тётя Розмари. — Он такой настойчивый…

798

Нэнси заявила, что чувствует себя сейчас хорошо, и вызвалась вместе с Эллен начать приводить в порядок холл.

799

Мисс Флора и слышать об этом не хотела. Она твёрдо заявила, что они с тётей Розмари обязательно будут помогать.

800

Из погреба принесли картонные коробки. Одна за другой они заполнялись обломками. После того как их вынесли из дома, в ход пошли швабры и пыльные тряпки. За один час вся пыль от штукатурки была убрана.

801

Усталые труженицы только что закончили свою работу, как зазвонил телефон. Нэнси, стоявшая ближе всех к аппарату, сняла трубку. Звонила Ханна Груин.

802

— Нэнси! Что случилось? — спросила она. — Я уже больше часа жду твоего звонка. В чём дело?

803

Нэнси подробно рассказала ей о случившемся,

804

— Боже! Что теперь на вас свалится? — воскликнула она. Нэнси засмеялась.

805

— Надеюсь, что-нибудь приятное.

806

Она попросила Ханну посмотреть «Ривер-Хайтс газет» за вторник. Через несколько минут та принесла газету к телефону, и Нэнси попросила раскрыть её на четырнадцатой странице.

— Там есть объявления. Скажи мне, какое объявление Помещено в самом центре полосы?

807

— Ты имеешь в виду объявление о подержанных машинах?

808

— Да, вероятно, это — то самое объявление. В моём экземпляре оно отсутствует.

809

Ханна Груин сказала, что в нём даётся адрес продавца подержанных автомобилей Эйкена: Хэнкок, Мэйн-стрит дом номер 24.

810

— А теперь переверни страницу и скажи, что напечатано на обороте, — попросила Нэнси.

811

— Там просто рассказ о каком-то школьном пикнике, — ответила Ханна. — Может ли тебе пригодиться хоть одно из этих сообщений?

812

— Да, Ханна. Думаю, что я получила от тебя как раз ту информацию, которая была мне нужна. Она может оказаться весьма ценной. Большое спасибо.

813

Закончив разговор, Нэнси начала было набирать номер телефона полицейского участка, но потом передумала. Призрак, возможно, прячется где-то в доме и подслушивает, а если он установил в разных местах микрофоны, любые разговоры могут быть записаны даже на расстоянии.

814

— Я уверена, что будет гораздо лучше, если я обсужу весь этот вопрос с полицией лично, — решила она.

815

О том, куда она едет, она сообщила только Эллен, а остальным сказала лишь, что едет в центр города и скоро вернётся.

816

— А ты уверена, что у тебя достаточно для этого сил? — спросила тётя Розмари.

817

— Я себя чувствую совершенно нормально, — твёрдо заявила Нэнси,

818

Она выехала на своей машине по направлению к участку, в надежде, что с помощью адреса торговца подержанными автомобилями полиции удастся узнать хотя бы имя кого-либо из подозреваемых.

819

— Они могут его выследить, а через него установить, где находится мой отец.

820

СРОЧНОЕ СООБЩЕНИЕ

821

— Отличной — воскликнул капитан Росслэнд, выслушав рассказ Нэнси. Он улыбнулся. — Вы так успешно раскапываете улики, что, будь вы моим подчинённым, я бы представил вас к награде!

822

Юная сыщица, улыбнувшись, поблагодарила его.

— Я должна найти моего отца, — сказала она с чувством.

823

— Я сейчас же позвоню капитану Макгиннису в Ривер-Хайтс, — заявил капитан Росслэнд. — Может, вы посидите и подождёте здесь? Им понадобится не так много времени, чтобы получить информацию о заведении Эйкена.

824

Нэнси согласилась и уселась в уголке кабинета капитана, очень скоро он обратился к ней. и Я получил ответ, мисс Дру.

825

Она вскочила и подошла к его столу. Он сказал, что капитан Макгиннис в Ривер-Хайтс очень охотно взялся за дело Он сразу же послал двоих полицейских в заведение Эйкена. Они только что вернулись и доложили, что позавчера атлетического вида мужчина с расплющенным ухом явился туда и купил машину. Он предъявил водительские права на имя Сэмюэла Гринмэна из Хантсвилла.

826

Сообщение взволновало Нэнси,

— Тогда, выходит, его нетрудно поймать, не так ли?

827

— Боюсь, что не совсем так, — возразил капитан Росслэнд. — Макгиннис узнал от полиции Хантсвилла, что, хотя Гринмэн и числится проживающим по указанному им адресу, его уже некоторое время в городе нет.

828

— И что же — никто не знает, где он?

829

— Из его соседей никто не знает. Капитан сообщил также, что Сэмюэл Гринмэн — человек сомнительной репутации. Он разыскивается по обвинению в нескольких грабежах, и его поисками занимается полиция нескольких штатов.

830

— Но, если мужчина, которого я видела около своей машины, — Сэмюэл Гринмэн, он, возможно, скрывается где-то в этом районе.

831

Капитан Росслэнд улыбнулся:

— Может, следующим вашим предположением будет, что он и есть призрак, орудующий в «Двух вязах»?

832

— Кто знает! — отозвалась Нэнси,

833

— Во всяком случае, — заметил капитан, — ваша мысль насчёт того, что он, возможно, скрывается где-то поблизости, — весьма здравая.

834

Нэнси собиралась задать полицейскому ещё один вопрос, но в этот момент зазвонил телефон. Капитан протянул трубку ей. — Просят вас, мисс Дру.

835

Девушка взяла трубку и сказала:

— Алло! — Звонила Эллен, и голос её был полон отчаяния.

836

— Ах, Нэнси, здесь произошло нечто ужасное. Тебе необходимо сейчас же вернуться.

837

— Что случилось? — крикнула Нэнси, но на другом конце уже повесили трубку.

838

Нэнси сообщила капитану Росслэнду о срочном вызове и сказала, что должна немедленно уйти.

839

— Дайте мне знать, если понадобится помощь полиции, — крикнул он ей вдогонку.

840

— Спасибо. Обязательно!

841

Нэнси мчалась к «Двум вязам» на максимальной разрешённой скорости. Подъехав к дому, она с удивлением увидела машину врача. Кто-то заболел!

842

Эллен встретила подругу у входной двери.

— Нэнси, — сказала она шёпотом, — у мисс Флоры произошёл сердечный приступ.

843

— Ужас какой! — воскликнула Нэнси. — Расскажи мне подробнее, что случилось.

844

— Доктор Моррисом хочет, чтобы мисс Флора немедленно легла в больницу, но она отказывается. Говорит, никуда отсюда не уедет.

845

Эллен сказала, что врач все ещё находится наверху, у постели её прабабушки.

846

— Когда ей стало плохо? — спросила Нэнси. — Был ли сердечный приступ вызван каким-либо событием? Эллен кивнула.

847

— Да. Это было очень страшно. Мисс Флора, тётя Розмари и я находились в кухне и говорили о том, что приготовить на ужин. Им хотелось придумать какое-нибудь особенное блюдо, чтобы порадовать тебя, так как они знали, что ты очень расстроена.

848

— Это было очень мило с их стороны, — заметила Нэнси. — Ну, дальше.

849

— Мисс Флора почувствовала себя утомлённой, и тётя Розмари посоветовала ей пойти наверх и лечь. Она только начала подниматься по лестнице, когда вдруг, неизвестно почему, оглянулась назад, Там, в гостиной, стоял какой-то мужчина!

850

— Посетитель? — спросила Нэнси.

851

— Да нет! — ответила Эллен. — Мисс Флора сказала, что это был безобразный, просто ужасный на вид человек. Он был небрит, и у него были длинные волосы.

852

— Ты думаешь, это был призрак? — спросила Нэнси.

853

— Мисс Флора решила, что да. Она не крикнула. Ты ведь знаешь, до чего она храбрая. Она попросту решила спуститься вниз и сама заговорить с ним. И, как ты думаешь, что тут произошло?

— Ну как я могу догадаться? Скажи мне.

854

Эллен сказала, что, когда мисс Флора дошла до гостиной, там никого не оказалось. И при этом не было какой-либо открытой потайной двери.

855

— Ну и что мисс Флора сделала дальше?

856

— Упала в обморок.

857

В этот момент в холл спустился высокий, стройный седоголовый человек с медицинским саквояжем в руках. Эллен представила ему Нэнси и осведомилась о состоянии больной.

858

— К счастью, можно быть уверенным, что мисс Флора поправится, — сказал доктор Моррисом. — Это — удивительная женщина. Если ей будет обеспечен полный отдых и ничто больше её не встревожит, я думаю, все с ней будет в порядке. Пожалуй, завтра она сможет уже ненадолго подниматься с постели.

859

— Ах, слава Богу! — воскликнула Эллен. — Я страшно люблю прабабушку и не хочу, чтобы с ней что-нибудь случилось.

860

Врач улыбнулся.

Я сделаю все, что могу, но вы должны мне помочь.

861

А что для этого нужно? — быстро спросила Нэнси.

862

Врач сказал, что не следует вести никаких разговоров о призраке.

— Мисс Флора утверждает, что видела в гостиной какого-то человека, который наверняка проник туда через какой-то потайной вход. Но ведь вы знаете так же хорошо, как и я, что этого просто не может быть.

863

— Однако никаким иным путём тот человек проникнуть в дом не мог, — возразила Эллен. — Все двери и окна на этом этаже заперты.

864

Врач поднял брови.

— Вы слыхали о галлюцинациях? — спросил он.

865

Нэнси и Эллен нахмурились, но промолчали. Они были уверены, что никаких галлюцинаций у мисс Флоры не было. Если она сказала, что в гостиной кто-то был, значит, кто-то там был!

866

— Если я понадоблюсь вам раньше завтрашнего утра, позвоните мне, — сказал доктор, направляясь к парадному. — Если вы не позвоните, я загляну к вам до двенадцати дня.

867

После ухода врача девушки переглянулись. Нэнси сказала:

— Ты согласна ещё раз обыскать гостиную?

868

— Ещё бы! — с готовностью откликнулась Эллен. — Сейчас начнём или после ужина?

869

Хотя Нэнси не терпелось начать, не откладывая, она подумала, что ей следует сначала подняться наверх и выразить своё сочувствие мисс Флоре. Кроме того, задержка с ужином, вызванная их новыми поисками, могла плохо подействовать на больную. Эллен предложила немедленно пойти в кухню и начать готовить ужин. Нэнси кивнула и пошла вверх по лестнице.

870

Чтобы избежать новых пугающих встреч с призраком, мисс Флору уложили в постель в комнате её дочери: похоже было, что призрак избрал главным местом своей «деятельности» спальню мисс Флоры.

871

— Мисс Флора, как мне жаль, что вам приходится лежать в постели! — сказала Нэнси, с улыбкой подойдя к постели больной.

872

— Да, мне тоже жаль! — ответствовала та. — И я считаю, что всё это — сплошной вздор. Каждый может разок-другой упасть в обморок.

873

Мама! — умоляющим голосом обратилась к ней тётя Розмари, сидевшая в кресле по другую сторону постели. — Ты же слышала, что доктор сказал.

874

— Ох уж, эти доктора! — раздражённо воскликнула её мать. — Так или иначе, Нэнси, я уверена, что видела призрак. Теперь тебе остаётся только искать мужчину, который не брился бог знает сколько времени, у которого безобразное лицо и непомерно длинные волосы.

875

Нэнси очень хотелось расспросить насчёт роста незнакомца, но, вспомнив предупреждение врача, она воздержалась. Вместо этого, улыбнувшись и взяв мисс Флору за руку, она сказала:

876

— Давайте больше не будем говорить об этом, пока вы не поправитесь. Тогда я включу вас в детективный отряд «Дру и компания».

877

Старая женщина улыбнулась и пообещала попробовать отдохнуть.

878

— Но сначала я хотела бы поесть, — заявила она. — Как вы, девушки, одни справитесь? Мне бы хотелось, чтобы Розмари осталась здесь со мной.

879

— Конечно, справимся, и мы принесём вам как раз такую еду, какая вам требуется как больной.

880

Нэнси сошла вниз и приготовила поднос для мисс Флоры: чашку горячего куриного бульона, тоненький ломтик поджаренного хлеба и блюдечко с фруктовым желе.

881

Спустя несколько минут Эллен доставила наверх другой поднос с более плотной едой для тёти Розмари. После этого обе девушки сами уселись ужинать в столовой. Покончив с едой, они быстро вымыли посуду и направились в гостиную.

882

— Где, ты думаешь, надо смотреть? — спросила шёпотом Эллен.

883

Последние полчаса Нэнси перебирала в уме, какое местечко в гостиной они могли проглядеть — то самое, за которым, быть может, скрывается тайный вход. Она решила, что надо проверить большую горку, встроенную в стену. Там хранилась прекрасная коллекция всевозможных статуэток, сувениров из разных стран и всяческие безделушки.

884

— Я поищу скрытую пружину, с помощью которой горка, возможно, отделяется от стены, — тихо сказала Нэнси.

885

Она впервые заметила, что каждая статуэтка и безделушка стоит в специальном углублении на полке.«Уж не для того ли это сделано, — взволнованно подумала она, — чтобы статуэтки не упали, когда горка начнёт передвигаться?»

886

Она энергично принялась искать внутри горки скрытую пружину. Вместе с Эллен они тщательно обследовали каждый дюйм верхней части горки, но не нашли пружины, которая могла бы сдвинуть с места этот большой встроенный в стену предмет.

887

В нижней части шкафа имелось две дверцы, которые Я ней уже не раз открывала. Но тогда она искала глазами и большое отверстие, а теперь надеялась обнаружить маленькую пружину или передвижную панель.

888

Эллен обследовала левую сторону, Нэнси — правую. Вдруг сердце её учащённо забилось. Она нащупала точку, несколько выступавшую кверху. Она стала водить пальцами взад-вперёд по пространству, составлявшему полдюйма в высоту и три дюйма в длину.

889

«Здесь что-то может скрываться», — пронеслось у неё в голове, и она осторожно стала надавливать на дерево.

890

Вдруг она почувствовала, что вся горка начала вибрировать.

891

— Эллен! Я что-то нашла! — хриплым шёпотом сказала она. — Ты лучше отойди назад.

892

Нэнси надавила сильнее. На этот раз правая сторона горки начала двигаться вперёд. Нэнси вскочила с колен и, отступив назад, остановилась рядом с Эллен. Медленно, очень медленно, одна сторона горки начала двигаться внутрь гостиной, а другая — в полое пространство позади неё.

893

Эллен в испуге схватила Нэнси за руку. Что-то они найдут в потайном проходе?

894

НОВЫЙ ПОДОЗРЕВАЕМЫЙ

895

Узкий коридор позади горки освещала большая хрустальная люстра. Коридор был не очень длинным. В нём никого не было; всюду было полно пыли и паутины.

896

— Наверное, на противоположном конце находится выход, — сказала Нэнси. — Давай посмотрим, куда этот проход ведёт.

897

— Пожалуй, я лучше подожду здесь, Нэнси, сказала Эллен. — Эта старая горка, может, вдруг сама собой начнёт закрываться, и если это произойдёт, я закричу, чтобы ты могла вовремя выбраться оттуда.

898

Нэнси засмеялась.

— Хороший ты товарищ, Эллен!

899

Шагая по переходу, Нэнси внимательно вглядывалась в стены по обеим его сторонам. Никакого выхода ни в одной из прочных, оштукатуренных стен видно не было. Дальний конец коридора тоже был прочным, но он был деревянный.

900

Нэнси подумала, что это, наверное, неспроста. В чём тут дело, она пока что не понимала и решила вернуться назад, в гостиную. На полдороге она увидела на полу сложенный листок бумаги.

901

«А ну-ка, посмотрим, может, там что-нибудь интересное», — подумала девушка, поднимая бумажку с пола.

902

В тот самый момент, когда Нэнси вошла в гостиную, в двери оказалась тётя Розмари. Она удивлённо взирала на отверстие в стене и на горку, повёрнутую к ней под прямым углом.

903

— Нашли что-нибудь? — спросила она.

904

— Только вот это, — ответила Нэнси, передавая тёте Розмари сложенную бумажку.

905

Миссис Хэйз развернула её и сказала заглядывавшим через её плечо девушкам:

— Это — неоконченное письмо. — Потом она начала разбирать старомодный почерк. — А вы знаете, что это написано в 1785 году — вскоре после того, как был построен этот дом?

906

В письме говорилось:

907

«Достопочтенный друг Бенджамин!

908

Я только что узнал о вероломстве двоих моих слуг. Боюсь, что они собираются нанести ущерб тому делу, за которое борются колонии. Я прикажу их примерно наказать. Об их неверности я, к счастью, узнал, когда находился на специальном пункте прослушивания. Я могу слышать каждое слово, сказанное в помещении для слуг.

909

Буду следить за дальнейшими…»

910

На этом письмо обрывалось. Эллен тут же повторила слова «Пункт прослушивания»?

911

— Он, наверное, находится в конце этого перехода, — предположила Нэнси. — Тётя Розмари, какая комната граничит с тем отрезком коридора?

912

— Я думаю, кухня, — ответила миссис Хэйз. — Мне кажется, я даже слышала когда-то, что нынешняя кухня была в старину «людской» — комнатой для прислуги. Вы, наверное, помните, что в колониальные времена еду никогда не готовили в самом доме. Она всегда приготовлялась в другом помещении и доставлялась в дом на больших подносах.

913

Эллен улыбнулась.

— Когда тут был пункт для подслушивания, бедные слуги были лишены всякой возможности поболтать по душам. Все их разговоры всегда становились известны хозяину!

914

Нэнси и тётя Розмари тоже улыбнулись и кивнули в знак согласия.

— Давайте проверим, действует ли ещё этот пункт подслушивания, — предложила юная сыщица.

915

Договорились, что Эллен пойдёт в кухню и начнёт там разговаривать. Нэнси будет стоять в конце коридора и слушать, тётя Розмари, которой показали, как приводить в действие скрытую пружину, управляющую перемещением горки, взяла на себя обязанности стража на тот случай, если этот громадный шкаф вдруг придёт в движение и закроет отверстие.

916

— Ну, все готовы? — спросила Эллен и вышла из комнаты.

917

Когда она решила, что Нэнси, должно быть, уже заняла свой пост, она начала говорить о своей предстоящей свадьба и попросила Нэнси быть её подружкой на церемонии.

918

— Я слышу Эллен совершенно отчётливо, — взволнован но крикнула Нэнси, обращаясь к тёте Розмари. — Пункт подслушивания в полном порядке!

919

После того как испытания закончились и Нэнси вернула горку на прежнее место, между нею, Эллен и тётей Розмари состоялось коротенькое совещание. Говорили шёпотом. Все пришли к выводу, что призрак знал про переход и подслушивал планы, которые строили обитательницы дома. Вероятно сюда он и скрылся после того, как его заметила мисс Флора…

920

— Забавно, но мы именно в кухне говорим о своих планах больше чем в какой-либо другой комнате, — заметила тётя Розмари.

921

Эллен сказала:

— Интересно, имелся ли такой пункт подслушивания только в «Двух вязах», был ли он уникальным сооружением, придуманным владельцем и строителем дома?

922

— Конечно, нет! — ответила тётя Розмари. — Такие места имелись во многих старых домах, где держали слуг, Не забывайте, что наша страна участвовала в нескольких войнах, во время которых изменники и шпионы легко собирали нужную информацию, выдавая себя за слуг.

923

— Ловко придумано! — заметила Эллен. — И ведь, наверное, многие из тех, кто был изобличён, так никогда и не узнали, каким образом их разоблачили.

924

— Без сомнения, — подтвердила тётя Розмари.

925

В этот момент они услышали слабый голос мисс Флоры, доносившийся из спальни, и поспешили наверх, узнать, все ли у неё в порядке. Она встретила их улыбкой, но пожаловалась, что ей неприятно надолго оставаться в одиночестве.

926

— Сегодня вечером, мама, я больше не отойду от тебя, — пообещала тётя Розмари. — Я буду спать в этой комнате на диване, чтобы не мешать тебе. А теперь попытайся немного соснуть.

927

На следующее утро Нэнси позвонила Ханна Груин, голос которой звучал очень гневно.

— Нэнси, я только что разговаривала с мистером Баррадэйлом, юристом из железнодорожного управления. Он потерял твой адрес и номер телефона и поэтому позвонил сюда. То, что он мне сказал, меня просто взбесило. Он намекнул, что твой отец, возможно, скрывается сознательно, из-за того, что не смог найти Вилли Уортона.

928

Нэнси тоже рассердилась.

— Но ведь это же страшно несправедливо и никак не соответствует действительности, — вскричала она.

929

— Я тебе прямо скажу, — заявила Ханна, — я бы на твоём месте этого не потерпела. И, к тому же, это ещё далеко не все.

930

— Что ты имеешь в виду? Он ещё что-нибудь сказал о папе?

931

— Нет, дело не в этом, — ответила Ханна. — Он позвонил, бы сообщить, что железная дорога больше не может поддерживать проект строительства моста. Если до понедельника не будут представлены какие-либо новые доказательства, железная дорога будет вынуждена согласиться на требования Вилли Уортона и всех прочих земельных собственников!

932

— Ах, это было бы большим ударом для папы! — сказала Нэнси. — Он бы не хотел, чтобы дело так повернулось. Он убеждён, что подпись на том документе о продаже участка действительно принадлежит Вилли Уортону. Единственное, что надо сделать, — это найти его и доказать, что подпись — его.

933

— Такая получилась неразбериха, — сказала Ханна. — Прежде чем позвонить тебе, я говорила с полицией. У них нет никаких указаний на то, где может находиться твой отец.

934

— Ханна, это просто ужасно! — воскликнула Нэнси. — Я ещё не знаю, как я это сделаю, но я твёрдо намерена найти папу, — и как можно скорее!

935

Закончив разговор по телефону, Нэнси начала расхаживать по холлу, пытаясь разработать план действий. Что-то необходимо предпринять!

936

Внезапно она подошла к парадной двери, открыла её и вышла на улицу. Глубоко вдохнув прекрасный утренний воздух, она направилась в сад. Девушка постаралась проникнуться красотой окружающей природы, прежде чем позволить себе вновь окунуться в сложное переплетение мучавших её проблем.

937

Мистер Дру давно когда-то учил Нэнси, что общение с природой — лучший способ, что называется, «прочистить мозги». Нэнси прошлась по одной тропинке, потом — по другой, прислушиваясь к щебетанию птиц и к доносившейся иногда из небесной выси песне жаворонка. Она вновь глубоко втянула в себя аромат роз и глициний, свисавших над осевшей беседкой.

938

Через десять минут она вернулась домой и уселась на ступеньках крыльца. Почти сразу же перед её мысленным взором предстал образ Натана Гомбера, причём с такой ясностью, как если бы он стоял перед ней. Она начала сопоставлять в уме различные факты, касавшиеся его и железнодорожной собственности.

939

«Может, это Натан Гомбер скрывает где-то Вилли Уорто-На1 — пришло ей в голову. — Вилли, возможно, сам — пленник. А если Гомбер — человек такого сорта, он вполне был способен похитить моего отца!»

940

Сама эта мысль испугала Нэнси. Вскочив, она решила попросить полицию организовать слежку за Натаном Гомбером.

941

«Я отправлюсь в участок и поговорю с капитаном Росслэндом, — решила она. — И я попрошу Эллен пойти со мной В доме сегодня уборщица, так что в случае необходимости она сможет помочь тёте Розмари».

942

Не объясняя истинную цель своей поездки в центр города, Нэнси просто попросила Эллен сопровождать её, чтобы произвести кое-какие покупки. Девушки отправились, и по дороге в город Нэнси изложила Эллен во всех подробностях свои новейшие соображения насчёт Натана Гомбера.

943

Эллен страшно удивилась.

— Подумать только, — ведь он делал вид, что так беспокоится о безопасности твоего отца!

944

Прибыв в участок, девушки вынуждены были немного подождать, прежде чем капитан Росслэнд их принял. Нэнси была раздосадована задержкой: каждая минута сейчас казалась ей драгоценной. Наконец девушек пригласили в кабинет, хозяин которого тепло их приветствовал.

945

— Ещё какой-нибудь ключ к тайне, мисс Дру? — с улыбкой спросил он.

946

Нэнси быстро изложила, в чём дело,

947

— Я думаю, вы на верном пути, — сказал капитан. — Я с удовольствием свяжусь с капитаном Макгиннисом в Ривер-Хайтс и передам ему ваши соображения. И кроме того, я велю всем сотрудникам нашего участка принять меры к розыску Натана Гомбера.

948

— Спасибо! — с чувством сказала Нэнси. — С каждым часом я все больше беспокоюсь об отце.

949

— Ничего, скоро мы добьёмся результата, — сказал капитан успокаивающим тоном, — Как только я что-нибудь узнаю, в ту же минуту поставлю вас в известность.

950

Нэнси поблагодарила его, и девушки удалились. Нэнси собрала все свои силы, чтобы не показать, что творится у неё в душе, Почти машинально она толкала перед собой тележку в универмаге, выбирая нужные продукты. Внутренний голос говорил ей: «Нам нужны банки зелёного горошка, потому что призрак забрал те, что у нас были». Около мясного прилавка она подумала: «Папа любит толстые сочные бифштексы».

951

Наконец закупки кончились, пакеты были уложены в машину. На обратном пути Эллен спросила у Нэнси, каковы её дальнейшие планы.

952

— По правде говоря, я всё время об этом думаю, но пока что никаких новых идей у меня не возникло, — призналась Нэнси. — Но я уверена, что какая-нибудь мысль родится.

953

Когда девушки находились уже недалеко от поместья «Два вяза», они увидели, как вдруг на подъездной дорожке показался автомобиль, свернувший куда-то вправо. Водитель высунулся из окошечка и оглянулся. На лице его застыла самодовольная улыбка.

954

— Да ведь это Натан Гомбер! — воскликнула Нэнси.

955

— А ты обратила внимание на эту ухмылку на его физиономии? — спросила Эллен. — Ох, Нэнси, может, она означала, что ему наконец удалось убедить мисс Флору продать ему дом?!

956

— Возможно, — угрюмо откликнулась Нэнси. — А кроме всего прочего я только что просила полицию установить за ним слежку, и сама же раньше всех его увидела!

957

С этими словами Нэнси прибавила скорость и пулей помчалась вперёд. Видя, что она проехала мимо дорожки, ведущей к поместью, Эллен спросила:

— Куда мы едем?

958

— Я намерена следовать за Натаном Гомбером до тех пор, пока не схвачу его, — ответила Нэнси.

959

ПРОДАНО!

960

— Ох, Нэнси, я надеюсь, мы встретим кого-нибудь из офицеров полиции, — сказала Эллен. — Если Гомбер похититель, он может попытаться причинить нам вред, коли нам удастся нагнать его.

961

— Нам надо соблюдать осторожность, — согласилась Нэнси. — Но боюсь, что никакого офицера полиции мы не встретим. За всё время, что я нахожусь здесь, я ни разу ни одного офицера на здешних дорогах не видела.

962

Обе девушки пристально следили за машиной, двигавшейся перед ними. Она находилась достаточно близко, чтобы Нэнси могла прочитать её номер. «Интересно, — подумала она, — зарегистрирована ли машина как собственность Гомбера или кого-то другого. Если она принадлежит кому-либо из его друзей, это может подсказать полиции фамилию ещё какого-то человека, внушающего подозрения».

963

— Куда, по-твоему, направляется Гомбер? — спросила Эллен. — Собирается с кем-нибудь встретиться?

964

— Возможно, а может, он возвращается в Ривер-Хайтс.

965

— Пока ещё нет, — заметила Эллен, ибо в этот момент Гомбер достиг перекрёстка и повернул сразу же направо. — Эта дорога ведёт в сторону от Ривер-Хайтс.

966

— Но зато она проходит мимо дома «Речной пейзаж», — ответила напряжённым голосом Нэнси, подъезжая к перекрёстку.

967

Повернув направо, девушки увидели впереди машину Гомбера, мчащуюся на огромной скорости. Он проехал мимо пустующего дома. Через некоторое время он начал включать и выключать свои фары.

968

— Зачем он это делает? — спросила Эллен. — Он что — просто проверяет фары?

969

Нэнси склонна была думать иначе.

— Я полагаю, он подаёт кому-то сигналы. Смотри вокруг себя, Эллен, — не увидишь ли ты кого-нибудь. — Сама она ехала с такой скоростью, что не решалась отвести глаза от дороги.

970

Эллен посмотрела направо, потом налево и наконец повернулась и стала смотреть сквозь заднее стекло.

— Не вижу нигде ни души, — сообщила она. Нэнси встревожилась. Возможно, Гомбер подавал кому-то сигнал последовать за их машиной.

— Эллен, продолжай смотреть сквозь заднее стекло не появится ли какая-нибудь машина, которая начнёт следовать за нами.

971

— Может, нам отказаться от погони и просто сообщить о Гомбере в полицию, — несколько испуганным голосом сказала Эллен.

972

Но Нэнси об этом и слышать не хотела.

— Я думаю, нам будет очень полезно узнать, куда он направляется, — сказала она. Девушка продолжала преследование и, проехав ещё несколько миль, подъехала к городу Хэнкок.

973

— Не здесь ли живёт этот тип со сплющенным ухом? — спросила Эллен.

— Да, здесь.

974

— Тогда, я думаю, Гомбер собирается встретиться с ним.

975

Нэнси напомнила подруге, что этот человек значится отсутствующим в городе предположительно потому, что его разыскивает полиция по обвинению в двух грабежах.

976

Хотя городок Хэнкок был маленький, на главной улице было весьма оживлённое движение. На перекрёстке в центре города стоял светофор. Гомбер успел проскочить на зелёный свет, но к тому моменту, когда до светофора добралась Нэнси, свет сменился на красный.

977

— Ах ты, батюшки! — так и кипела Нэнси. — Теперь я, вероятно, его потеряю!

978

Через несколько секунд вновь зажёгся зелёный свет, и Нэнси возобновила преследование. Однако она понимала, что теперь оно уже не имело смысла. Гомбер мог свернуть в любую из множества боковых улиц, если же он продолжал ехать прямо, то оторвался от неё настолько, что она вряд ли могла его догнать. Тем не менее Нэнси продолжала ехать ещё мили три. Потом, не видя больше своей добычи, она решила прекратить погоню.

979

— Думаю, что безнадёжно, Эллен, — сказала она. — Я вернусь в Хэнкок и сообщу обо всём тамошней полиции — Я попрошу их связаться с капитаном Росслэндом и капитаном Макгиннисом.

980

— Ах, я так надеюсь, что они поймают Гомбера! — воскликнула Эллен. — Это такой ужасный человек! Его следовало бы посадить в тюрьму хотя бы за одни его плохие манеры!

981

Улыбнувшись, Нэнси развернула машину и погнала назад в Хэнкок. Какая-то женщина указала ей, где находится полицейский участок, и спустя несколько минут Нэнси остановилась возле него. Девушки вошли в помещение. Нэнси сообщила дежурному офицеру, кто они такие, а потом подробно рассказала о недавней погоне.

982

Офицер внимательно выслушал и сказал:

— Я первым делом позвоню капитану в Ривер-Хайтс.

983

— И, пожалуйста, поставьте в известность ваших собственных сотрудников, а также полицию штата, — сказала Нэнси.

984

Он кивнул.

— Не беспокойтесь, мисс Дру. Я обо всём позабочусь. -

И он взялся за трубку телефона.

985

Эллен уговорила Нэнси немедленно отправиться домой.

— Пока ты тут разговаривала, я всё время думала о визите Гомбера в «Два вяза». Боюсь, что там могло что-нибудь произойти. Ты помнишь, какая самодовольная физиономия была у Гомбера, когда он отъезжал от нашего дома?

986

— Ты права, — согласилась Нэнси. — Нам, пожалуй, надо поскорее вернуться.

987

До «Двух вязов» расстояние было немалое, и чем ближе они были от дома, тем больше ими овладевало беспокойство.

— Мисс Флора и без того была уже больна, — нервно сказала Эллен, — и визит Гомбера мог ухудшить её состояние.

988

Когда они подъехали к дому, дверь им открыла тётя Розмари. Лицо у неё было бледное.

989

— Я так рада, что вы вернулись, — воскликнула она. — Маме стало намного хуже. Она перенесла тяжёлое потрясение. Я жду доктора Моррисона.

990

Голос миссис Хэйз дрожал, и ей явно было трудно продолжать. Нэнси сочувственно сказала:

— Мы знаем, что здесь побывал Натан Гомбер. Мы гнались за его машиной, но упустили её. Это он расстроил мисс Флору?

991

— Да. Я выходила из дома минут на двадцать поговорить с садовником и не заметила, как подъехал Гомбер. Его впустила уборщица, Лилли. Она, конечно, не знала, кто он такой, и приняла за порядочного человека. Когда она наконец решила выйти и сказать мне о посетителе, я была возле бесед-5й с глициниями, на дальнем конце территории. Между тем Гомбер поднялся наверх и завёл с мамой разговор о продаже дома. Когда она отказалась, он стал ей угрожать, говоря, что со мной и с вами обеими случится что-то ужасное. Бедная мама не выдержала. В этот момент Лилли, не сумевшая меня найти, вернулась в дом и поднялась наверх. Она засвидетельствовала подпись мамы на контракте о продаже дома и поставила свою подпись на этом документе. Таким образом Гомбер добился своего!

992

Тётя Розмари опустилась в кресло возле телефона и начала плакать. Нэнси и Эллен обняли её, но не успели они произнести ни одного словечка утешения, как услыхали шум подъехавшей к дому машины. Миссис Хэйз немедленно вытерла глаза, сказав:

— Это, наверное, доктор Моррисом.

993

Нэнси открыла врачу дверь. Все вместе они поднялись наверх, в комнату, где мисс Флора лежала, вперив глаза в потолок, похожая на человека, пребывающего в каком-то трансе. Она бормотала:

994

— Не надо мне было подписывать! Не надо мне было продавать «Два вяза»!

995

Доктор Моррисом посчитал больной пульс и послушал через стетоскоп её сердце. Спустя несколько минут он сказал:

— Миссис Тернбулл, пожалуйста, разрешите мне доставить вас в больницу.

996

— Нет, пока не надо, — упрямо заявила мисс Флора. Слабо улыбнувшись, она добавила: — Я знаю, что я больна. Но я не поправлюсь в больнице быстрее чем здесь. Мне и так предстоит достаточно скоро покинуть «Два вяза», и я хочу побыть здесь как можно дольше. Ах, зачем только я подписала эту бумагу!

997

Видя выражение отчаяния на лице врача, Нэнси подошла к постели больной.

— Мисс Флора, — сказала она ласково, — возможно, это сделка вообще не состоится. Во-первых, мы можем доказать, что вас принудили поставить свою подпись. Если это не поможет, вы знаете, сколько времени занимают поиски документа, удостоверяющего право собственности на то или иное имущество. К тому времени Гомбер может передумать.

998

— Ах, надеюсь, что ты права, — ответила старая женщина, с нежностью пожимая руку Нэнси.

999

Девушки вышли из комнаты, чтобы не мешать доктору Моррисону продолжить осмотр больной и прописать ей лекарства. Они решили ничего не рассказывать мисс Флоре о своём утреннем приключении, но тёте Розмари они во время ленча подробно все описали.

1000

— Я, пожалуй, даже рада, что вы не поймали Гомбера, — воскликнула миссис Хэйз. — Он мог причинить увечья вам обеим.

1001

Нэнси сказала, что полиция одного из городов, с которыми они связывались, в скором времени его поймает, и тогда, возможно, многое разъяснится.

— Во-первых, мы сможем узнать, зачем он включал и выключал фары. Интуиция мне подсказывает, что он подавал кому-то сигналы, и что тот человек, которому он сигнализировал прятался в доме «Речной пейзаж»,

1002

— Возможно, ты и права, — заметила тётя Розмари.

1003

Вдруг Эллен перегнулась через стол.

— Вы думаете, наш ворюга-призрак прячется там?

1004

— Я считаю это весьма вероятным, — заявила Нэнси. — мне бы хотелось осмотреть этот старый дом как следует.

1005

— Уже не собираешься ли ты вломиться туда без разрешения? — в ужасе спросила Эллен.

1006

Подруга её улыбнулась.

— Нет, Эллен, я не стану нарушать закон. Я обращусь к агенту по продаже недвижимости, который отвечает за этот дом, и попрошу его показать его мне. Хочешь пойти со мной?

1007

Эллен пробрала лёгкая дрожь, но всё-таки она согласилась.

— Давай сделаем это сегодня днём.

1008

— Ах, батюшки, — вздохнула тревожно тётя Розмари. — Прямо не знаю, пускать вас или не пускать. Мне это кажется очень опасным.

1009

— Если с нами будет агент, мы будем в безопасности, — сказала Эллен. В ответ на это тётка дала своё согласие и добавила, что контора агента по продаже недвижимости, мистера Додда, находится на Мэйн-стрит.

1010

Некоторое время все трое молчали, кончая ленч. Не успели они выйти из-за стола, как услышали громкий стук наверху.

1011

— О Боже! — вскрикнула тётя Розмари. — Надеюсь, мама не упала с постели!

1012

Все трое бросились вверх по лестнице. Мисс Флора находилась в постели, но она дрожала как осиновый листок. Тонкой белой рукой она указывала на потолок.

1013

— Это было на чердаке! Там кто-то есть!

1014

ЧЕРЕЗ ДВЕРЦУ ЛЮКА

1015

— Давайте выясним, кто там, на чердаке, — крикнула Нэнси, выбегая из комнаты. За ней по пятам следовала Эллен.

1016

— Мама, ничего с тобой не случится, если я оставлю тебя на несколько минут? — спросила тётя Розмари. — Мне хочется пойти с девушками.

1017

— Конечно. Беги!

1018

Нэнси и Эллен были уже на полпути к третьему этажу. Они не трудились шагать беззвучно, а мчались прямо по середине скрипучей лестницы. Добравшись до чердака, они зажгли две свечи и огляделись. Никого не увидев, они стали заглядывать за сундуки и различные предметы мебели, сваленные там. Никто за ними не прятался.

1019

Нет никаких признаков, что стук был вызван падением какого-нибудь ящика или коробки, — заметила Нэнси.

1020

— Ответ может быть только один, — сказала Эллен Призрак здесь был. Но каким образом он сюда проник?

1021

Не успела она закончить фразу, как все они услышали леденящий душу мужской смех. Он доносился явно не снизу

1022

— Он… он там, за стеной! — испуганно воскликнула Эллен. Нэнси с ней согласилась, но тётя Розмари заметила, что возможно, звуки идут с крыши.

1023

Эллен вопросительно посмотрела на тётку.

— Вы хотите сказать, что призрак забирается на крышу с дерева, а потом каким-то образом проникает сюда?

1024

— Я считаю это весьма вероятным, — отвечала та. Мой отец в своё время говорил маме, что где-то есть люк ведущий на крышу. Сама я никогда его не видела, и вот только сейчас впервые о нём вспомнила.

1025

Высоко подняв свечи, девушки внимательно осмотрели каждый дюйм островерхого, перекрытого балками потолка, Стропила располагались близко одно к другому, разделённые между собой деревянными панелями.

1026

— Я вижу что-то, похожее на люк! — крикнула вдруг Нэнси, находившаяся в дальнем конце чердака. Она показала остальным участок, где короткие панели образовывали почти правильный квадрат.

1027

— Но как он открывается? — спросила Эллен. — Ни ручки, ни крючка, — ничего, за что бы можно было ухватиться.

1028

— Ручку могли убрать или же она сама могла отвалиться, — заметила Нэнси.

1029

Она попросила Эллен помочь ей перетащить через чердак высокий деревянный ящик и, установив его прямо под подозрительным квадратом, взобралась на него. Осветив края панелей, она в конце концов обнаружила кусок металла, втиснутый между двумя планками.

1030

— Мне кажется, я знаю, как это можно открыть, — сказала Нэнси, — но мне нужны кое-какие инструменты.

1031

— Я принесу те, которыми мы пользовались в прошлый раз, — предложила Эллен. Торопливо спустившись вниз, она принесла отвёртки и молоток. Нэнси испробовала один инструмент за другим, но ни один не подходил — либо был слишком широк, чтобы уместиться в щели, либо не оказывал на кусок металла никакого действия — тот не двигался ни вверх, ни вниз.

1032

Нэнси взглянула сверху на тётю Розмари.

— Нет ли у вас случайно старинного крючка для пуговиц? Он как раз мог бы подойти здесь.

1033

— Конечно, есть. У мамы их несколько. Я сейчас принесу.

1034

Спустя несколько минут тётя Розмари вернулась и вручила Нэнси длинный крючок с серебряной ручкой, на которой были выгравированы инициалы миссис Тернбулл.

— Мама пользуется им, чтобы застёгивать высокие сапоги они у неё на пуговицах. У неё есть, кроме того, маленький крючок для застёгивания пуговиц на перчатках. В старину все дамские перчатки застёгивались на пуговицы. Нэнси вставила длинный крючок в щель, и почти сразу удалось ухватить рукой кусок металла и нажать его вниз. Она начала тянуть его вниз. Видя, что ничего не получается, Эллен взобралась на соседний ящик и стала помогать.

1035

Наконец раздался скрежещущий, скрипучий звук, и квадратный кусочек потолка начал опускаться вниз. Девушки продолжали дёргать металлический брус, и мало-помалу на свет начала появляться складная лестница, прикреплённая к деревянной доске.

1036

— Вот дверца люка! — радостно воскликнула Эллен, глядя на крышу. — Нэнси, тебе по праву принадлежит честь первой выглянуть наружу.

1037

Нэнси улыбнулась.

— Ты хочешь сказать: ли поймать призрака»?

1038

Однако когда лестницу, скрипевшую при каждом рывке, расправили и разложили так, чтобы можно было выбраться на крышу, Нэнси поняла, что призрак ею не пользовался. Больно уж много шума производила эта лестница. Она сомневалась также, что призрак находится на крыше, но посмотреть всё же стоило. Может, отыщется какой-то другой след, который поможет раскрыть тайну,

1039

— Ну что ж, я полезла! — крикнула Нэнси и начала взбираться по ступеням.

1040

Добравшись до верху, она открыла дверцу люка и подняла её вверх. Высунув голову наружу, она огляделась вокруг. На крыше никого не было видно, но в центре её помещался круглый деревянный наблюдательный пост. Нэнси пришло в голову, что призрак, быть может, прячется в нём.

1041

Она крикнула вниз тёте Розмари и Эллен, чтобы они посмотрели, нет ли в чердачном потолке отверстия, ведущего в башню. Через несколько секунд они вернулись и сообщили Нэнси, что никаких признаков какой-либо другой потайной Двери они не нашли.

1042

Тётя Розмари сказала:

— Вероятно, в старину такая дверь была, но потом её наглухо закрыли.

1043

Внезапно в голову юной сыщицы закралась дерзкая мысль:

Я подползу к той наблюдательной вышке и посмотрю, нет ли кого-нибудь внутри, — крикнула она вниз. Прежде чем кто-либо мог ей возразить, она начала ползти вдоль столба, лежавшего поверх покатой крыши. Эллен поспешно поднялась по лестнице и теперь со страхом следила за своей подругой.

1044

Нэнси! Будь осторожнее! — предупредила она.

1045

Но Нэнси и без того соблюдала крайнюю осторожность Ей необходимо было сохранять равновесие, ибо в противном случае ей грозили падение и верная смерть. На полпути к башне смелой девушке пришло в голову, что она действует безрассудно, однако она твёрдо решила добраться до цели «Осталось всего пять футов», — сказала себе Нэнси. Со вздохом облегчения она добралась до башни и, подтянувшись, встала на ноги. Башня была круглой и на обеих её сторонах имелись отверстия. Она заглянула внутрь. Никакого «призрака» там не было!

1046

Нэнси решила войти внутрь и осмотреть пол. Она поставила на доски одну ногу, но прогнивший от дождей и ветра настил подался вниз под её тяжестью.

1047

«Хорошо, что я не ступила обеими ногами!» — радостно подумала она.

1048

— Ну, видишь что-нибудь? — крикнула Эллен.

1049

— Решительно ничего. По этому полу очень давно никто не ходил.

1050

— Значит, призрак проник в дом не через крышу, — констатировала Эллен.

1051

Нэнси кивнула в знак согласия.

— Единственные места, куда осталось ещё заглянуть, — это трубы, — сказала она. — Я их проверю.

1052

Труб было целых четыре, и Нэнси подползла к каждой из них по очереди. Она заглянула в каждую, но не обнаружила никаких признаков того, что призрак использовал какую-либо из них для проникновения в дом.

1053

Держась одной рукой за последнюю трубу, Нэнси оглядела окружающую местность. «Какой красивый и живописный пейзаж!» — подумала она. Поблизости протекала маленькая ленивая речка, поблёскивавшая на солнце. Окружающие поля были зелёные, испещрённые белыми ромашками. Нэнси поглядела на территорию, окружавшую «Два вяза», и попыталась мысленно представить себе первоначальный пейзаж поместья.

1054

«Вон та выложенная кирпичом дорожка, ведущая к соседнему дому, наверное, когда-то была окаймлена красивой самшитовой изгородью», — подумала Нэнси.

1055

Теперь она перевела взор на дом «Речной пейзаж». Территория вокруг дома заросла сорняками, на некоторых окнах не хватало ставней. Внезапно её внимание привлекло одно из незавешенных окон. Действительно ли она видела движущийся внутри свет, или ей показалось?

1056

Спустя мгновение свет исчез, так что уверенности у неё не было. Может, это луч солнца, ударивший в стекло, создал оптическую иллюзию?

1057

«И всё-таки, — думала девушка, — кто-то, возможно, находится в доме. Чем скорее я туда попаду и погляжу, что там и как, тем лучше! Если призрак прячется там, он, может быть пользуется каким-нибудь тайным переходом, берущим начало в одной из надворных построек поместья».

1058

Нэнси осторожно добралась ползком обратно до дверцы люка и девушки вдвоём её закрыли. Тётя Розмари уже спустилась вниз, к матери.

1059

Нэнси рассказала Эллен, что она, как ей показалось, видела в соседнем доме.

— Я сейчас же переоденусь, и давай отправимся к мистеру Додду которому поручена продажа дома «Речной пейзаж».

1060

Спустя полчаса девушки уже входили в контору агента. Сам мистер Додд оказался на месте, и Нэнси спросила его, нельзя ли осмотреть дом «Речной пейзаж».

1061

— Сожалею, мисс, — ответил он, — но дом только что продан.

1062

Нэнси была ошеломлена. Все её планы, казалось, рушились. Но тут ей пришла в голову одна мысль. Возможно, новый владелец ничего не будет иметь против того, чтобы она просто осмотрела дом.

1063

— Не можете ли вы мне сказать, мистер Додд, кто купил дом?

1064

— Пожалуйста! Некий господин по имени Натан Гомбер.

1065

ИСПОВЕДЬ

1066

На лице Нэнси Дру выразилось такое разочарование, что мистер Додд, агент по продаже недвижимости, сочувственно сказал:

— Не огорчайтесь, мисс. Я не думаю, чтобы этот дом мог вас заинтересовать. Он находится в довольно скверном состоянии. И, кроме того, вам понадобится куча денег, чтобы привести его в порядок.

1067

Обойдя это замечание стороной, Нэнси спросила:

— А вы не могли бы позволить мне посмотреть дом изнутри?

1068

Мистер Додд покачал головой.

— Боюсь, мистеру Гомберу это может не понравиться.

1069

Нэнси не хотела сдаваться. Ведь в этом самом доме, быть может, держат в плену её отца! «Конечно, — думала она, — я могу сообщить о своих подозрениях полиции».

1070

Она решила подождать до утра, а тогда, если по-прежнему не будет никаких вестей о мистере Дру, она свяжется с капитаном Росслэндом.

1071

У мистера Додда зазвонил на столе телефон. Он начал с ем-то говорить, а Нэнси и Эллен направились к выходу. Мистер Додд жестом позвал их назад.

1072

— Звонит капитан Росслэнд, мисс Дру, — сказал он. -

Он звонил в «Два вяза» и узнал, что вы здесь. Он хочет немедленно вас видеть.

1073

Нэнси поблагодарила, и девушки вышли. Они поспешили в полицейский участок, недоумевая, зачем бы капитану по надобилась Нэнси,

1074

— Ах, если бы это были какие-нибудь новости о папе, — горячо воскликнула она. — Но почему он сам со мной не связался?

1075

— Я не хочу выливать на тебя ушат холодной воды, — сказала Эллен. — Но может быть, речь идёт вовсе не о твоём отце. Может, они поймали Натана Гомбера.

1076

Перед зданием участка Нэнси немного взбодрилась, и две девушки торопливо вошли в помещение. Капитан Росс-Лэнд их ждал, и их немедленно провели к нему в кабинет. Нэнси представила Эллен Корнинг.

1077

— Не буду испытывать ваше терпение, — сказал капитан, глядя на взволнованное лицо Нэнси. — Мы арестовали Сэмюэла Гринмэна.

1078

— Человека с расплющенным ухом? — спросила Эллен,

1079

— Совершенно верно, — ответил капитан. — Благодаря вашей информации относительно подержанной машины, мисс Дру, наши люди отыскали его без всякого труда.

1080

Капитан далее сказал, что арестованный отказался признаться в том, что имел какое-либо касательство к исчезновению мистера Дру.

1081

— Более того, таксист Гарри — он сейчас здесь, у нас, — утверждает, что не может с уверенностью опознать в Гринмэне одного из пассажиров своей машины. Мы полагаем, что Гарри боится, как бы дружки Гринмэна не избили его или не напали бы на кого-либо из членов его семьи.

1082

— Гарри действительно говорил мне, — вставила Нэнси, — что его пассажир пригрозил ему: если он не забудет все, свидетелем чего оказался, с его семьёй что-нибудь сделают.

1083

— Это подтверждает нашу теорию, — сказал капитан Росслэнд. — Мисс Дру, мы думаем, что вы можете помочь полиции.

1084

— С радостью! Каким образом? Капитан Росслэнд улыбнулся,

— Вы, может быть, этого не знаете, но вы обладаете большим даром убеждать людей. Я думаю, что вам, быть может, удастся получить как от Гарри, так и от Гринмэна информацию, которой мы не смогли от них добиться.

1085

После короткого размышления Нэнси скромно ответила.

— Я с радостью попытаюсь, но только при одном условии. — Она улыбнулась капитану, — Я должна говорить с этими людьми наедине.

1086

— Ваше условие принято, — с улыбкой сказал капитан Росслэнд. Он добавил, что они с Эллен подождут в другом месте а пока он распорядится, чтобы привели Гарри.

1087

— Желаю удачи, — сказала Эллен, покидая вместе с капитаном комнату.

1088

Несколько мгновении спустя вошёл Гарри. Один. — О! Здравствуйте, мисс, — приветствовал он Нэнси, оторвав на секунду глаза от пола.

1089

— Садитесь, пожалуйста, Гарри, — предложила Нэнси, показывая на стул рядом со своим. — Со стороны капитана было очень любезно позволить мне поговорить с вами.

1090

Гарри сел, но не произнёс ни слова. Он нервно теребил в руках свою шофёрскую фуражку и упорно продолжал смотреть себе под ноги.

1091

— Гарри, — начала Нэнси, — я думаю, ваши дети страшно переживали бы, если бы вас похитили.

1092

— Они просто не выдержали бы этого, — с жаром воскликнул таксист.

1093

— Тогда, значит, вы представляете, что я испытываю, — продолжала Нэнси. — Целых два дня от отца ни словечка. Если бы ваши дети знали кого-то, кто видел человека, похитившего вас, легко бы им было, если бы этот человек отказался рассказать, что он знает?

1094

На этот раз Гарри поднял глаза и посмотрел Нэнси прямо в лицо.

— Я вас понял, мисс. Когда что-то доходит до тебя по-настоящему, все предстаёт в ином свете. Ваша взяла! Я могу опознать этого негодяя Гринмэна, и я это сделаю. Зовите сюда капитана.

1095

Нэнси не стала терять время. Открыв дверь, она позвала капитана.

1096

— Гарри хочет вам что-то сказать, — сообщила Нэнси капитану Росслэнду.

1097

— Ага, — подтвердил Гарри. — Больше не стану запираться. Я признаю, что Гринмэн меня запугал, но он — тот самый пассажир, который ехал в моей машине, а потом, когда другой пассажир потерял сознание, велел мне помалкивать,

1098

Капитан Росслэнд был поражён. Было совершенно очевидно, что ему просто не верилось, что за какие-нибудь несколько минут Нэнси удалось убедить этого человека заговорить.

1099

— А теперь, — спросила Нэнси, — могу я побеседовать с арестованным?

1100

Я попрошу отвести вас в его камеру, — ответил капитан и вызвал полицейского.

1101

Нэнси провели по коридору мимо ряда камер к той, где сидел на койке человек с расплющенным ухом,

1102

— Гринмэн, подите сюда! — сказал полицейский, — то — мисс Нэнси Дру, дочь похищенного. Она хочет с вами поговорить.

1103

Узник подошёл, шаркая ногами, но пробормотал:

— Ни на какие вопросы отвечать не стану. Нэнси подождала, пока полицейский удалился, и улыбнулась узнику.

— Мы все иной раз совершаем ошибки, — сказала она — Нас часто сбивают с пути люди, заставляющие нас делать то что делать не следует. Вы, возможно, боитесь, что вас приговорят к смертной казни за участие в похищении моего отца. Н если вы не сознавали серьёзность всей затеи, вам могут предъявить обвинение всего лишь в участии в заговоре.

1104

К удивлению Нэнси, Гринмэн неожиданно выпалил: — Вы попали в самую точку, мисс. Я не имел почти никакого отношения к похищению вашего отца. Тот малый, который был со мной вместе, — вот кто в этом деле собаку съел. У него длиннейший стаж тюремных отсидок. Я не сидел. Честно вам говорю, барышня, с моей стороны — это первое нарушение закона. Я вам все расскажу. Этого парня я встретил впервые вечером в понедельник. Он, конечно, много чего мне наплёл. Но всё, что от меня требовалось, — это следить, чтобы ваш папаша не сбежал. Тот, второй участник дела, усыпил вашего отца наркотиком.

1105

— А где мой отец сейчас? — прервала его Нэнси.

1106

— Не знаю. Честное слово, не знаю, — твердил Гринмэн. — Часть плана состояла в том, что кто-то должен будет поехать следом за такси. Спустя некоторое время мистеру Дру надо было дать что-то понюхать. Штука эта ничем не пахла. Вот почему наш таксист ничего не заметил. И на остальных не подействовало: чтобы наркотик оказал действие, его надо сунуть человеку прямо под нос.

1107

— А человек, который следовал за вами в машине и увёз моего отца, — кто он?

1108

— Не знаю, — ответил арестованный, и Нэнси почувствовала, что он говорит правду.

1109

— Вам заплатили за то, что вы сделали? — спросила Нэнси.

1110

— Самую малость. Далеко не такую сумму, какую следовало бы, особенно, если мне грозит тюрьма. Тип, который заплатил нам за нашу работу, был тот самый, что ехал в машине за нами и увёз вашего отца.

1111

— Вы можете его описать? — спросила Нэнси.

1112

— Конечно. Надеюсь, полиция скоро его поймает. Ему лет пятьдесят с небольшим, низкорослый и коренастый, бледный, а глаза какие-то водянисто-голубые.

1113

Нэнси спросила арестованного, согласится ли он продиктовать своё признание сотруднику полиции, и тот кивнул.

— И вот что, мисс: мне ужас как неприятно, что я причинил столько беспокойства, Надеюсь, вы скоро найдёте своего отца, и жалею, что мало чем смог вам помочь. Выходит, я — не иначе как трус. Боюсь назвать имя человека, уговорившего меня ввязаться во всё это дело. Вот уж кто поистине скверный человечишка — даже представить себе трудно, что могло бы со мной случиться, назови я его имя.

1114

Юная сыщица решила, что получила от этого человека информацию, на которую могла рассчитывать. Она отправилась к капитану Росслэнду, который вновь удивился её успеху. он вызвал стенографистку и, попрощавшись с Нэнси и Эллен, пошёл в камеру Гринмэна.

1115

На обратном пути Эллен поздравила подругу.

— Я уверена, что теперь, когда один из похитителей пойман, твоего отца скоро найдут. Кто, по-твоему, был тот человек, который забрал мистера Дру у Гринмэна и его дружка?

1116

У Нэнси был озадаченный вид, Подумав, она сказала:

— Из его описания мы знаем, что это не был Гомбер. Но, Эллен, я нутром все больше чувствую, что за всем этим стоит именно он. Если сложить два и два, получится, что за рулём той, второй, машины был Вилли Уортон. Я также думаю, что Уортон разыгрывал роль призрака, пользуясь иногда масками и появляясь то в образе гориллы, то в образе небритого мужчины с длинными волосами. Каким-то образом он пробирается в дом и подслушивает наши разговоры. Он услыхал, что вы собираетесь попросить меня разгадать тайну «Двух вязов», и сообщил об этом Гомберу. Вот почему Гомбер явился к нам в дом и попытался воспрепятствовать моей поездке сюда, заявляя, что мне, мол, надо держаться поближе к папе.

1117

— Правильно, — согласилась Эллен. — А когда он выяснил, что его предупреждение не подействовало, он заставил Вилли, Гринмэна и того, третьего человека похитить твоего отца. Он решил, что это, наверняка, заставит тебя покинуть «Два вяза». Он хотел запугать мисс Флору и таким образом заставить её продать поместье, и он думал, что, если в это время ты будешь поблизости, ты её отговоришь.

1118

— Однако тут я потерпела неудачу, — грустно заметила Нэнси. — Кроме того, они знали, что папа может помешать этим алчным земельным собственникам выкачать из железной Дороги больше денег за свои участки. Вот почему я уверена, что Гомбер и Уортон не выпустят его до тех пор, пока не добьются чего хотят.

1119

Эллен положила руку на плечо Нэнси.

Как я сожалею обо всём этом! Что мы можем теперь предпринять?

1120

— Я почему-то предчувствую, Эллен, — отозвалась Нэнси, — что мы с тобой в скором времени найдём Вилли Уортона. И если это случится и я выясню, что он действительно подписал контракт о продаже участка, я хочу, чтобы здесь поблизости находились кое-какие лица.

1121

— Кто именно? — спросила Эллен.

1122

— Мистер Баррадэйл, юрист, и мистер Уотсон, общественный нотариус.

1123

Юная сыщица привела свой замысел в исполнение, Зная что понедельник — последний срок, установленный железной дорогой, она решила сделать всё, что в её силах, чтобы к этом!! сроку разгадать сложную тайну. Когда они вернулись в «Два вяза», Нэнси позвонила мистеру Баррадэйлу. Она не решалась произнести вслух имена Гомбера или Вилли Уортона, опасаясь что кто-нибудь из них, возможно, подслушивает. Поэтому она просто спросила молодого юриста, может ли он приехать в Клифвуд и захватить с собой всё то, что, по его мнению, может понадобиться, чтобы выиграть дело.

1124

— Мне кажется, я догадываюсь, что вы на самом деле имеете в виду, — ответил тот, — Насколько я понимаю, вы не можете свободно говорить. Так?

— Да.

1125

— В таком случае я буду задавать вопросы. Вы хотите, чтобы я прибыл по тому адресу, который вы оставили нам в прошлый раз?

— Да. Около полудня.

1126

— И вы хотели бы, чтобы я привёз с собой контракт о продаже земли с подписью Вилли Уортона?

1127

— Да. Это было бы замечательно. — Нэнси поблагодарила его и повесила трубку.

1128

После этого она отправилась на поиски своей подруги. Найдя Эллен, она сказала;

— Сейчас ещё очень светло. Хотя мы и не можем попасть внутрь дома «Речной пейзаж», мы можем обследовать тамошние надворные постройки и поискать, не найдём ли вход в подземный переход, ведущий к нашему дому.

1129

— Идёт, — согласилась Эллен. — Только на этот раз искать будешь ты. А я буду караулить.

1130

Нэнси решила начать с коптильни, так как это помещение было расположено ближе всех к поместью «Два вяза». Там никаких следов не нашлось, и она перешла в каретный сарай. Но ни здесь, ни в каком-либо другом строении девушка не нашла никаких признаков входа в подземный переход. Наконец она сдалась и присоединилась к Эллен.

1131

— Если отверстие имеется, оно должно находиться внутри дома, — заявила Нэнси, — Ах, Эллен, я просто из себя выхожу оттого, что нельзя попасть туда!

1132

— Сейчас я туда вообще бы ни в коем случае не пошла, — заметила Эллен. — Мы давно уже пропустили время ужина, и я страшно голодна. Кроме того, довольно скоро станет совсем темно.

1133

Девушки вернулись домой и поужинали. Вскоре после этого кто-то начал стучать молоточком в парадную дверь. Вдвоём они пошли открывать и сильно удивились, увидев на пороге агента по продаже недвижимости, мистера Додда. Он протянул Нэнси большой медный ключ.

1134

— Это ещё зачем? — спросила заинтригованная Нэнси.

Мистер Додд улыбнулся.

1135

— Это — ключ от парадной двери дома «Речной пейзаж». Я решил, что вы можете осматривать дом завтра утром сколько пожелаете.

1136

СКРЫТАЯ ЛЕСТНИЦА

1137

Увидев выражение восторга на лице Нэнси, мистер Додд рассмеялся,

— Вы думаете, тот дом тоже посещают призраки, так же, как и этот? — спросил он. — Я слыхал, вы любите разгадывать тайны.

1138

— Люблю! — Не желая посвящать агента в свои истинные планы, Нэнси тоже засмеялась. — А вы считаете, я могу найти там призрак? — спросила она.

1139

— Ну, сам я никогда их не видел, но как знать, — ответил с усмешкой мистер Додд. Он сказал, что оставляет Нэнси ключ до субботнего вечера, а потом заберёт его. — Если мистер Гомбер появится до этого, у меня есть ключ к двери чёрного хода, которым он может воспользоваться.

1140

Нэнси поблагодарила мистера Додда и сказала с улыбкой, что обязательно даст ему знать, если обнаружит в том доме призрак.

1141

Она еле дождалась наступления утра. Мисс Флоре ничего не сказали о плане девушек посетить соседний дом.

1142

Сразу же после завтрака они отправились в дом «Речной пейзаж». Тётя Розмари дошла с ними до задней двери и пожелала им удачи.

— Обещайте мне, что вы не станете рисковать, — умоляющим голосом попросила она их,

1143

— Обещаем, — в один голос ответили девушки.

1144

Сунув в карманы юбок электрические фонарики, Нэнси и Эллен торопливо прошли через сад на территорию соседнего поместья.

1145

Когда они подходили к парадному крыльцу, Эллен начала проявлять признаки нервозности.

— Нэнси, а что мы будем делать, если действительно встретим призрака? — спросила она.

1146

— Просто скажем, что мы его накрыли, — решительно ответила её подруга.

1147

Эллен больше не сказала ни слова, наблюдая за тем, как Нэнси вставляет огромный медный ключ в замок. Он повернулся легко, и девушки вошли в холл. Архитектурно это была копия «Двух вязов», но как по-иному выглядел этот дом?

Занавеси были спущены, что придавало тёмным комнатам атмосферу таинственности. Всюду лежала пыль, с потолка лестничных перекладин фестонами свисала паутина.

1148

— Явно не похоже на то, что тут кто-то живёт, заметила Эллен. — Где мы начнём наши поиски?

1149

— Я хочу заглянуть в кухню, — сказала Нэнси. Когда они вошли туда, Эллен так и ахнула.

1150

— Думаю, я ошиблась. Кто-то здесь ест. — Кухонная раковина была забита яичной скорлупой, несколькими пустыми бутылками из-под молока, куриными костями и обрывка ми пергаментной бумаги.

1151

Почувствовав, что Эллен не по себе, Нэнси хихикнула и шепнула ей в ухо:

— Если здесь живёт призрак, то аппетит у него явно неплохой!

1152

Девушка вытащила свой фонарик и осветила им пол и стены кухни. Никаких признаков тайного отверстия нигде не было. Она стала переходить из комнаты в комнату первого этажа; Эллен шла следом и сообща они самым тщательным образом осмотрели все в поисках спрятанной двери. Наконец они пришли к заключению, что такой двери здесь нет.

1153

— А знаешь, она может находиться в погребе, — сказала Нэнси.

1154

— Ну уж нет, туда ты не пойдёшь, — твёрдо заявила Эллен. — Во всяком случае, без сопровождения полицейского. Это слишком опасно. Что касается меня, я хочу жить, хочу выйти замуж и вовсе не желаю, чтобы призрак стукнул меня в темноте по голове, так что Джим останется без невесты.

1155

Нэнси засмеялась.

— Твоя взяла! Но я объясню, почему. В данный момент я более заинтересована в том, чтобы найти моего отца, чем в поисках тайного перехода. Папу, возможно, держат пленником в одной из комнат наверху, Я собираюсь проверить, так ли это.

1156

Дверь на чёрную лестницу была не заперта, а дверь наверху этой лестницы распахнута настежь. Нэнси попросила Эллен постоять у подножья парадной лестницы, пока сама она поднимется наверх по чёрной.

— Если этот самый призрак находится там и попробует сбежать, ускользнуть ему не удастся, — объяснила она.

1157

Эллен заняла свой пост в парадном холле, а Нэнси начала, крадучись, подниматься по ступенькам чёрной лестницы. Ни по той, ни по другой лестнице никто спуститься не собирался. Теперь Эллен перешла на второй этаж, и они начали вместе с Нэнси обыскивать комнаты. Ничего подозрительного они не обнаружили. Мистера Дру там не было, и никаких признаков пребывания призрака также. Ни в одной из стен не было ничего, похожего на скрытое отверстие. Но в спальне, соответствующей спальне мисс Флоры, имелся стенной шкаф для одежды, встроенный в стену в дальнем конце комнаты, рядом с камином.

1158

— В колониальные времена стенные шкафы были редкостью — заметила Нэнси. — Интересно, был ли этот шкаф устроен в то время и отвечает ли он какому-нибудь особому назначению?

1159

Она быстро открыла одну из больших дверей и заглянула внутрь, задняя стенка состояла из двух очень широких деревянных планок. В центре находилась круглая ручка, как бы утопленная в окружающей древесине.

1160

— Это странно, — возбуждённо заметила Нэнси,

1161

Она потянула ручку, но стена не двинулась. Тогда она с силой надавила ручку книзу, всей тяжестью тела налегая на панель.

1162

Внезапно стена подалась внутрь. Нэнси потеряла равновесие и исчезла в зияющей дыре внизу.

1163

Эллен громко закричала:

— Нэнси!

1164

Дрожа от страха, она вошла в стенной шкаф и направила луч своего фонарика вниз. Она увидела длинный марш каменных ступеней.

1165

— Нэнси! Нэнси! — окликала подругу Эллен.

1166

Наконец снизу донёсся приглушённый ответ. Эллен почувствовала, как от облегчения у неё радостно забилось сердце. «Нэнси жива!» — сказала она себе, после чего крикнула:

— Где ты?

1167

— Я нашла тайный переход, — донёсся до Эллен слабый голос. — Спускайся вниз.

1168

Эллен более не колебалась. Она хотела удостовериться в том, что с Нэнси всё в порядке. В тот самый момент, когда она стала спускаться вниз, дверь начала закрываться. В панике, что они могут попасться в ловушку в каком-нибудь подземном тоннеле, Эллен отчаянно ухватилась рукой за дверь. Держа её приоткрытой, она стянула с себя свитер и вставила его в виде клина в отверстие.

1169

Найдя где-то на ступенях железный прут, Эллен схватила его и поспешила вниз. Навстречу ей с вонючего земляного пола поднялась Нэнси.

1170

— Ты уверена, что с тобой всё в порядке? — заботливо спросила Эллен.

1171

— Должна признаться, что я здорово грохнулась, — ответила Нэнси, — Но теперь я чувствую себя хорошо. Давай Посмотрим, куда ведёт этот коридор.

1172

Фонарик при падении выскочил у неё из руки, но с помощью фонарика Эллен она его быстро нашла. К счастью, он Не был повреждён, и она тут же его включила.

1173

Коридор был очень узким, а потолок его был так низок, что девушки едва могли идти, не сгибаясь в три погибели Стены были сложены из крошащегося кирпича и камня.

1174

— Всё это может в любую минуту на нас обрушиться — встревожено сказала Эллен.

1175

— Ну, я не думаю, — отозвалась Нэнси. — Ведь это наверняка существует с очень давних пор.

1176

Подземный коридор был неприятно сырым, и воздух в нём был затхлым. Стены были покрыты влагой. Они были какие-то липкие и отвратительные на ощупь.

1177

В какой-то точке тоннель начал извиваться и петлять, как если бы строители натолкнулись на преграду, которую им трудно было преодолеть.

1178

— Куда, по-твоему, он ведёт? — прошептала Эллен.

1179

— Не знаю. Надеюсь только, что мы не ходим по кругу, возвращаясь на одно и то же место.

1180

Тут девушки подошли к новому маршу каменных ступеней, весьма похожих на те, с которых свалилась Нэнси, Однако у этой лестницы были прочные каменные стенки. При свете своих фонариков девушки разглядели наверху дверь, перекрытую тяжёлым деревянным брусом,

1181

— Пойдём наверх? — спросила Эллен.

1182

Нэнси не знала, как поступить. Тоннель здесь не кончался, а уходил куда-то дальше, в темноту. Стоит ли им пройти по нему, а уж потом выяснить, что находится на верху лестницы?

1183

Она высказала свои сомнения вслух, но Эллен стала настаивать, чтобы они поднялись наверх.

— Я буду с тобой откровенна. Мне бы хотелось уйти отсюда.

1184

Нэнси согласилась с подругой и пошла впереди вверх по лестнице.

1185

Вдруг обе девушки замерли на месте.

1186

Мужской голос, донёсшийся из дальнего конца тоннеля, скомандовал:

— Стоп! Туда нельзя!

1187

ПОБЕДА НЭНСИ

1188

Справившись с первоначальным испугом, обе девушки повернулись и направили свои фонарики на каменную лестницу. Внизу стоял низкорослый небритый толстоватый человечек с белесыми глазами.

1189

— Вы и есть призрак! — заикаясь проговорила Эллен.

1190

— И зовут вас Вилли Уортон, — добавила Нэнси. Поражённый мужчина заморгал глазами под яркими лучами света и сказал:

— Да, это я. Но как вы узнали?

1191

— Вы живёте в доме «Речной пейзаж», — продолжала Эллен и занимаетесь тем, что крадёте в «Двух вязах» серебро и драгоценности.

1192

Нет! Нет! Я не вор! — вскричал Вилли Уортон. — Я действительно забрал кое-какие продукты и я пытался напугать старых дам, чтобы они согласились продать своё поместье Иногда я надевал маску, но я никогда не брал никаких драгоценностей или серебро. Честное слово, не брал. Вероятно, это — дело рук мистера Гомбера!

1193

Нэнси и Эллен были удивлены — Вилли Уортон, без всяких понуканий с их стороны, признавался в том, чего они и не ожидали от него услышать.

1194

— А вы знали, что Натан Гомбер — вор? — спросила Нэнси.

1195

Уортон покачал головой.

— Я знаю, что он очень ловок — именно поэтому он добьётся, чтобы железная дорога заплатила мне большую сумму за мою собственность.

1196

— Мистер Уортон, а вы подписали первоначальный контракт о продаже участка? — спросила Нэнси.

1197

— Да, подписал, но мистер Гомбер сказал, что, если я на какое-то время скроюсь, он устроит все так, что мне заплатят больше. Он сказал, что я могу помочь ему и ещё в некоторых делах, которые он затеял. Одно из этих дел — сыграть роль призрака здесь, — к тому же, это прекрасное место, где можно скрыться. Но я был бы рад никогда в жизни не видеть ни Натана Гомбера, ни усадьбы «Речной пейзаж» и «Два вяза» и не разыгрывать из себя призрака.

1198

— Я рада это слышать, — сказала Нэнси, а потом вдруг спросила: — Где мой отец?

1199

Вилли Уортон начал переминаться с ноги на ногу и дико озираться вокруг.

— Я не знаю, право же, не знаю.

1200

— Но ведь вы похитили и увезли его на своей машине, — подсказала ему девушка. — Мы получили от таксиста описание вашей внешности.

1201

Прошло несколько секунд, прежде чем Вилли Уортон ответил.

— Я не знал тогда, что происходит похищение. Мистер Гомбер сказал, что ваш отец заболел и что он отвезёт его к какому-то специалисту. Он заявил, что мистер Дру ехал поездом из Чикаго и должен был встретиться с мистером Гомбером на полпути между тем местом, где мы сейчас находимся, и вокзалом. Но, по словам Гомбера, он не смог его встретить, так как был занят другими делами. Поэтому он предложил мне последовать за такси, в котором находился ваш отец, и привезти его сюда, в дом «Речной пейзаж».

1202

— Ну, ну, продолжайте, — сказала Нэнси, когда Вилли Уортон замолк, закрыв лицо руками.

1203

— Когда я забрал вашего отца, я не знал, что он без сознания, — продолжал Уортон. — Те мужчины, что находились в такси, перенесли мистера Дру в мою машину, и я привёз его сюда. Тут подъехал мистер Гомбер и заявил, что о дальнейшем позаботится он сам. Он велел мне перейти на территорию «Двух вязов» и разыгрывать там роль призрака.

1204

— И вы не имеете ни малейшего представления, куда мистер Гомбер дел моего отца? — с упавшим сердцем спросила Нэнси.

1205

— Ни малейшего.

1206

Нэнси в нескольких словах рассказала Уортону, что представляет из себя Натан Гомбер, надеясь, что, если этот человек всё же знает что-то о местонахождении её отца, он скорее признается в этом. Но, слушая решительные ответы Уортона и его искренние предложения всячески помочь в поисках пропавшего юриста, Нэнси пришла к выводу, что Уортон ничего не утаивает.

1207

— Как вы узнали об этом тоннеле и потайных лестницах? — спросила его Нэнси.

1208

— Гомбер нашёл в куче всяческого хлама на чердаке дома «Речной пейзаж» старинную тетрадь, — ответил Уортон. — Он сказал, что в ней содержатся все необходимые сведения о секретных входах в оба дома. Тоннели, имеющие выходы на каждом этаже, были построены тогда же, когда строились сами дома. Прежние поколения Тернбуллов использовали их в плохую погоду, чтобы переходить из одного здания в другое! Эта лестница предназначалась для слуг, а две другие — для членов семьи. Одна из лестниц вела в спальню мистера Тёрн-булла в этом доме. В тетради также говорилось, что он часто втайне принимал у себя агентов правительства, и иногда, когда являлись посетители, ему приходилось срочно выпроваживать их из гостиной и прятать в тоннеле.

1209

— А куда ведёт эта лестница? — спросила Эллен.

1210

— На чердак в «Двух вязах». — Вилли Уортон тихонько хихикнул. — Я знаю, мисс Дру, что вы почти что нашли вход. Но те, кто строил эти дома, были ребята ловкие. Каждое отверстие имеет тяжёлые двойные двери. Когда вы вставили отвёртку в щель, вы решили, что она упёрлась в стену, на самом же деле это была вторая дверь.

1211

— Это вы играли на скрипке, включали радио и шумели на чердаке? И это вы смеялись, когда мы там были?

1212

— Да, я передвинул диван, чтобы напугать вас, и я знал даже про пункт подслушивания. Именно благодаря этому пункту я узнавал обо всех ваших планах и мог докладывать о них мистеру Гомберу.

1213

Внезапно Нэнси пришло в голову, что Натан Гомбер мог появиться на месте действия в любой момент. Ей необходимо увести отсюда Вилли Уортона и заставить его клятвенно Утвердить свою подпись, пока он не передумал!

1214

— Мистер Уортон, пожалуйста, пойдите по этой лестнице впереди нас и откройте нам двери, — попросила она. — Опрошу вас пойти вместе с нами в «Два вяза» и поговорить миссис Тернбулл и миссис Хэйз. Я хочу, чтобы вы им сказали что это вы разыгрывали роль призрака, но больше не станете этого делать. Мисс Флора до того напугана, что заболела и слегла.

1215

— Я очень сожалею об этом, — отозвался Вилли Уортон — Конечно, я пойду с вами. Я не желаю никогда больше видеть Натана Гомбера!

1216

Он пошёл впереди девушек и снял тяжёлый деревянный брус, перекрывавший дверь. Широко распахнув её, он потянул за металлическое кольцо на другой стороне соседней двери и быстро отступил. Узкое отверстие, прикрытое панелью, которое, как и подозревала Нэнси, вело к потайной лестнице, открылось. Проход, позволявший подняться на верхние ступени и оттуда пройти на чердак, был очень узок, Чтобы Гомбер не заподозрил чего-либо в случае своего прихода, Нэнси попросила Вилли Уортона снова закрыть потайную дверь.

1217

— Эллен, — сказала Нэнси, — пожалуйста, спустись поскорее вниз и сообщи мисс Флоре и тёте Розмари о наших добрых новостях.

1218

Она дала Эллен три минуты на то, чтобы сойти вниз, после чего спустились по лестнице они с Уортоном. Поражённые женщины пришли в восторг от того, что тайна разгадана. Но времени торжествовать победу не было.

1219

— Тебя поджидает внизу мистер Баррадэйл, Нэнси, — сообщила тётя Розмари.

1220

Нэнси повернулась к Вилли Уортону.

— Пожалуйста, пойдёмте со мной.

1221

Она представилась мистеру Баррадэйлу, а затем представила ему так долго отсутствовавшего собственника земельного участка.

— Мистер Уортон говорит, что подпись на контракте о продаже земли — его, — сообщила она.

1222

— И вы готовы присягнуть в этом? — спросил юрист, обращаясь к Уортону.

1223

— Разумеется. Я не желаю больше иметь никакого касательства к этим махинациям, — заявил Вилли Уортон.

1224

— Я знаю, где можно сразу же найти нотариуса, — сообщила Нэнси. — Мистер Баррадэйл, вы хотите, чтобы я ему позвонила?

1225

— Пожалуйста. Сделайте это, не откладывая.

1226

Нэнси бросилась к телефону и набрала номер Альберта Уотсона, проживающего на Тертл-роуд. Когда он подошёл к телефону, она описала ему срочность дела, и он пообещал немедленно явиться. Через пять минут мистер Уотсон действительно пришёл, все необходимые для исполнения его функций документы и печати были при нём. Мистер Баррадэйд показал ему контракт о продаже, на котором значились имя Вилли Уортона и его подпись. К нему была приложена справка, удостоверяющая подпись.

1227

Мистер Уотсон предложил Вилли Уортону поднять правую руку и поклясться в том, что он действительно то самое лицо, которое упоминается в контракте о продаже. После того как это было сделано, нотариус заполнил нужные графы в справке, подписал её, поставил на документе штамп, а затем скрепил его собственной печатью.

1228

— Ну что ж, это просто великолепная работа, мисс Дру, — похвалил девушку юрист.

1229

Нэнси улыбнулась, но её радость по поводу того, что ей удалось кое-что сделать для отца, омрачалась тем, что ей все ещё не было известно, где он находится. Мистер Баррадэйл и Вилли Уортон также были этим крайне встревожены.

1230

— Я пойду звонить капитану Росслэнду и попрошу его немедленно прислать сюда нескольких полицейских, — заявила Нэнси, — Пожалуй, мистеру Гомберу не найти лучшего места, где бы можно было спрятать моего отца, чем этот тоннель. Насколько далеко он тянется, мистер Уортон?

1231

— Мистер Гомбер говорит, что он доходит до самой реки, но конец его сейчас плотно закрыт камнями. Я никогда не ходил дальше лестниц.

1232

Молодой юрист одобрил идею Нэнси: ведь если Натан Гомбер вернётся в дом «Речной пейзаж» и обнаружит исчезновение Вилли Уортона, он попытается скрыться.

1233

Полиция пообещала прислать людей немедленно. Нэнси едва успела закончить разговор с капитаном Росслэндом, как Эллен крикнула ей со второго этажа:

— Нэнси, ты можешь подняться сюда? Мисс Флора настаивает на том, чтобы ей показали потайную лестницу.

1234

Юная сыщица решила, что у неё, пожалуй, хватит времени на это до прихода полиции. Извинившись перед мистером Баррадэйлом, она побежала вверх по лестнице. Ухаживая за матерью, тётя Розмари надела на себя розовый халат. К удивлению Нэнси, миссис Тернбулл была полностью одета. На ней была чёрная юбка и белая блузка с высоким воротником.

1235

Нэнси и Эллен возглавили шествие в направлении чердака. Там Нэнси, став на колени, открыла скрытую дверь.

1236

— И все эти годы я даже не подозревала о её существовании! — воскликнула мисс Флора.

1237

— Сомневаюсь, чтобы и папа знал об этом, иначе он бы сказал, — добавила тётя Розмари.

1238

Нэнси закрыла потайную дверь, и все они двинулись вниз. Она услышала, как позвонили в дверь, и решила, что полиция. Вместе с Эллен она поспешно спустилась вниз. На пороге стоял капитан Росслэнд вместе с ещё одним В Лидером. Они сказали, что остальные полицейские окружили поместье «Речной пейзаж» в надежде схватить Натана Гомбера, если он там объявится.

1239

Девушки, мистер Баррадэйл и офицеры полиции вслед за Вилли Уортоном, шедшим впереди, начали подниматься на чердак, а затем спустились по скрытой лестнице в тоннель с его затхлым воздухом.

1240

— Я много читала о старых подземных переходах, и мне кажется, что из этого тоннеля, возможно, имеется выход в другое помещение, а может быть, и выходы в несколько других помещений.

1241

Коридор освещало сейчас столько ручных фонариков, что там было совсем светло. Продвигаясь вперёд, вся группа внезапно подошла к невысокой каменной лестнице. Вилли Уортон объяснил, что она ведёт к отверстию, находящемуся позади дивана в гостиной. Имелась ещё и другая лестница, которая вела в спальню мисс Флоры. Отверстие, через которое можно было туда проникнуть, находилось рядом с камином.

1242

Поиски продолжались. Нэнси, опередившая остальных, обнаружила в стене дверь, запертую на висячий замок. Что это — каземат? Она слыхала, что в колониальные времена в подобных местах держали пленных.

1243

К этому времени капитан Росслэнд поравнялся с ней.

— Вы думаете, что ваш отец, возможно, находится здесь? — спросил он.

1244

— Я ужасно боюсь, что это так, — сказала Нэнси, содрогаясь при одной мысли о том, что они могут обнаружить за дверью.

1245

Офицер нашёл, что замок сильно заржавел. Вытащив из кармана перочинный нож, снабжённый множеством приспособлений, он вскоре открыл замок и распахнул дверь. Капитан направил луч своего фонарика в тёмное помещение. Оказалось, что это — действительно комната без окон.

1246

Вдруг Нэнси вскрикнула:

— Папа! — и ринулась куда-то впереди всех.

1247

На одеялах, расстеленных на полу, лежал мистер Дру,

Укрытый сверху другими одеялами. Он что-то тихо бормотал.

1248

— Он жив! — вскричала Нэнси. Став около него на колени, она стала поглаживать и покрывать поцелуями его

1249

— Он одурманен наркотиком, — заметил капитан Росслэнд. — По-моему, Натан Гомбер давал вашему отцу ровно столько еды, чтобы он не умер с голоду, и подмешивал к еде снотворное.

1250

Капитан вытащил из кармана маленький флакончик нашатырного спирта и поднёс его к носу мистера Дру. Через сколько мгновений тот замотал головой, а спустя ещё несколько секунд открыл глаза.

1251

— Продолжайте разговаривать с вашим отцом, — приказал капитан Нэнси.

1252

— Папа! Проснись! Все с тобой теперь в порядке! Мы тебя спасли!

1253

Очень скоро мистер Дру осознал, что рядом с ним стоит на коленях его дочь. Высвободив из-под одеял руки, он попытался её обнять.

1254

— Мы отнесём его наверх, — сказал капитан Росслэнд. — Вилли, откройте тот секретный вход в гостиную.

1255

— Очень рад быть вам полезным! — Уортон поспешно бросился вверх по небольшой каменной лестнице.

1256

Тем временем остальные трое мужчин подняли мистера Дру и понесли его по тоннелю. К тому времени, когда они достигли лестницы, Вилли Уортон успел открыть потайную дверь позади дивана в гостиной. Мистера Дру положили на диван. Он заморгал глазами, огляделся вокруг и удивлённо воскликнул:

1257

— Вилли Уортон! А вы как сюда попали? Нэнси, расскажи мне все по порядку.

1258

Крепкое здоровье юриста сослужило ему хорошую службу. Он поразительно быстро оправился от перенесённых испытаний и с жадным вниманием слушал рассказ о событиях последних нескольких дней.

1259

Когда рассказ закончился, раздался стук в парадную дверь, и в дом явился ещё один сотрудник полиции. Он пришёл доложить капитану Росслэнду, что им удалось не только арестовать возле поместья «Речной пейзаж» Натана Гомбера и вернуть всё, что он награбил, но что последний член шайки, участвовавший в похищении мистера Дру, также взят под стражу. Гомбер признался во всём, даже в том, что пытался нанести Нэнси и её отцу увечья, использовав грузовик на строительстве моста в Ривер-Хайтс. Он пытался запугать мисс Флору и заставить её продать «Два вяза» потому, что собирался начать строительство жилых Домов на территории двух владений семейства Тернбулл.

1260

— Ну, тебя можно поздравить с настоящей победой! — с гордостью сказал Нэнси её отец.

1261

Девушка улыбнулась. Хотя она была рада, что со всем этим покончено, она невольно подумывала уже о какой-нибудь очередной тайне, над разгадкой которой ей доведётся потрудиться. И такая возможность действительно вскоре представилась, когда совершенно случайно она оказалась Вовлечённой в новое расследование.

1262

Мисс Флора и тётя Розмари спустились вниз познакомиться с мистером Дру. Пока они с ним разговаривали, капитан Росслэнд удалился, уведя с собой арестованного Вилли Уортона. Мистер Баррадэйл тоже откланялся. Нэнси и Эллен выскользнули из комнаты и направились в кухню

1263

— Мы приготовим великолепный обед, чтобы отпраздновать это событие! — радостно воскликнула Эллен.

1264

— И теперь мы можем говорить о наших планах сколько хотим, — с улыбкой отозвалась Нэнси. — На «посту подслушивания» никого не будет!